Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    17
    Yes, I am indeed making a G4 pack and this is my first experience sewing. It asks for three long bar tacks along the collar that sits overs the shoulder straps where they attach to the back piece.

    I will probably just use the reverse stitch button held down to help alleviate the issues I'm having. I was hoping to not do that, because my Brother 6000i does reverse stitching VERY slow. The biggest concern is that I still have the issue of not being able to see the original stitch when reversing stitching which makes it difficult to ensure I am actually stitching over the original and not deviating to one side or the other of the original first stitch. I suppose if the presser foot was clear then I wouldn't really have any issues, but that's not the case unfortunately.

    I suppose it will just take time and lots of practice on scrap material, which I was trying to do last night, but not having a whole lot of success.

  2. #12
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Milton, PA
    Hammock
    Hennessey Explorer Ultralight
    Tarp
    Hennessey Hex
    Insulation
    HH Super Shelter
    Suspension
    ring buckle
    Posts
    7,298
    Images
    101
    Quote Originally Posted by IOInterrupt View Post
    when reversing stitching which makes it difficult to ensure I am actually stitching over the original and not deviating to one side or the other of the original first stitch. I suppose if the presser foot was clear then I wouldn't really have any issues, but that's not the case unfortunately.
    Yeah... that navigation in reverse is a bear. Typically a presser foot has a slit in the front of it. That slit can be used to keep the stitch line in the general position where you want it. But still it requires some practice.

    _But_ and this is a big but... the forward and reverse zigzag stitches are rarely balanced with each other. In other words, if you try to match the forward and reverse stitches, like on a buttonhole where they side-by-side, you will have to make some special adjustments to the machine, if that is even possible.

    So don't fret the small stuff. if someone is looking at the bar tacks on your strap yokes they are looking at the wrong thing. It is amazing how much you mess something you DIY and they still oh and ah over it.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
    Mrs. Loftus to Huck Finn

    We Don't Sew... We Make Gear! video series

    Important thread injector guidelines especially for Newbies

    Bobbin Tension - A Personal Viewpoint

  3. #13
    Redoleary's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Pennfield Twp, MI
    Hammock
    DIY gathered end
    Tarp
    Hinterland gear
    Insulation
    down bag
    Suspension
    strap & E.T.'s
    Posts
    3,183
    Images
    69
    A mil-spec bar tack is 42 stitch pattern. 12 stitches in a very skinny Z pattern with 30 stitch zig zag over the top. Scroll down to page three of this document.
    Good luck,
    RED

    My Youtube Channel

    Deep peace of the running wave to you.
    Deep peace of the flowing air to you.
    Deep peace of the quiet earth to you.
    Deep peace of the shining stars to you.
    Deep peace without end to you.
    adapted from - ancient gaelic runes

  4. #14
    MacEntyre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Jamestown, NC
    Hammock
    Molly Mac Gear
    Posts
    7,559
    Images
    6
    The Molly Mac Gear Specification for Bar Tacks differs from the mil-spec...

    1. straight stitches for strength
    2. 5 to 7 stitches per inch
    3. three passes, no more and no less
    4. one or two stitches overlap the item being tacked on each end of each pass
    5. 'dither' the fabric a little, so the three passes do not follow exactly the same path... the finished bar tack then has a braided look.


    I watched an automated Juki making mil-spec bar tacks at the Industries for the Blind... it was just as Redolearly described, the first zig zag passes had a longer stitch length and narrow width, and the final pass was the opposite, a wide, close zig zag stitch that covered everything and was the only thing visible when it was done.

    - MacEntyre
    "We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately." - Ben Franklin
    www.MollyMacGear.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •