Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 27 of 27
  1. #21
    OutandBack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Snipe WinterGnome
    Tarp
    TtTTG 12x10
    Insulation
    WL-TQ/UQ, HG 3/4UQ
    Suspension
    stock
    Posts
    4,188
    Images
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by mbiraman View Post
    Great job. I like some of Arson's suggestions as well as the space blanket reflector idea behind the stove although warm enough is enough..The briquettes idea is great especially when dry wood is hard to find. I have a similar idea on the drawing board but will probably have a canvas beak at the stove end. It might be worth having a dedicated tarp for when your using the stove, one that has sod cloth along the bottom,( extra material that lays on the ground that you cover with snow to eliminate drafts ). I think its a good call not to run the stove at night while asleep,,,,after all we have our down gear and one wants to be awake and alert when operating a stove in close quarters with nylon. Looks like your reaching your goal,,,that's great. Back to the woods in winter in comfort.


    bill
    I've got a piece of flashing ready and I think I'll go pickup a truck windshield sun shade made out of reflectix. Maybe I can do both of AA idea with one light weight piece.

    For me it's never been about sleeping and trying to keep the tarp warm over night. As others have said, we have down quilts for that.

    It's more about having a small protected space to heat my dinner, dry my gloves and socks, poke on a fire while reading a good book before bed time all while it's snowing outside.
    Man, just writing that make me want to pack the truck and head for the mtns. I do love snow camping.

    If I was making a GrizzBeak for this purpose I think I'd sew the door shut. Use the other end of the tarp to enter/exit.
    Less chance of bumping/knocking something over that way.

    When I started this project I purchased a piece of 10oz heat treated canvas and used my GrizzBeak as a template it was so darn heavy I needed a tent pole to keep the RL from sagging. I ended up tossing the idea.
    Maybe the 7.5oz untreated canvas would be much lighter.

  2. #22
    TZBrown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fenton, Michigan
    Hammock
    DIY,Speer,Tbird
    Tarp
    HG CF, MacCat, GG
    Insulation
    HG,JRB,Speer,UGQ
    Suspension
    numerous, seasonal
    Posts
    1,572
    Great Idea and very nicely done.

    I have a dedicated PU coated nylon tarp that I use in winter, since I use a pulk most of the time.

    Adding a beak to one end, of reflective nylon, special for a stove use might be the way to go.

    It is a great time to just poke the fire and read a book as the storm rages outdoors
    Life's A Journey
    It's not to arrive safely at the grave in a well preserved body,
    But rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting,
    Woo Hoo!....What a Ride!

    My PHOTOS

    My VIDEOS

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    38.0123, -122.4900
    Hammock
    WL Snipe
    Tarp
    WB, ZPacks
    Insulation
    Incubators/Pod
    Suspension
    Whoppie/Strap
    Posts
    1,595
    Images
    57
    O&B,

    Looking at your design of using a beak for the stove enclosure has got me thinking I might like to build one out of canvas. Since all this would be carried in a pulk, the weight of a canvas enclosure might not be as much of a concern. Canvas would help ease my fear of melting down my tarp. Have you given any thought to using more fire retardant materials?

    S

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Hammock
    Hennesy
    Tarp
    various
    Insulation
    pads, foam
    Posts
    3,891
    Images
    17
    fire retardant is significantly heavier. That is the nice thing about using a beak as it is the part of maximum concern. If the beak is heavier its not so bad.

    The other thing I would consider is an anchor point inside a pullout patch to anchor a strap to pull the hammock to one side.

  5. #25
    OutandBack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Snipe WinterGnome
    Tarp
    TtTTG 12x10
    Insulation
    WL-TQ/UQ, HG 3/4UQ
    Suspension
    stock
    Posts
    4,188
    Images
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewinder View Post
    O&B,

    Looking at your design of using a beak for the stove enclosure has got me thinking I might like to build one out of canvas. Since all this would be carried in a pulk, the weight of a canvas enclosure might not be as much of a concern. Canvas would help ease my fear of melting down my tarp. Have you given any thought to using more fire retardant materials?

    S
    I thought that at first also.
    I used my standard Grizz Beak as a template and made one from 10oz Fire retardant canvas.
    After they treat 10oz canvas it has the weight and feel of 18oz canvas.

    I had to use an REI tent pole to support the ridgeline since it sagged so much. Bottom line, I tossed the idea. Weight and bulk was not worth it to me.

    You might have better luck with the 7.5oz non treated canvas that many good canvas tent makers use.
    It would withstand brief contact with the stove pipe.

    They do make a fire retardant nylon however it melts just as fast if it touches the stove pipe.
    So that's the trick. How do you keep the nylon from touching the pipe.

    I've based my idea/design off the Kifaru hot tent vestibule.



    Currently trying different ways to support the GrizzBeak with side pullout, more tie outs along the ground. Possibly a pole mod. It's all just fun in the backyard right now.

    Sorry for such a long answer.

  6. #26
    OutandBack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Snipe WinterGnome
    Tarp
    TtTTG 12x10
    Insulation
    WL-TQ/UQ, HG 3/4UQ
    Suspension
    stock
    Posts
    4,188
    Images
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by nothermark View Post
    fire retardant is significantly heavier. That is the nice thing about using a beak as it is the part of maximum concern. If the beak is heavier its not so bad.

    The other thing I would consider is an anchor point inside a pullout patch to anchor a strap to pull the hammock to one side.
    That is an excellent idea.
    What I have been doing so far is crank on one of the whoopies to pull the hammock up tight against the RL.
    With a ground cloth and CCF pad it is amazing how much room you have to stretch out or mess with your pack and gear.
    All while your water is boiling and dinner is warming.
    O&B

  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Eagle River, WI
    Hammock
    Jacks-R-better bridge
    Tarp
    Sportsman's Guide
    Insulation
    JRB Top & Bottom
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    210
    I think you are better off to stick with your nylon. Untreated canvas burns very quickly. You can see some examples of canvas tents that were set on fire on Youtube. They go up in minutes.

    Better route is the pullouts and using the other end of the hammock to come and go.

    My only test of my hot tarp did not work too good. I had too many gaps at the ground and on the ends. I got it up to about 16 deg. when it was 0 deg. outside. I think the answer is to get a better seal with the piled snow.

    The other problem was dealing with frozen ground. Hard to get stakes in and even harder to get them out. I left some behind that were frozen in.

    I am looking more and more at a canvas sock. I have the material, now I just need to sew it.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •