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  1. #1
    New Member
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    Apr 2012
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    Full Hammock Setup for Scandinavian Climate

    Hi all,

    I'm new to hammocks and don't actually own one yet but stumbled on this forum when looking to replace my old 2 person tent with a lighter shelter. So I've been lurking around here and certain YouTube channels almost two weeks now and have learned a lot thanks to all of you! Kind of starting to like the idea of hanging off the ground this summer.

    Maybe you have suggestions for a suitable 3-season outdoor sleeping system to use in a Scandinavian type of climate low temperatures dropping to 5 C (40 F) on summer nights, relatively high humidity, lots of mosquitoes. Im looking for something that has a good weight/comfort ratio for a 3 week continuous solo hike, provides great deal of insulation also in wet conditions and costs below 500 EUR (650 USD) total, hopefully even much less than that
    I prefer more or less breathable materials, don't like heat reflectors at all. Trying to find gear that is also distributed in Europe (shipping and tax reasons).
    Possible combinations I've thought of so far:

    I. 395 / 2920 g ($516 / 103 oz)
    Warbonnet Blackbird Double Layer 1.1
    DD Tarp
    Kick *** Quilts Jarbidge River UQ (half empty pack under feet)
    Kick *** Quilts Owyhee TQ
    Main plus: just seems the best overall compromise for me
    Main concern: 26% tax added to import AHE/KAQ products into EU

    II. 368 / 3770 g ($481 / 133 oz)
    Warbonnet Blackbird Double Layer 1.1
    DD Tarp
    Big Agnes Encampment Sleeping Bag
    Big Agnes Insulated Air Core Sleeping Pad
    Main plus: go-to-ground capability
    Main concern: rolling off the pad, regardless of integrated sleeve on the sleeping bag

    III. 489 / 2637 g ($639 / 93 oz)
    Warbonnet Blackbird Double Layer 1.1
    DD Tarp
    UKhammocks 2/3 Summer UQ (pack as pad under feet)
    UKhammocks Summer TQ
    Main plus: weight
    Main concern: down quilts soaking up moisture and losing insulation properties

    IV. 326 / 3402 g ($426 / 120 oz)
    DD Frontline Hammock
    DD Tarp
    Snugpak Underblanket
    Kick *** Quilts Owyhee TQ
    Main plus: cost
    Main concern: shoulder room

    Sorry this turned out so long... I'm grateful for any kind of advice and comments you may have.

  2. #2
    SnrMoment's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Billings, MT
    Hammock
    DIY
    Tarp
    Streamline
    Insulation
    Down quilts
    Suspension
    Bat Feet
    Posts
    958
    The WBBB with the DD tarp and a UQ with a silnylon exterior should take care of your needs. Don't think you will have much in the way of issues with the TQ. The down is light and packs compactly. I'd pay close attention to the Minnesota hangers opinions
    Love is blind. Marriage is an eye opener.

  3. #3
    Senior Member born2roam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Het Westland, The Netherlands
    Hammock
    Hennessy UL Explorer (2QZQ Mod #4)
    Tarp
    HG Winter Palace
    Insulation
    Baby Orca & NoSniv
    Suspension
    Whoopie & biner
    Posts
    957
    Images
    9
    Hi Tunk,

    welcome to the forum. There are quite a few Scandinavian hangers who will more then likely be able to help you out too.

    Last summer I worked in Sweden (outdoor and survival training) and spend most nights in my hammock. Although enough rain (and even hail/sleet) never had a problem with my down quilts.

    From your list I would go for option 3, personally I do not get on with DD hammocks (too narrow for my liking).

    To add to your options, you could choose a synthetic UQ from DD (bulky and relatively heavy but very warm and comfy) and a Warbonnet Superfly from UKHammocks. This all with import taxes in mind.

    For the record here is a pic from last summer



    and the gear list
    Hennessy Hammock with 2qZq modification (in the pic the bugnetting is stowed away) (changed suspension to whoopies)
    Tatonka Tarp (sold it, great but too heavy [polycotton], saving up for Cuben, in the meantime use a small JRB 8x8)
    JRB No Sniveler (down) underquilt
    Highlight sleeping bag used as topquilt

    Have fun hanging!

    Grtz Johan
    ***
    My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplaces of existence.
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  4. #4
    Harstad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Harstad, Norway
    Hammock
    Wbbb 1.7 dbl
    Tarp
    Superfly
    Insulation
    Down UQ & TQ
    Suspension
    Webb & buckl.
    Posts
    161
    Images
    6
    Hi. Hanger from Scandinavia here (northern Norway).

    I must admit I have not been using down quilts on trips lasting several days. But I would not hesitate to do it if my spare time allowed I think the main concern is direct rain blowing in from the side or running down the suspension. Do a proper job when making camp and have no worries.

    I would go for option nr. 3. (or nr 1)
    If money allows go for a WB superfly, save 200 grams of your back.

    I think a common experience here is that you will not be satisfied with a setup that is almost good enough. Do it right the first time and save money in the long run
    If I die, my biggest fear is that my wife will sell my gear for what I told her I paid for it.

    I am learning from my mistakes, so I can make better and bigger mistakes.

  5. #5
    Womble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Geneva, Switzerland
    Hammock
    Dreamhammock Tbird DL camo
    Tarp
    WB Superfly
    Insulation
    EE RevX / HG Inc.
    Suspension
    Exped
    Posts
    232
    Images
    7
    +1 for the Superfly. I have the DD Tarp and the Superfly and the SF is bigger with integrated doors, but less heavy and packs smaller.

    UKHammock's prices are very honest, considering that you save on shipping and no VAT inside EU. The DD hammocks with 270cm are on the smaller side, so that depends on your bodysize. With my 193cm I learned to appreciate 300cm (and not-so-soon 330cm ).

  6. #6
    Senior Member Beast 71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Big Lake, MN
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.7 dbl.
    Tarp
    WBSuperfly w/doors
    Insulation
    JRB TQ&UQ quilts
    Posts
    1,358
    You can't go wrong with a Warbonnet Blackbird for comfort and bug protection. With a 26% tariff and international shipping I think it's still worth the price.

    At 40F/4.44C any pad or 3 season underquilt should work well. I like down but where I'm from, when it drops below freezing the air is usually dry, but for wet conditions it's good that you're considering synthetic insulation.

    If cost is a big issue I'd put my money into a hammock and tarp first and make due with the pad and sleeping bag that I already own, while I saved up for quilts.

    Happy hangin,
    B

    PS Hammocks aren't always the lightest option when you're camping in the extreme cold, but they sure are comfier.

  7. #7
    New Member
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    Apr 2012
    Location
    On the road
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    2
    Thanks for the suggestions! I believe you talked me into WB Superfly - since that's big enough to wrap around the hammock basically like a tent, it must be enough to keep down underquilt dry in any kind of weather.

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