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  1. #11
    Senior Member elcolombianito's Avatar
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    May 2008
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    Bogota, Colombia
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    Before doing research on the Nest i had done an equally, probably larger, dig into the SS. Hennessy has not let me down with any of its products i own, and I don't think the SS would be an exception. But the nest does appear to have many advantages over the SS and maybe worth those extra bucks.

    i thank you all for the input.
    Last edited by elcolombianito; 07-22-2008 at 00:23.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Ashman's Avatar
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    Nov 2007
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    Greensboro, NC
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    I got the Sniveler and was pleased with it. I didn't try to put it in the skins with the hammock, I stored in in the stuff sack they come with. It took my a little fiddleing to get things like I wanted but once I got that down, It is really easy to set up. Doug the Elder's comments are spot on. You pay more for this system but I don't read too many people who go this route and come back saying they regret it. The ability to use the Sniveler as a camp cover is nice too. They guys I went with mocked me a bit till the temps dropped and they were wrapping up in their pack covers! Its a nice way of having something extra for camp without having to pack more gear.

  3. #13
    New Member
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    Jul 2007
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    Philly, PA
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    I've used the Nest twice times, once in November near Gettysburg, and last night in the Poconos. In November, I was much warmer than my tenting friends.

    Last night, I was car camping with friends, and took the opportunity to test my new Jacks R Better Weathershield 2. I was also using a Maccat and a HH. We had crazy thunderstorms and rain for much of the night. The low was around 63. The weathershield got wet, and protected the Nest. I had a cold spot on my back at one point until I realized I was scrunched towards the bottom end of the HH, and once I stretched out to be more in the middle, the cold spot went away. (i.e., the way I was lying had probably compressed the nest in the middle.) The nest felt very slightly damp in the morning, but it was cold and humid, so that wasn't surprising - almost everything was slightly damp. I am very happy with my Nest.

    ---Amy

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.7 dbl or HH Explorer UL
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    Siltarp 2 Stock HH
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    Wow, that is a lot of serious hammocking, and in a great place! (envy!) ...snip...
    PS-you say lows to mid 30s? That is still pretty cool, even up high, for July in the PNW. Do you use just the standard pad, or do you add anything extra down below? Do you use the space blanket?
    It has been the trip of a lifetime. Nothing like being unemployed!

    Yes, it was pretty chilly, but I was camping in the foothills of Mt Hood, etc. above the snowline. The PNW is 5-6 weeks behind schedule with the snowmelt this year due to the record snowfalls in the Cascades, and all that snow is keeping temps down I believe. I keep a simple thermometer clipped to my backpack, and I normally do a quick check when I get up in the morning. It was surprising how cold it would get at night up there.

    Equipment: standard pad, Heatsheet SB, and 30F mummy down sleeping bag. The bag is used as a quilt until it gets really cold, then I mummy up. Despite the conventional wisdom of the forum, I find the sleeping bag underneath gives me at least an extra 10 degrees.

    --Kurt

  5. #15
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwpapke View Post
    It has been the trip of a lifetime. Nothing like being unemployed!

    Yes, it was pretty chilly, but I was camping in the foothills of Mt Hood, etc. above the snowline. The PNW is 5-6 weeks behind schedule with the snowmelt this year due to the record snowfalls in the Cascades, and all that snow is keeping temps down I believe. I keep a simple thermometer clipped to my backpack, and I normally do a quick check when I get up in the morning. It was surprising how cold it would get at night up there.

    Equipment: standard pad, Heatsheet SB, and 30F mummy down sleeping bag. The bag is used as a quilt until it gets really cold, then I mummy up. Despite the conventional wisdom of the forum, I find the sleeping bag underneath gives me at least an extra 10 degrees.

    --Kurt
    OK then, yet another person whose experience with SS pretty much matches my own. Just the one pad, under cover and space blanket, at about 15 ozs counting the 2 oz walmart SB ( don't know weight of heatsheet) per HH's listed weights( I think mine weighs in about 3 ozs more than specified by HH). And you are just fine for multiple nights with lows to mid 30s, plus you pick up some additional wind and rain protection from the Sil-nylon UC, IMO. I have several ways to stay warm in a hammock, but I still say, price and weight/to warmth and comfort and quick dry capability, not too shabby!

    Down UQs and Pods are great pieces of gear, with their pros and cons, and goodness knows I love my PeaPod, and would probably love a high quality down UQ as much or more. And, a strong case can also be made for pads in SPEs or double bottom hammocks like JRBs or Claytors. Lot's of pro's to be considered there, as well as a few cons.

