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  1. #11
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eugeneius View Post
    I guess I'm of the mindset that I desire as little outside human involvement as possible in my outdoor experiences, we get enough "assistance" and "stewardship" in our busy live. I hardly see groups or individuals, let alone SAR (Lord willing) or DEC, or rangers out ON the trail or in the backcountry in most instances in New Mexico so that experience Timber had on the mountain struck me as odd. I probably wrongly assume that all hikers are educated in mountain safety and practice in general so I can see the need for wilderness staff in high traffic wilderness areas where the likelihood of more inexperienced incidents occur. The Adirondacks are amazing though, I would love to make a trip out there in my lifetime
    Yes, there is a great dif in what you experience in NM and anywhere back east. It's just a matter of population density. I wouldn't be surprised if there were 50 or 100 times more people within hiking/climbing distance of any of these Adirondack peaks compared to the peaks near where you are. So, simply due to crowd control and the effects such numbers can have on the environment, I would expect to have a lot more ranger activity.

    In 20 plus years of hiking in Wyoming's Wind River wilderness areas, I have never seen a ranger. I'm pretty sure I can say the same for all the other Western wilderness areas I have hiked, unless inside a national park. Even on last years week long hike inside Olympic NP, we only saw 1 park ranger that we knew of, though there were several times more people than we were used to outside of NPs. In fact, it is not uncommon for me to hike all day in the winds ( in the fall anyway) and not see another person other than whoever is with me. It is almost beyond all odds that I might pick one of many dozens of peaks to climb or scramble up, and find a ranger at all, much less one directing 10 or more people. But I would expect this is the north east peaks.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  2. #12
    Member eugeneius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    Yes, there is a great dif in what you experience in NM and anywhere back east. It's just a matter of population density. I wouldn't be surprised if there were 50 or 100 times more people within hiking/climbing distance of any of these Adirondack peaks compared to the peaks near where you are. So, simply due to crowd control and the effects such numbers can have on the environment, I would expect to have a lot more ranger activity.

    In 20 plus years of hiking in Wyoming's Wind River wilderness areas, I have never seen a ranger. I'm pretty sure I can say the same for all the other Western wilderness areas I have hiked, unless inside a national park. Even on last years week long hike inside Olympic NP, we only saw 1 park ranger that we knew of, though there were several times more people than we were used to outside of NPs. In fact, it is not uncommon for me to hike all day in the winds ( in the fall anyway) and not see another person other than whoever is with me. It is almost beyond all odds that I might pick one of many dozens of peaks to climb or scramble up, and find a ranger at all, much less one directing 10 or more people. But I would expect this is the north east peaks.
    Where did you hike in Olympic National Park? I lived in Port Angeles, WA for 4 years with my family right on the Puget Sound at the base of the Olympic Mountains, northeast of Mt. Olympus and such, we were a stone throw away from the Hoh Rainforest which as you probably know is the only RAINFOREST in North America, that is the most spectacular wilderness, hands down, I hiked there year round as a youth and loved the isolation. I want to go back there soooo bad. I've been reading about Wyoming lately, I really didn't know how diverse the ecosystems within the state are, the Tetons look amazing, the climate looks much like Northern New Mexico, dry and arid, frigid winters, and hot summers, high altitude desert and alpine regions as well, very cool!
    [....] Our remnants of wilderness will yield bigger values to the nation's character and health than they will to its pocketbook, and to destroy them will be to admit that the latter are the only values that interest us.

  3. #13
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Unhappy

    Quote Originally Posted by eugeneius View Post
    Where did you hike in Olympic National Park? I lived in Port Angeles, WA for 4 years with my family right on the Puget Sound at the base of the Olympic Mountains, northeast of Mt. Olympus and such, we were a stone throw away from the Hoh Rainforest which as you probably know is the only RAINFOREST in North America, that is the most spectacular wilderness, hands down, I hiked there year round as a youth and loved the isolation. I want to go back there soooo bad. I've been reading about Wyoming lately, I really didn't know how diverse the ecosystems within the state are, the Tetons look amazing, the climate looks much like Northern New Mexico, dry and arid, frigid winters, and hot summers, high altitude desert and alpine regions as well, very cool!
    Well, we hiked in your Hoh rain forest! We set up camp the first night about 3 miles in- we didn't get started on the trail until almost sun down. I can't remember the name of the camp. My step son and friend son set up on the dry river bed with a tent, and after supper my fellow hanger and I went back into the woods about 1/4 mile until we found some trees small enough to hang from, and set up our HHs. That was the night I set up my SS without a space blanket and had so much condensation by morning- it was real foggy. But still, I was warm, passed right out and had one of the most peaceful sleeps ever. The next day we hiked in to Olympic Guard station and set up a base camp there for a couple of days, day hiking out from there. It was an incredible place. We also got up to the Austin pass area between Baker and Shuksan. I climbed Baker back in 88, and in 89 I did a winter backcountry ski trip, staying in snow caves, on Baker. Simply a mind blowing area, WA is. Ocean, rain forests and BIG glaciers. Being at sea level in warm lush emerald green forests, while gazing up at near by 14,400 ice covered peaks like Rainier. What more can be said? No wonder you miss it!

    But, Wyoming's Wind Rivers are a wonder land, also. Really much like NM in many ways, but a bit dif also. Pretty well forested between 8000 and 11000 feet, above timberline from about 11000 to 13,800. Despite global warming and long droughts, still significant glaciers, especially in the north and on the north east slopes. Truly spectacular, rugged, jagged peaks are every where. For example, the Cirque of the Towers is world famous, but one of many incredible areas for those that love WILD mountains and WILD wilderness. But the main thing is the amount of streams and lakes in seemingly endless numbers, most filled with trout. Often, every few miles you hike, you come to yet another lake ( there are many hundreds of large lakes, probably way over a thousand counting the smaller ponds). Often this lake will have one or more jagged peaks rising out of it, not infrequently with it's own little glacier on it. And not infrequently, you will have this lake all to yourself and your group. It is a great place to hike of trail navigating with map and compass, or GPS. I think you would love it. It is different than WA and not as lush, and not as much diversity of terrain, but still definitely has it's own charms.

    Of course, the Tetons are even more ( or at least, as) spectacular. I have back packed there once, skied and just visited there many other times. They are incredible, for sure. But the Winds are more wilderness like, and have a far greater variety of lakes and streams. Plus, you don't have all of the NP regulations.
    Last edited by BillyBob58; 08-09-2008 at 08:10.
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timber View Post
    ..............................
    I hadidn't brought a change of clothes so I slept a bit damp, but comfortable enough for a good night of sleep.

    Sunday was basically the same, weather wise. Packed up camp and was on the trail by 6:30am. Rain started at 7:30am and continued until I was back at the Trailhead at 11am. All things considered, it was a great trip with lots of memories.
    Hey Timber,
    BTW,great post and pics. It looks like you just used your HH as directed by HH- that is with the stock tarp attached to the hammock suspension rather than tied to the trees. Apparently, this worked A-OK for you in the rain? Which model hammock did you have? Explorer, Backpacker, other?
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  5. #15
    New Member Timber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    ... It looks like you just used your HH as directed by HH- that is with the stock tarp attached to the hammock suspension rather than tied to the trees. Apparently, this worked A-OK for you in the rain? Which model hammock did you have? Explorer, Backpacker, other?
    Yep...you called it right. I'm using the stock HH setup (with the only change being caribiners added to the tree straps).

    If it's windy or raining when I'm setting up the HH, I'll tie the tarp directly to the tree with extra line that I pack. If the weather is calm and not raining, I'll attach the tarp directly to the suspension per HH instructions.

    The stock setup worked well, even in the rain. You'll notice in the pictures (first post), I have the tarp pitched fairly steep, so even though it sags a tiny bit when I climb in, the water doesn't pool and runs right off. The steepness would have also kept out any wind driven rain. I mentioned "sleeping damp" because my clothes were already wet when I climbed in the HH.

    The hammock I'm using is a 2008 Expedition A-sym.
    Tim

  6. #16
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timber View Post
    Yep...you called it right. I'm using the stock HH setup (with the only change being caribiners added to the tree straps).

    If it's windy or raining when I'm setting up the HH, I'll tie the tarp directly to the tree with extra line that I pack. If the weather is calm and not raining, I'll attach the tarp directly to the suspension per HH instructions.

    The stock setup worked well, even in the rain. You'll notice in the pictures (first post), I have the tarp pitched fairly steep, so even though it sags a tiny bit when I climb in, the water doesn't pool and runs right off. The steepness would have also kept out any wind driven rain. I mentioned "sleeping damp" because my clothes were already wet when I climbed in the HH.

    The hammock I'm using is a 2008 Expedition A-sym.
    Good to know it worked again! In case you don't already know:You can help that sag a bit by either hanging weighted stuff sacks from the tarp lateral tie outs ( from the mitten hooks), or probably just from adding elastics to the tarps tie outs. As well as by tightening the side pull outs, causing a little sag in the middle along the ridge line, BEFORE you tighten the head and foot ends on the suspension.
    Bill
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

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