Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23
  1. #11
    Member Streetgang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    St Mary's MD
    Hammock
    Hennessy Expedition & WBBB
    Suspension
    whoopies
    Posts
    81
    It''s tough to beat fog. I was on Tray Mountain Ga on Saturday night in rain then fog (cloud) in high winds...The end result was a cold wet night not due to rain but the fog. There is just no way to avoid it.
    Measure twice, cut once.
    Constitution Woodcraft

    in times of crisis some run toward the fight.

  2. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Republic of Texas
    Hammock
    Clark NX-200 w/ ridgeline & NX-250
    Tarp
    Clark XL (x2)
    Posts
    56
    When we hung in Hot Springs, we wound up being almost as wet as if it had rained on us...

    I've found that the weather shield on the Clark keeps most of the mist / fog out of the hammock. Gilligan (in the picture) wasn't so lucky with his HH.

    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/p...ictureid=14214

    (He who wakes up last has to hold the victory flag...)

  3. #13
    Fronkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Grass Valley, Ca
    Hammock
    DIY "The Crippler"
    Tarp
    "Cuben Refugee"
    Insulation
    DIY "The Ex-gf"
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    5,089
    We had a misty night on my last trip out and there is no way a person could do anything about it. I was even wet before I could get in my hammock and when then I get wet again during my 2am tinkle. It's one of the few things that stink about sleeping outside.

    Fortunately, it doesn't happen too often up here in Mn.

    Fronkey

  4. #14
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Jersey Shore, NJ
    Hammock
    BIAS Hiker Lite
    Tarp
    HG Winter Palace
    Insulation
    HG!
    Suspension
    Whoopie/Dutchbling
    Posts
    5,046
    Images
    1
    This has happened to me a couple of times. I laid there in my hammock with my headlamp on and watched the fog come in under the tarp and permeate every square inch of air. I even watched it come under the top quilt.

    I don't know what I would do if I was camping in three straight days of fog, like we had here in NJ a couple of weeks ago. No opportunity to dry things out. I just don't think topcover or undercover would even help in those conditions.

  5. #15
    MT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    St. Louis Park, MN
    Hammock
    WBRR
    Tarp
    Speer, Superfly
    Insulation
    Incubator, Burrow
    Suspension
    Straps
    Posts
    268
    Quote Originally Posted by Fronkey View Post

    Fortunately, it doesn't happen too often up here in Mn.

    Fronkey
    I just got back from a 2-ni...an overnighter on the SHT and had fog so thick I could only see about 15 feet. I just got up, packed up and headed home. Everything is still drying out. Even the UQP didn't help much. I was just going to submit a post when I saw this. I had not though about a Over Quilt Protector. I think I will get the sewing machine out and try to make one. Would a sil QP work better than the breathable? My breathable UPQ didn't help much.
    MT

    "Bye bye, boys!"
    "Have fun storming the castle!"

  6. #16
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Jersey Shore, NJ
    Hammock
    BIAS Hiker Lite
    Tarp
    HG Winter Palace
    Insulation
    HG!
    Suspension
    Whoopie/Dutchbling
    Posts
    5,046
    Images
    1
    The weight of an overcover, undercover or hammock sock just frustrates me. I thought I went to down insulation to eliminate weight.

    If I knew I was going out in fog, I'd just take my 0* synthetic Quallofil bag and skip the down entirely. That bag keeps me warm no matter how damp it gets. The 3.5 lb. weight kind of sucks, though.

  7. #17
    BillyBob58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Tupelo, MS
    Posts
    8,463
    Images
    353
    Wow, interesting thread! Fog/mist sure can be an Uber challenge!

    Quote Originally Posted by bacon_grease View Post
    When we hung in Hot Springs, we wound up being almost as wet as if it had rained on us...

    I've found that the weather shield on the Clark keeps most of the mist / fog out of the hammock. Gilligan (in the picture) wasn't so lucky with his HH.

    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/p...ictureid=14214

    (He who wakes up last has to hold the victory flag...)
    Gilligan needs a Super Shelter! When I was in the Olympics for a week, that is what I had, plus a synthetic bag. I had zero issues. My down using friend was starting to see some loss of loft by the end of that week. I guess it was the fog.

    Quote Originally Posted by Streetgang View Post
    It''s tough to beat fog. I was on Tray Mountain Ga on Saturday night in rain then fog (cloud) in high winds...The end result was a cold wet night not due to rain but the fog. There is just no way to avoid it.
    Were you using down? Did you notice any loss of loft? Maybe not as it was just 1 night?