    But when I look at all things considered, my first system, the HH SS, ain't all that shabby.
    At least not for the 1/2 dozen or so folks here ( maybe more counting WB) who have had good success with them. And I realize there are some folks who have had no luck with them. But then, I have seen more than a few folks here struggle with UQs when approaching 30* or a little below, so it can go either way, especially during the learning curve.

    I'd say a big advantage for a down UQ is the tiny volume they pack down to. However, at least compared to a non-compressible CCF pad, again, the SS is not too bad. This is not recommended, it would be too much work on the trail. I just wanted to see if I could do it. But it does show the potential with a compression stuff sack, cause I think it could go down even smaller with one of those. This picture is of the larger, 35" Explorer SS, WITH under cover as well as pad. Without the UC, you could of course get the pad down even smaller.



    In addition, Kurt, we have the same opinion of the benefits of using the bag "mummy" style when pushing the limit of the bags temp rating.

    I'm glad there are several good ways, of varying prices and pros and cons, to keep warm in a hammock.
    Bill
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  6. #16
    Peter_pan's Avatar
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    Oct 2006
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    virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    OK then, yet another person whose experience with SS pretty much matches my own. Just the one pad, under cover and space blanket, at about 15 ozs counting the 2 oz walmart SB ( don't know weight of heatsheet) per HH's listed weights( I think mine weighs in about 3 ozs more than specified by HH). And you are just fine for multiple nights with lows to mid 30s, plus you pick up some additional wind and rain protection from the Sil-nylon UC, IMO. I have several ways to stay warm in a hammock, but I still say, price and weight/to warmth and comfort and quick dry capability, not too shabby!

    Down UQs and Pods are great pieces of gear, with their pros and cons, and goodness knows I love my PeaPod, and would probably love a high quality down UQ as much or more. And, a strong case can also be made for pads in SPEs or double bottom hammocks like JRBs or Claytors. Lot's of pro's to be considered there, as well as a few cons.



    But when I look at all things considered, my first system, the HH SS, ain't all that shabby.
    At least not for the 1/2 dozen or so folks here ( maybe more counting WB) who have had good success with them. And I realize there are some folks who have had no luck with them. But then, I have seen more than a few folks here struggle with UQs when approaching 30* or a little below, so it can go either way, especially during the learning curve.

    I'd say a big advantage for a down UQ is the tiny volume they pack down to. However, at least compared to a non-compressible CCF pad, again, the SS is not too bad. This is not recommended, it would be too much work on the trail. I just wanted to see if I could do it. But it does show the potential with a compression stuff sack, cause I think it could go down even smaller with one of those. This picture is of the larger, 35" Explorer SS, WITH under cover as well as pad. Without the UC, you could of course get the pad down even smaller.



    In addition, Kurt, we have the same opinion of the benefits of using the bag "mummy" style when pushing the limit of the bags temp rating.

    I'm glad there are several good ways, of varying prices and pros and cons, to keep warm in a hammock.
    Bill
    For those who are not aware there are three JRB Winter UQ... including the Winter Nest, which debuted at Trail Days 2008 as a 5th Anniversary Special that function well below 20*....

    The JRB Mt Washinton Under Quilt which will debute next week at the Outdoor Retailer Show in Salt Lake City.... Worlds warmest UQ....Dual differential design, body countoured, constant height radial baffles, 800 pf down, .... 0-10 * capability as a UQ....

    Pan
    Ounces to Grams.

    www.jacksrbetter.com ... Largest supplier of camping quilts and under quilts...Home of the Original Nest Under Quilt, and Bear Mountain Bridge Hammock. 800 595 0413

  7. #17
    Senior Member ringtail-THFKAfood's Avatar
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    Thumbs up SS v Nest

    I had one of the early Super Shelters and ended up selling it to a hiker in a warmer climate. I was comfortable down to about 45 in the Super Shelter. The Nest is comfortable down to about 35. By adding jacket gloves, balaclava the Nest will take me down to 25. I believe I could added a closed cell torso pad and survive to 15, but would not enjoy it.

    Both are fine products. I recommend the Super Shelter for warm climates and the Nest for cooler areas.
    It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so.
    - Mark Twain

  8. #18
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter_pan View Post
    For those who are not aware there are three JRB Winter UQ... including the Winter Nest, which debuted at Trail Days 2008 as a 5th Anniversary Special that function well below 20*....

    The JRB Mt Washinton Under Quilt which will debute next week at the Outdoor Retailer Show in Salt Lake City.... Worlds warmest UQ....Dual differential design, body countoured, constant height radial baffles, 800 pf down, .... 0-10 * capability as a UQ....

    Pan
    Oh man, does that sound interesting! To the website!
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

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