Old style far as I know. Randy was nice enough to send me his so I will get to see what these are all about, if I can find time to go camping! But I thought I would go ahead and post some 1st impressions.

First thing that is most obvious: heavy as heck compared to what we are used to. My dbl layer BMBH with net and a large tarp runs a bit over 3 lbs, maybe 3 lbs 5 oz more or less, and it is one of the heavier models used around here. This thing runs over 5 lbs( have not actually weighed it), so that is a lot. It is very heavy duty, but only rated for I think 225(250?) lbs. Big heavy adjustment cams and biners, heavy duty webbing side/edges and ridge line, long spreader bars that are bolted to the hammock. This is the model where the hammock body is a bunch of different segments sewn together. wonder why they did that? Later, I am going to try to weigh the hammock separate from the suspension. It is also quickly obvious how to do some mods and drop some significant weight, mostly through the suspension. No pad pocket!

This is basically a suspended tent, and the tent canopy fabric has zippered mesh windows on each side- with nylon covers for bad weather, plus vents on each end. I don't know if the the "tent" fabric is any heavier than a similar sized sil-nylon tarp.

The spreader bars are the widest I have seen, and remain attached ( bolted to) the hammock body. Which so far had proved to be a royal PIA for break down of camp. There is probably a trick, but I don't know it. I am too spoiled being used to quickly stuffing a hammock into a stuff sack or pack. Which is proving quite awkward with the bars staying on the hammock.


Here it is out of pack and tied to trees. Once inside, the "tent" canopy Velcros to the bottom of the hammock, providing complete coverage. I don't know yet if the hammock body is waterproof or breathable, but I think it is WP. If so, I'm sure weather proofing would be more than adequate. But, no coverage unless in the hammock, and no coverage for an UQ. So probably at least a minimal tarp would be needed in addition to the one it comes with.



Looking inside while holding the "tent" to the side. Notice the storage above the spreader bar, same on the foot end:


View from Rt inside , looking out through the zippered mesh window. Just like a tent, and notice the headroom! :


Lt Side "tent" wall suspended-- still provides fair coverage for light straight down rain Of course can still be removed completely:


Plenty of shoulder room, the most of any hammock I have used, and no concerns about the spreader bar hitting the tarp with this cover:


waist to toes the usual bridge style flatness, with zero calf pressure or knee extension:


I actually think my JRB BMBH is a little more comfy for side sleeping. BUT, I can get into a good fetal position in this hammock, no problems at all, best fetal of any bridge I have tried. Yay!


View to both sides is wide open, about the best of any hammock I have tried:


What about comfort? To my surprise, I am not going to call it overall more comfy than my JRB bridge. Back comfort is great, don't really need a pillow, and there is as much or probably more shoulder room than any other hammock I have tried, even more than the non-bridges. Shoulder wise, it is very close to a bed, with really no or very minimal shoulder contact by the hammock. But mine does not seem quite as flat as my JRB, so that on my side there is a tad more so called side "torque" than my JRB, which has none. OTOH, fetal is much easier in this bridge, and some folks must have "fetal", so in that way the Eureka would be superior for side sleeping. So depends on how you look at it.

Also, maybe I have just become so used to the JRB? The lack of shoulder room and narrow cut/close fit don't really bother me anymore, and I'm convinced it makes it easier for me to keep "tucked in" and avoid drafts with a TQ. But for other folks who complain of the lack of shoulder room in a bridge, there is room galore with this bridge.

But what I love is the overall design of this "tent hammock". It feels a lot more like being in a tent. You can really get things sealed off from the wind and wet on the inside, though there is no coverage for your UQ. It is obviously designed to be used with a pad(even though no pad pocket on this model). So you are still going to need enough tarp to protect your UQ. And/or at least enough tarp to allow you to get out of the hammock during extended downpours. But a small tarp combined with this would be some kind of storm proof. However, if the forcast was not really bad, I would not hesitate to just use the supplied tent/tarp/fly by itself. And, NOTHING to stake out!

So it would be nice to see one of our cottage guys take this design and refine it. Keeping some of the advantages but with a much lighter result.

I'll post more as I get more info/experience. Also, I tried to roll out of it, very difficult to do, just like my JRB.