    Quote Originally Posted by MT View Post
    I just got back from a 2-ni...an overnighter on the SHT and had fog so thick I could only see about 15 feet. I just got up, packed up and headed home. Everything is still drying out. Even the UQP didn't help much. I was just going to submit a post when I saw this. I had not though about a Over Quilt Protector. I think I will get the sewing machine out and try to make one. Would a sil QP work better than the breathable? My breathable UPQ didn't help much.
    Still drying out after just one night? Wow! Same question as above: any loss of loft? Plus a new question: how do you think you would have handled it if this was the 1st night of a week long trip? Maybe with more than one foggy night and a lack of sunshine during the day?

    Quote Originally Posted by SilvrSurfr View Post
    This has happened to me a couple of times. I laid there in my hammock with my headlamp on and watched the fog come in under the tarp and permeate every square inch of air. I even watched it come under the top quilt.

    I don't know what I would do if I was camping in three straight days of fog, like we had here in NJ a couple of weeks ago. No opportunity to dry things out. I just don't think topcover or undercover would even help in those conditions.
    Quote Originally Posted by SilvrSurfr View Post
    The weight of an overcover, undercover or hammock sock just frustrates me. I thought I went to down insulation to eliminate weight.

    If I knew I was going out in fog, I'd just take my 0* synthetic Quallofil bag and skip the down entirely. That bag keeps me warm no matter how damp it gets. The 3.5 lb. weight kind of sucks, though.
    My ~ 0F synthetic WB "Yeti" weighs about 20 oz, or about 16 oz with only 3 layers of Climashield ( very warm with 3 layers to AT LEAST mid 20s)

    My HHSS ( with sil-nylon UC and synthetic OCF pad) weighs ~ 20 oz, good for me into the 30s.

    What I need is a CS TQ, made with UL construction like the Yeti. All I have for top use is my old PG mummy bag with WPB shell, huge draft tubes and neck collar/hood. Pretty heavy by my current standards. But during my one foggy trip, the fog or rain seemed irrelevant. I can't imagine fog being a problem for any of my above listed equipment. Though the 1st night I soaked the foot of the bag and OCF pad from condensation ( did not use the space blanket) it didn't seem to matter. I stayed plenty warm and it dried very quickly( I just squeezed the water out and stuffed it in the dry sack) even without sunshine.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  8. #18
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Like Lewis & Clark: Wintrin' o/t Columbia again: PDX
    Hammock
    Clark w 2QZQ mod,Tropical, NX;Nano
    Tarp
    Clark micro
    Insulation
    Major down
    Suspension
    7/64 SK75 +strap
    Posts
    2,325
    Images
    13
    If HF is a good source for information on differences in fabric wetting and holding condensate, those are not cited here often. There are differences in quality of DWR treatment, and maybe difference inherent in the fabric. Is the Pertex and similar lightweight nylon fabric used by many majors superior to the 1.1 Nylon several HF vendors use?

    For sure, by the test of pressing lips and blowing through fabrics, the 1.1 DWR nylons HG and JRB uses are more permeable to air, and water seems to bead up on them and roll off less than with those Pertex-like fabrics. In other words, the Pertex seems more resistant to wetting from streams of water. From dew, fog, and condensate? I don't know.
    Last edited by DemostiX; 04-01-2012 at 15:45.

  9. #19
    turnerminator's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Peterborough,UK
    Hammock
    DIY Pertex
    Tarp
    DIY with doors on
    Insulation
    Down and synthetic
    Suspension
    Whoopies & hooks
    Posts
    1,333
    Quote Originally Posted by DemostiX View Post
    If HF is a good source for information on differences in fabric wetting and holding condensate, those are not cited here often. There are differences in quality of DWR treatment, and maybe difference inherent in the fabric. Is the Pertex and similar lightweight nylon fabric used by many majors superior to the 1.1 Nylon several HF vendors use?

    For sure, by the test of pressing lips and blowing through fabrics, the 1.1 DWR nylons HG and JRB uses are more permeable to air, and water seems to bead up on them and roll off less than with those Pertex-like fabrics. In other words, the Pertex seems more resistant to wetting from streams of water. From dew, fog, and condensate? I don't know.
    The classic Pertex's fibres are PTFE coated before weaving.

    The coating doesn't wear off at all IME, but its still not very waterproof. Very stain resistant though and hardwearing.

    Its actually less waterproof than Nikwaxed parachute nylon after a few wears but seems more breathable.

  10. #20
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Berkshire, Maidenhead
    Posts
    5
    I am not really sure with this as I have not been in a considerably heavy and irritating kind of fog, and most of the time, I get it just right. But in any case that you just have too much to bear with, you probably could use a partial top shield to help you with it.

    Probably a simple piece of DWR would already suffice with the addition and use of safety pins at your disposal.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •