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  1. #21
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    Elevation = Scrubby Thickets and Deadwood

    You will have to work to find the usable trees on trails in NH White Mountains. I did a Pemi loop and found it a challenge to find trees that I didn't have to bloody myself bushwhacking to. I made many forays off trail to find spots 200 feet from the trail and often returned to the trail frustrated. Also had to descend a mile down a trail to find a spot where the trees were hangable. Above 3000 feet the trees are scrubby and closely packed in with lots of deadwood. As many others have said forget about the ridges.
    You can definitely hang a hammock in the whites as there are plenty of trees, but plan carefully. You may need to descend to find trees that aren't in an impenetrable scrubby thicket.

  2. #22
    sunshower's Avatar
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    Mar 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    I'm thinking of getting a Henessy hammock to go backpacking with in the White Mountains up in New Hampshire. I'm trying to decide wether to just get a Bivy or get a hammock to use backpacking. Have any of you used a hammock to camp out in in this area? My Freind thinks the tree's are too small in the whites and I have not been there to see for my self. Neither of us have any experience with Hammock camping.

    Thanks!
    Andy
    I do have a lot of experience backpacking (hammocking) in the Whites.. those mountains are my playground :0) I definitely would NOT plan on sleeping in a bivy- there are remote campsites but they fill up quickly and that leaves you finding a place to lay your head with nothing but a slope under your feet.. i have seen many people turned away to find spots in between mountains...with hammocks you can camp pretty much anywhere. The trees are not too small unless you are looking to camp in the Alpine Zone which is prohibited anyways. Good luck and have fun!!!
    Megan
    In the depths of winter I finally learned there was in me an invincible summer. [Albert Camus]

  3. #23
    MAD777's Avatar
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    May 2009
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    I do a lot of hiking in New Hampshire as I have a second home in the Whites. The almost complete lack of a flat spot without rocks, roots & trees is what convinced me to ditch my tent. Hammocks are perfect for me in that environment. Especially since I don't camp in established campsites anyway; after all, I'm out there seeking solitude.

    The higher elevations are somewhat problematic due to scrub and spruce. But, a bit of planning will take care of that, just like planning for water crossings so you don't have to carry too much water.
    Mike
    "Life is a Project!"

  4. #24
    sunshower's Avatar
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    and this is the whole reason why we gave up tenting- those rocks do not make nice pillows
    Megan
    In the depths of winter I finally learned there was in me an invincible summer. [Albert Camus]

  5. #25
    Member mp3prozac's Avatar
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    Apr 2012
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    When I am up in the whites and am not sure of the tree situation, I bring an aircore inflatable pad that has insulation. That way if I have to go to the ground, I can use he pad in my blackbird and use my trekking poles to keep the ridgeline and bug net up off my face. It makes a functional bivy sack. I also bring my down sleeping bag as top insulation. By thinking of items that can be used in more than one way, I feel confident in finding adequate sleeping options in the whites.

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