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  1. #1
    New Member basko's Avatar
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    May 2012
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    New hanger question about insulation setups...

    I'm sure it's been asked. I just can't seem to find it with a search...

    As for insulation...when do you decide to use a bottom quilt? Or do you use it instead of a sleeping bag?

    For instance...I have a 20* bag and it's getting to 25degrees at night. Would I be ok with only my bag?

    So I guess I'm asking if the UQ increases the temp rating... Also, is it better to just use a UQ and smaller (meaning higher temp rating) bag inside the hammock?

    Do regular bags not work as well in hammocks due to the compression? That sort of thing...

    Any links or help would be great!!

  2. #2
    Bubba's Avatar
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    May 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
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    WBBB 1.7 SL
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    WB Superfly
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    WB and UGQ
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    Whoopies or Straps
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    Under insulation is pretty much needed in most temp less than 70 degrees F. Depends if you are a cold sleeper or hot sleeper. There is a lot of convective heat loss and an UQ is the most comfortable way to keep your back warm. You can use your bag in the hammock but the part you lay on will be compressed and will lose its insulation properties. An less expensive way to go would be to use some kind of sleeping pad under you. It works fine but you may experience cold spots specifically your shoulders.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  3. #3
    dejoha's Avatar
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    Jun 2009
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    Flagstaff, AZ
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    Your 20-degree bag is not going to cut it when it's 25-degrees out night.

    Whether in a hammock or on the ground, you compress the insulation beneath you. On the ground, you have a pad to make up for the missing insulation. In a hammock, you won't have anything, and you'll feel the effects of convective heat loss pretty quickly.

    Most folks will tell you that 70-degrees is the magic temperature when you start to need additional layers beneath.

    Under quilts are nice, but you can use a pad (closed-cell or self-inflating, etc.). I used a closed-cell foam pad for years (along with other pad-type inslulations) until I received my first under quilt. Quilts allow you to take fuller advantage of the hammock's comfort, although that argument can be subjective; there are folks who think a pad makes the hammock more comfortable.

    I find that if my backside is warmer, I need less on top (e.g., a 20-degree under quilt paired with a 35-degree top quilt/bag). If my backside is cold (Cold Butt Syndrome), even a zero-degree bag isn't enough.

    Some synthetic bags compress less than down, so you may be able to get away with just a sleeping bag in the summer months. Much depends on the insulation type, ambient temperature, and humidity.

    I highly recommend you do test runs in your backyard first.

  4. #4
    New Member basko's Avatar
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    May 2012
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    Kansas City, MO
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    Good replies. Thanks, that really explains a lot.

    I'm hoping that I can keep my overall "bedroom weight" with a hammock, pad, UQ and sleeping pad to similar or lighter than my one-person tent setup. This may only be a few ounces lighter, but I'm sure I'll sleep better than I do on the ground.

    I usually dont camp when it's colder than 30 or so.

    I went ahead and ordered a TEWA breeze (overtsuffed). It'll get me through the summer and fall and I can gauge from there what I need to adjust.

    Thanks again.

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