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  1. #11
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    So what happens if I can't find suitable tree's to hang it from? is there a way to use it on the ground?

    thanks for all this info so quickly!
    I see that you haven't purchased a hammock just yet.
    The Claytor Jungle Hammock is built so that you can use as a bivy if needed,
    see this page. On the one hand you get (if properly ordered) a double bottomed hammock so that it is easy to slip in a pad between them, on the other hand this rig runs a bit on the heavy side. You can lighten the load a bit by going with a silnylon tarp (purchased separately from someone else).

    It is possible to rig an HH to be used as a bivy on the ground. Should have a ground sheet, and a movie camera to record you getting into and out of its bottom loading style.

    But you can find suitable trees. You can do like neo did, and hang your hammock across the trail between a couple of trees. You might want to check for moose droppings in the area first though...

    Grizz

  2. #12
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    So what happens if I can't find suitable tree's to hang it from? is there a way to use it on the ground?

    thanks for all this info so quickly!
    http://hennessyhammock.com/use-as-a-tent.html

    www.mosquitohammock.com/junglehammock.html
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

  3. #13
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrizzlyAdams View Post
    see this post.

    Actually I was on the AT in NH last weekend, near Hanover.

    Up in the Whites you do need to work a little bit to
    find spots where the trees are sparse enough to hang.
    But you don't have to work as hard as you do to find
    an off trail site to camp on the ground.

    Grizz

    Funny Pic of tying to the bad weather sign. It was so nasty when I was there I didn't stop for much.

    I wouldn't worry if you are talking about the AT. The longest stretch above treeline is something like 14 miles. Not a bad 14 at that. Only if the weather turns. You may have to search around, but I think you can find enough spots to hang. I don't know of anyone that tents above treeline there anyway. You want some wind break.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  4. #14
    Senior Member elcolombianito's Avatar
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    May 2008
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    only set up my hh on ground once because the terrain where we camped on that trip only had some small but thick bushes with enough space in between. i was able to get a decent tension on the ridgeline so the netting was not a problem. I have two tarps. I used the stock tarp folded under the hammock and the hammock's tie outs were tied to the floor on to rocks. Once you leave some weight inside the hammock, for example the pad and quilt aligned, its quite easy to get in, and as long as everything's well tied out.

    Since the important thing when no trees are found is to tie the support rope/s, at least the foot end of the hhammock, i guess you would only need one way of tying that foot end suspension some 50in from the floor the get some acces to the entrance.

    Quote Originally Posted by GrizzlyAdams View Post
    I see that you haven't purchased a hammock just yet.
    The Claytor Jungle Hammock is built so that you can use as a bivy if needed,
    see this page. On the one hand you get (if properly ordered) a double bottomed hammock so that it is easy to slip in a pad between them, on the other hand this rig runs a bit on the heavy side. You can lighten the load a bit by going with a silnylon tarp (purchased separately from someone else).

    It is possible to rig an HH to be used as a bivy on the ground. Should have a ground sheet, and a movie camera to record you getting into and out of its bottom loading style.

    But you can find suitable trees. You can do like neo did, and hang your hammock across the trail between a couple of trees. You might want to check for moose droppings in the area first though...

    Grizz
    it would be nice if my hh was as easy to set up on the ground as the those pics show the claytor to be.
    Last edited by elcolombianito; 07-03-2008 at 00:12.

  5. #15
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    Come to think about it, I don't remember many if any bugs in the whites when I went through. Might not need to worry about the whole bivy thing and just set up the tarp. I would say cowboy, but everytime I try that i end up wet with dew or unexpected rain.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  6. #16
    New Member
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    Well I have decided to go with a HH hammock for the upcomming trip and I'll write a post about how it go's with maybe a few pics too.
    thanks for all the good info

  7. #17
    New Member FeO2's Avatar
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    Hi Andy,

    I'll be going the 175miles through NH with a HH starting Aug 2nd. I planned 17 days with a stay at Lake of The Clouds and Pinkham Notch (15 miles between the two... in one day)

    I'll let you know how it goes.

    FeO2

  8. #18
    Peter_pan's Avatar
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    Finding trees will be easy enough.... Key to northern hammocking is having a great bottom insulation plan.... Plenty of options.... just plan well from the start.

    Pan
    Ounces to Grams.

    www.jacksrbetter.com ... Largest supplier of camping quilts and under quilts...Home of the Original Nest Under Quilt, and Bear Mountain Bridge Hammock. 800 595 0413

  9. #19
    New Member
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    As others have said, just don't plan on camping above tree line...no one does. There are plenty of trees. In some areas it is difficult to find a campsite because the trees are so dense. It will be easier to hang than find a ground spot though. If you find yourself in an area with few viable camping sites, try to find a place to settle in b4 it gets too late in the day. Stay away from the trail. Camping too close to the trail is frowned upon and punishable by fine. A friend of mine was caught and fined for sleeping next to the trail. This makes finding a good area much more difficult.

  10. #20
    psyculman's Avatar
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    Andy,
    I just got home from a week in the White Nat. Forest, and, go up several times a year. There are some large areas where camping is forbidden, because of preservation of scenery, and camping above the tree line is also prohibited. These places are clearly signed, and noted on any map. Not a problem, I have never lacked a site. (Hennessy SS) Set up early, if you need to, always a somewhat open area here and there. Small trees.......... ? If anything, underbrush can make some sections difficult, but, there are always plenty of places clear enough to hang. July, without a smoky fire is intense for bugs! Especially if there is no breeze. A mother moose and calf were staying almost within sight of my camp for the several days I was there, and one bear trotted across trail. (did I mention the bugs in July?) Water can be somewhat spread out, watch your map as time to settle in gets close. A large tarp of some type is important, torrential thunder storms happen quickly, and, this season, cool nights in the 50's made it necessary for me to take long underwear, and my undercover to place extra insulation in, but no sleeping bag. Some of the parking areas require a parking permit, some do not, they are available at any Forest Service office, one is in Linclon. Have a great time!

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