Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 51
  1. #21
    Senior Member blackbishop351's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Hammock
    Homemade Speer-type
    Tarp
    BlackCat
    Insulation
    Potomac UQ
    Posts
    1,564
    Images
    59
    I've thought about something like that. Honestly, I had a sit pad I could've used, and I could've adjusted my clothing too - I was DEAD asleep, though. I didn't notice my feet were ice 'till I woke up Sunday morning.

    The weird part about it was that I (my WHOLE body) was TOASTY until I got up for a pee break around 3am. Turned out that NCPatrick was up too, and we talked for about 45 minutes before I went back to bed - just enough time for my feet to get cold. I figured they'd warm up after laying in the hammock for a while, but I guess they never did. I'm not sure exactly what caused it.

    It's hard to even compare to the previous night, because I tossed a heat pack in my footbox Friday night before I went to sleep, being overly cautious about the fairly bad circulation I have in my feet.
    "Physics is the only true science. All else is stamp collecting." - J. J. Thompson

  2. #22
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Lawrenceville, Ga
    Hammock
    JRB Bear Mtn. Bridge
    Tarp
    BlackCat/JRB 11x10
    Insulation
    Pad(s)/JRB Quilts
    Posts
    2,424
    Images
    34
    My feet got seroiusly cold setting up camp last nite. The hardened snow really froze my toes. Might have to look into getting some Sierra Design mutts to thaw them out in the hammock. Any advise as to how to keep my feet warmer in snowy conditions? I was using trail runners and darn tough brand sox.
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

  3. #23
    Senior Member blackbishop351's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Hammock
    Homemade Speer-type
    Tarp
    BlackCat
    Insulation
    Potomac UQ
    Posts
    1,564
    Images
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by FanaticFringer View Post
    My feet got seroiusly cold setting up camp last nite. The hardened snow really froze my toes. Might have to look into getting some Sierra Design mutts to thaw them out in the hammock. Any advise as to how to keep my feet warmer in snowy conditions? I was using trail runners and darn tough brand sox.
    At Rogers, I wore: 1 pair nylon sock liners, 2 pair Smartwool socks (one medium weight, one heavyweight), and my North Face Gore-Tex boots. Feet stayed good and warm - that's what I call not going numb or hurting, when it's really cold out - the whole time I was up and about. My feet were warm the rest of the time too, except for Sunday morning
    "Physics is the only true science. All else is stamp collecting." - J. J. Thompson

  4. #24
    Senior Member FanaticFringer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Lawrenceville, Ga
    Hammock
    JRB Bear Mtn. Bridge
    Tarp
    BlackCat/JRB 11x10
    Insulation
    Pad(s)/JRB Quilts
    Posts
    2,424
    Images
    34
    I had a few thoughts about those Everest climbers and the amputations that awated them on their decent.
    "Every day above ground is a good day"

  5. #25
    Senior Member The Breeze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    golden valley nc.
    Posts
    215
    Images
    15

    cold feet

    boiled a bottle of water before bed .tossed it to the foot had on toe socks toasty warm all night. the next morning poored out the water, boy did the steam roll. hope that helps. ps. thats why pandaman got so hot he said he was not use to that much heat.
    Bear bait what??? Your It!!!!!!!!

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    3,565
    Images
    57
    Look into the VB socks. I haven't put them to the full test yet. But just walking around my house with them on I got pretty warm.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  7. #27
    slowhike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Hammock
    DIY, gathered end , w/ spreader
    Tarp
    DIY w/ pull-outs
    Insulation
    DAM/ HG Incubator
    Suspension
    Webbing & rings
    Posts
    10,596
    Images
    319
    people who don't have such problems w/ cold feet tend to disagree (because they aren't having the same degree of problem), but i got a pair of insulated boots that i wear on really cold trips.
    they have allowed me to enjoy the cold much better.
    my feet still get cold standing around camp for long periods but not nearly as bad as before.
    when they do, that's when i do what breeze said... boil water to put in a bottle.
    and what was said about tight socks & long johns restricting circulation is true too.
    and i have come to realize that keeping my legs warm is important to keeping my feet warm. if my legs are a little cool (even though not really uncomfortable) seems to me, that's going to cause the blood going to my feet to cool a little more before it gets to my feet.
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    3,565
    Images
    57
    My problem was that while hiking I am fine with one pair of socks. By the time I get to camp my feet are usually wet or damp. Then I mess around camp for an hour or so cooking and setting up. I would change my socks right before I got into my hammock to keep my sleeping clothes dry. By that time they were pretty cold and took a long time to warm up.

    I guess my point is that if they are chilled before you get in, then they are going to take a long time to warm up. Or you need to change your sleeping insulation around to account for it.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  9. #29
    slowhike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Hammock
    DIY, gathered end , w/ spreader
    Tarp
    DIY w/ pull-outs
    Insulation
    DAM/ HG Incubator
    Suspension
    Webbing & rings
    Posts
    10,596
    Images
    319
    yeah, maybe changing into dry socks as soon as you get into camp, then because your wet shoes are going to get those damp, change into another dry pair when you get into your hammock.
    but then you would have to sleep w/ the damp socks to dry them<g>.
    the article from BPL.com talked about having your routine down to where you get into your sleeping bag before you get chilled.
    of course these are ultralight & super ultralight (SUL) hikers, but i can glean from their methods even if i never get to the point they do<g>.
    they talk about from the time you get to where you are going to camp, having your shelter set up & being in dry clothes & in your bag with a pot of water starting to heat in about 5 minutes. you probably would have already got water & used the bathroom before you stopped.
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  10. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    3,565
    Images
    57
    Yeah, I really don't like to eat in my sleeping clothes or hammock. That will probibly change at some point this summer.

    When it gets dark later I am starting to like stopping and cooking diner before I get to camp. I have a snack in camp and I am good to go. This way I don't need as much water in camp or time outside my shelter.

    It's harder for me to do that when it gets dark at 6pm. I can usually only sleep for 6 or 8 hours.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •