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  1. #1
    Doctari's Avatar
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    Spectra cord, where/what to buy?

    At the Mt rogers campout I got aquanted with the spectra cord as used on a Hennessy, Looks like the way to go, lots lighter than my webbing, and (more importantly) packs smaller. Do anyone know where to get the spectra cord at? I looked at the Hennessy site, they don't have it listed as an accessory.
    I think I found it on a few sites, but I'm not sure it's the same stuff. So, that brings up the question: What do I look for?


    Doctari.

  2. #2
    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
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    The link below is a source I found from a link of Jeff's website. It is Amsteel Dyneema (same as Spectra). It is about 5 ounces per 100 feet and at .24 a foot reasonably priced. Not sure what the HH uses but this will work with a 1200-1400 lb breaking strength with the 7/64 cord.


    http://www.apsltd.com/Tree/d9000/e6160.asp
    http://www.samsonrope.com/index.cfm?rope=190
    Last edited by hangnout; 02-01-2007 at 23:21.

  3. #3
    Senior Member blackbishop351's Avatar
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    That Annapolis Performance Sailing company is great to work with. I've got some of the 1/8" Spyderline (see their site) coming right now. Looks like it'll work just as well if not better than the stock HH spectra.
    "Physics is the only true science. All else is stamp collecting." - J. J. Thompson

  4. #4
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    I just got some of this stuff. I got the 7/64" Armsteel. It is not spectra, but it is really light. I called and was quoted a breaking strength greater than 1300 lbs and usually close to 1600 lbs. They offer thicker links if you want a higher rating. Shipping takes a while though. I think it took something like 2+ weeks to get here. Let me know if you are need some sooner.

    I am planning on mainly using this for my ridgeline, suspend the hammock from the straps, and whipping the hammock ends.

    A side note. You will probibly need some sort of tree huggers with this or something of similar thickness to protect the tree.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by HANGnOUT View Post
    The link below is a source I found from a link of Jeff's website. It is Amsteel Dyneema (same as Spectra). It is about 5 ounces per 100 feet and at .24 a foot reasonably priced. Not sure what the HH uses but this will work with a 1200-1400 lb breaking strength with the 7/64 cord.


    http://www.apsltd.com/Tree/d9000/e6160.asp
    http://www.samsonrope.com/index.cfm?rope=190
    Man, I always get beat to the punch.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  6. #6
    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
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    Man, I always get beat to the punch.
    Yea, but your place was only .14 a foot. That is a great price

    I just got some of this stuff. I got the 7/64" Armsteel. It is not spectra, but it is really light.
    http://www.answers.com/topic/dyneema

    Quote from link above

    Dyneema was invented by DSM in 1979. It has been in commercial production since 1990 at a plant in Heerlen, the Netherlands. In the Far East, DSM has a cooperation agreement with Toyobo Co. for commercial production in Japan. In the United States, DSM has a production facility in Greenville, North Carolina which is the largest production facility in the United States for UHMWPE fiber. Honeywell has developed a chemically identical product on its own. The Honeywell product is sold under the brand name Spectra.

  7. #7
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    Yeah but shipping was $13.91 for 150 feet (I usually order extra of everything I use for DIY stuff). I think it was more handling then shipping.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  8. #8
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    Ok the engineer in me that to read all of Hangouts link on the stuff.

    Another problem, in some applications, is that Dyneema will creep, meaning it will deform when placed under any long term stress.
    This is a little concerning. Although I don't think that I am fully loading it in my hammock. As long as the deforming takes a long time, it should be fine.

    it is very resistant to water, moisture, most chemicals, UV radiation, and micro-organisms.
    ....
    Its melting point is around 144 or 152 degrees Celsius, and according to DSM, it is not advisable to use Dyneema at temperatures exceeding 80 to 100 C for long periods of time. It becomes brittle at temperatures below 150 C. This contrasts strongly with other high-performance fibers, which tend to be quite heat-resistant.
    This is good. As long as I do not use it above a fire or pour liquid nitrogen around it.

    Pretty cool how it getts its strength the opposite way from kevlar.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  9. #9
    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
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    I am planning on mainly using this for my ridgeline, suspend the hammock from the straps, and whipping the hammock ends.
    I used this cord as one long line from tree to tree doubling as the the ridgeline. I then tied knots in this line as "stopper" knots for the line coming up from the hammock. I used a prussik style attachment to the main line. I can change the sag by loosening the prussik loop and sliding to the next knot. I stole an idea from Patrick from KAQ and covered the Amsteel with sheathing from paracord (PIA to do but looks good). I sewed the end of my tree hugger loop just big enough to run the cord through. My tree huggers are always attached this way (another idea stolen form some forum that I can't remember). It has worked great so far. I am not sure about using it for whipping because it is fairly slick.
    Last edited by hangnout; 02-02-2007 at 00:40.

  10. #10
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    It's working so far. I spent a couple hours in my hammock whipped with this.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

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