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  1. #1
    Senior Member hikerman2000's Avatar
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    Getting my moms sewing machine! Help!!

    ... My question to you experienced DIYers is this. What is a good beginners "project" that would introduce me to the world of thread-injecting?

    Another question I have about sewing stuff is... Can I re-sew a patch I ripped on my polyester webbing with a standard machine? I was clipping my biner to the permanent loop on one of my whoopie slings while hanging from my converted swing set to hammock stand. Below is a picture of the rip...



    I'm getting a pretty nice machine from mom, who used to be an avid seamstress, so I have a great teacher... My goal is to become proficient enough to earn a bit of $$$ on the side from my job as a HS science teacher. Nothing to live off, but enough to save in order to fund an eventual ALASKAN adventure;-) I'm giving myself a year or so before I try and make quality gear that I could sell...

    Regardless of my success, I'm ready to dive in and have some patient fun...

    Thx
    Last edited by hikerman2000; 05-27-2012 at 12:18.

  2. #2
    Burning at both ends Dblcorona's Avatar
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    I would say stuff sacks or a hammock make great first projects.

    Depends on the machine with the webbing. I sew webbing with mine no problem.
    "We don't stop hiking because we grow old,
    we grow old because we stop hiking."

    -- Finis Mitchell,

  3. #3
    Senior Member hikerman2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dblcorona View Post
    I would say stuff sacks or a hammock make great first projects.

    Depends on the machine with the webbing. I sew webbing with mine no problem.
    Sounds logical. Was thinking along those lines... Thx!

  4. #4
    Ramblinrev's Avatar
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    Put an old nasty needle in the machine (not a new good one) and find some graph paper. Take all the thread off the machine (bobbin too) and follow the lines on the graph paper. The needle holes will tell you how good you are doing. When you can follow the graph paper to your satisfaction thread the beasty up with a new needle and follow the stripes on a old shirt or scrap fabric. If your mom is/was an avid seamstress she's got more scrap than you can shake a stick at.

    Then move on to stuff sacks. That is the fastest way to master the learning curve if you want to move toward professional quality goods.
    I may be slow... But I sure am gimpy.

    "Bless you child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way."
    Mrs. Loftus to Huck Finn

    We Don't Sew... We Make Gear! video series

    Important thread injector guidelines especially for Newbies

    Bobbin Tension - A Personal Viewpoint

  5. #5
    Senior Member hikerman2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramblinrev View Post
    Put an old nasty needle in the machine (not a new good one) and find some graph paper. Take all the thread off the machine (bobbin too) and follow the lines on the graph paper. The needle holes will tell you how good you are doing. When you can follow the graph paper to your satisfaction thread the beasty up with a new needle and follow the stripes on a old shirt or scrap fabric. If your mom is/was an avid seamstress she's got more scrap than you can shake a stick at.

    Then move on to stuff sacks. That is the fastest way to master the learning curve if you want to move toward professional quality goods.
    Yes! Totally makes sense... Can't wait! Graph paper here I come...

  6. #6
    dragon360's Avatar
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    First projects consisted of stuff sacks, ridgeline organizers, hammocks and ix quilts all around the same time. Great fun and pretty simple and straightforward projects.
    The key to immortality is first living a life worth remembering. - St. Augustine

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  7. #7
    Senior Member hikerman2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dragon360 View Post
    First projects consisted of stuff sacks, ridgeline organizers, hammocks and ix quilts all around the same time. Great fun and pretty simple and straightforward projects.
    Indeed

  8. #8
    Senior Member Big Jim Mac's Avatar
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    My first project was a cover for the machine. Then I made a ridge line organizer. Then a hammock. Then I sewed a second layer to my hammock and screwed it up, LOL. Have since made another hammock and a tarp. It gets easier!

  9. #9
    Detail Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramblinrev View Post
    Put an old nasty needle in the machine (not a new good one) and find some graph paper. Take all the thread off the machine (bobbin too) and follow the lines on the graph paper. The needle holes will tell you how good you are doing. When you can follow the graph paper to your satisfaction thread the beasty up with a new needle and follow the stripes on a old shirt or scrap fabric. If your mom is/was an avid seamstress she's got more scrap than you can shake a stick at.

    Then move on to stuff sacks. That is the fastest way to master the learning curve if you want to move toward professional quality goods.
    Cool idea! That will be some good practice for my daugther.

    Hikerman -- When learning to sew, I find it helpful to think of it in two parts. One is learning to use the machine proficiently, and how to maintain it (cleaning, oiling, thread tension, etc). The second is how to assemble the parts for your desired outcome. They work together, obviously, but are distinct IMHO. Start with stuff sacs, hammocks, tarp skins, ridgeline organizers. From there the sky's the limit. Be patient.

  10. #10
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    Pot Holders are easy to get started, round, square, triangle. Take something cotton, old shirts, sheets, towels. Make a sandwich, I use towels in the center of my potholders. Just sew around the edge and you will have a trusty little pot holder. Then add some Bias Tape to your next pot holder, which will be a challenge.

    Now you are ready to sew on something more challenging, like nylon, stuff sacks are great.

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