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  1. #1
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    Webbing vs Spyderline on DIY Bridge

    Which way is easier to build - stitching the webbing to the body or making the channel for spyderline?

    Once my machine is delivered I will be starting my DIY bridge and thinking easier will be better for a newbie.

  2. #2
    Dutch's Avatar
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    I'm sure it has been done but have not heard of anyond stitching the webbing to the hammock. It doen't sound like a good idea to have stitching part of the suspension. I have sewn loops on my bridge to attach the suspension so it can be done. I think if you are making a traditional speer type hammock most people whip it then attach the suspension.
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  3. #3
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmudler View Post
    Which way is easier to build - stitching the webbing to the body or making the channel for spyderline?

    Once my machine is delivered I will be starting my DIY bridge and thinking easier will be better for a newbie.

    Oh dear how do I say this... maybe just straight out is best. In _my_ opinion a DIY Bridge hammock is not a project to tackle for a newbie whether or not you sew on the webbing. If you are new to sewing, erm excuse me... making gear... start with stuff sacks. I know its an old joke but until you have had some experience with the machine and handling fabric you will find a larger project to be any thing but fun. I have been sewing and make gear for years and this bridge I am working on now is real bear. Now mind you I am not a natural born seamster like some others. But do yourself a favor, again in _my_ opinion and tackle something like pillows, stuff sacks or bean bags. Then move on to the bigger stuff.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
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    Sorry - let me clarify

    The DIY bridge hammock and dual mode bridge hammock by Grizzly Adams he used two different process for the suspension.

    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ead.php?t=1676
    this shows stitching the webbing to the body, rolling it twice and stitching again.

    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...8531#post68531
    The construction of the suspension arc illustrates the use of a channel.

    I am curious which one is easier to construct for a person who has not sewn since the 8th grade.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramblinrev View Post
    Oh dear how do I say this... maybe just straight out is best. In _my_ opinion a DIY Bridge hammock is not a project to tackle for a newbie whether or not you sew on the webbing. If you are new to sewing, erm excuse me... making gear... start with stuff sacks. I know its an old joke but until you have had some experience with the machine and handling fabric you will find a larger project to be any thing but fun. I have been sewing and make gear for years and this bridge I am working on now is real bear. Now mind you I am not a natural born seamster like some others. But do yourself a favor, again in _my_ opinion and tackle something like pillows, stuff sacks or bean bags. Then move on to the bigger stuff.
    The wife and I have several projects to do first and yes several stuff sacks will be made I used to do upholstery work and comfortable working with material. It has been many years since I have sewed. I am really hoping my wife, after making curtains and drapes will actually sew the hammock.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmudler View Post
    Which way is easier to build - stitching the webbing to the body or making the channel for spyderline?

    Once my machine is delivered I will be starting my DIY bridge and thinking easier will be better for a newbie.
    After RR posted I realized you were making a bridge. IF you don't listen to his warning and still want to dive into making a bridge. What I did for my bridge is the long hem with the catcut has 3/8 webbing sewn into the hem. Then I sew a 4" loop out of 1" webbing with about 6 inches attached to the webbing in the hem. I tie spider line to the loop that goes to a buckle, then webbing goes to the tree.

    So it is tree>webbing>buckle>spiderline Y>hammock<spiderline Y<buckle<webbing<tree

    Hope this helps more than my first post
    Peace Dutch
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  7. #7
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    The dual mode is what I a working with now. What a beast...but your upholstery background will stand you in good stead. If I understand GA's directions... and I hope I do cause I am trying to follow them... he made the channel big enuf for webbing but is currently running cordage through it. I made my channel big enuf for a hawser for two reasons...

    1 I am no where near the seamster GA is

    2 this is a mock up to see if I want to invest the time effort and money into a real one. So I worked with the rope I had.

    Have a good time. But don't let your wife hog the thread injector. You need some fun too.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
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  8. #8
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    The simple and short answer is : sewing the webbing in is definitely the easier approach.
    1. cut the suspension curve in the fabric.
    2. pin the webbing in so that one edge follows the cut.
    3. Run a stitch to hold the webbing in place.
    4. Roll twice and stitch again (3 stitches) to finish the job.

    The main reason I later went with the channel and cord was to cut
    down on weight and bulk. Making the channel is a bit more work, at
    least the way I've done it, because I want at least 3 or 4 layers of fabric
    at the point I put the stitches, I want the channel to be of uniform width
    (which, RR, is why I put that webbing in when sizing it).

    I've told the story before, but the HF postership continues to grow and mayhapst there are some who don't know it. Almost exactly a year ago I didn't sew at all. TeeDee and then schrochem posted pictures on how they were building bridge hammocks. TeeDee's illustrations in particular showed me I could learn to sew well enough to do that. In part because the scary part---the cut suspension---was a simple as cutting a curve, rolling some webbing on it, and sewing in straight lines, at least locally. That's what drew me into the DIY madness. The craziness with channels and cords and double-bodies and flat felled seams all came later. The basic bridge hammock is extremely simple.

    Grizz
    Last edited by GrizzlyAdams; 07-24-2008 at 16:39. Reason: add all the missing

  9. #9
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    What I find "advanced" if you will is not the stitching per se but the manipulation of all that fabric in its various forms and attachments. Trying to keep the body fabric out of the seam can be a nightmare if one is not careful and used to working with billows of soft slinky fabric. I agree, the techniques used to make the hammock, even the dual mode is pretty straight forward. But the more practice one has controling the fabric and machine the simpler that becomes. The basic Bridge hammock is simplicity itself to put together if you have the patience and the practice to do the job.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
    Mrs. Loftus to Huck Finn

    We Don't Sew... We Make Gear! video series

    Important thread injector guidelines especially for Newbies

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  10. #10
    GrizzlyAdams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramblinrev View Post
    What I find "advanced" if you will is not the stitching per se but the manipulation of all that fabric in its various forms and attachments. Trying to keep the body fabric out of the seam can be a nightmare if one is not careful ...
    ah, I hear you. It's not just hammocks. I have a fairly considerable line of ripped out stitch in my DIY down UQ, zipping across a channel, enough so that upon discovering it I took measures to plug up the holes on the inside with a strip of fabric I glued in (to keep the down from escaping). Dutch would find that spot in a heartbeat if I let him close enough to the quilt. Happened because there were multiple layers of fabric to be managed and one of them slipped out of my control.

    Not for the faint of heart or the fumble of hand is this thread injection activity

    Grizz

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