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  1. #1
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    HH ridgeline strength?

    I am a tosser and turner, in my sleep, continually adjust my position in the hammock all night. So, I'm also bouncing up and down, testing the supsension all night too. Now I know my HH Asym Zip suspension ropes are big enough to hold me but I notice that the ridgeline is much smaller and presumably, not nearly as strong. Anyone know just what the ridgeline material is capable of?

    I'll get around to emailing HH direct but I have put the Q here because I am also involved in a sideline discussion about how much tension is on the suspension/ridgeline for a given weight and for a given amount of sag.

    I did do a quick experiment today, put a spring balance in a ridgeline and changed the amount of sag a few times. Essentially, the more the sag, the less weight is seen in the ridgeline as an increace in tension. With a high degree of sag, about half the weight is seen in the ridgeline. For example, 30 degrees or more saw the spring balance read 9 kg when I put 18 kg in the hammock. As the hang was made tighter and tigher, the spring balance reading got closer and closer to that of the weight being added to the hammock. The practical outcome of all this is I figure I need the HH ridgeline to be capable of holding about 100 kg for me to feel safe testing the ridgeline with my sleeping habits

    Ticklebelly.

  2. #2
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    Sorry, but I have no idea of the ridgeline's breaking strength. That said, the same line is used for the Explorer Deluxe models which are guaranteed to 300 lb and probably the Safari models which are rated even higher.

    As long as the hammock is strung snugly, NOT very tightly, and the ridgeline remains undamaged, it should be fine under your weight, tossing or not. If you happen to hang something that somehow abrades the line, cutting it slightly, look into replacing it.
    Rosaleen

    Hennessy Hammock afficionado and supporter.

  3. #3
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
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    From what I've read, most people don't recommend messing with the stock HH ridgeline. As long as you are within the weight limits of the HH Asym (250 lbs/115 Kg) you shouldn't have to worry unless you are trying to use the hammock as a trampoline.

    Hammock ridgelines are not designed to support your full weight - they're just there to provide a uniform sag. That's why you'll see people using 1.75 or 2.2 mm Zing-it for their adjustable structural ridgeline. You wouldn't want to build whoopie sling suspensions out of Zing-it, but it's fine for a ridgeline 'cause the ridgeline doesn't bear your full weight (unless you string it too tight, maybe).

  4. #4
    Knotty's Avatar
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    Not positive about this but I think I remember reading that Hennessy uses 500# test line for the SRL.
    Knotty
    "Don't speak unless it improves the silence." -proverb
    DIY Gathered End Hammock
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  5. #5
    titanium_hiker's Avatar
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    30 degree sag, don't crank the suspension tight and you should be right.
    my hammock gear weights total: 2430g (~86oz)
    Winter: total 2521 (~89oz)
    (see my profile for detailed weights)

    gram counter, not gram weenie!

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Hang at about about 30 degrees and the ridge line will be fairly easy for you to twist with your hand. See this vid by Warbonnet Guy, who, let's face it, knows.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWlM0pROnpU
    The ohysics is in the diagram below

  7. #7
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    I have an expedition and after a few hangs the ridgeline broke. They may have changed the materials in the last couple of years, I don't know. I found the suspension lines had a great deal of stretch and instead of retying over and over again I pulled the hammock to about 15 degrees and let it settle and that put the bottom of the hammock at chair height. That is probably frowned on but I assumed the hammock materials were sturdy enough for a 250lb rated hammock to handle a 6ft.- 215 lb. man without groaning. I was wrong. The hammock itself has never been a problem except it is a bit uncomfortable at the knees and foot, a bit of a squeeze for me. My solution was to change the suspension lines and ridgeline to 1/8" Amsteel. (that is not hard to do) You may find it different but when the trees are further apart than 16ft. I am simply not able to get high enough to get the 30 degree angle and must hang the hammock at whatever angle I can get and the tension is there. I'm pretty dumb about this stuff but that has been my experience.

  8. #8
    titanium_hiker's Avatar
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    Steady- I am pretty happy with "low chair" height- able to reach the ground from my hammock. Cranking your suspension tight puts way more force on it (it's a physics thing- I remember from school the example of a tennis net- the force on those things to that they are horizontal is incredible)

    Some people use their trekking poles to slide the hugger up the tree.
    my hammock gear weights total: 2430g (~86oz)
    Winter: total 2521 (~89oz)
    (see my profile for detailed weights)

    gram counter, not gram weenie!

  9. #9
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    All useful replies, thanks Guys. This is my first hammock and I'm still sorting things out. Currently tying the thing a little tighter than 30 degrees and although I can still twist the ridgeline with the fingers, its getting more rigid. I do find the hammock more comfortable, for me, when I hang a little tighter but do not want to test the thing to destruction, hence the post. I'm well inside the recommended weight limit so I'm not going to worry too much.

    Ticklebelly

  10. #10
    New Member
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    The idea of trekking poles for greater height means longer tree hugger straps for me since I use the whoopie suspension. OH BOY! I now have another item to research and buy! It seems the hunt for hammock stuff is as much fun as the trip....well maybe not. I wonder if you ever get through experimenting and have all the bases covered....NAH...., then I would'nt hear my beautiful wife say "What are you buying now?" LOVE IT

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