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  1. #11
    Redoleary's Avatar
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    I iron it all the time. Low temp but not on an ironing board but on a piece of oak. This lets you crease it. It still doesn't lay down and behave like cotton or something but I'm never in such a rush that I don't have time to make a proper straight seam, and ironing sil helps me do this. YMMV.
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    RED

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  2. #12
    Senior Member WetRivrRat's Avatar
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    Jul 2012
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    I'll admit - I've ironed it before... Won't do it again -

    I grew up in a dressmaker's studio (mom's), and I did most of the ironing for the family and her shop. So, I knew all the 'rules' and followed them well enough.

    But what I don't have is patience - So by all means, ymmv; but its not practically worth it in my opinion.
    The extremes of the process are simply this:
    Iron too cool - No change in fabric (no desired creases, etc)
    Iron too hot - Meltdown of sil or nylon (depending on temp) - almost always would result in a residue being left on your iron (too many bad 'accidents' as a kid learning what temps did what to what fabrics)
    Iron too dry - Meltdown of sil or nylon (depending on temp)
    Iron too wet - Shrinkage of fibers - not a meltdown, but just a shrinkage - you're pushing the material to the edge of its limit due to the humidity, and it begins to tighten up on itself and the weave

    Finding the Goldilocks temp/humidity is not worth my time!
    But something that may help you in your journey is layering the material in a natural fabric that will transfer the heat and the humidity with out direct contact to the man-made fabric.
    We all know of the original "Walk off the war" thru-hike - but, check out these guys, they're helping folks 'walk off the war' today -
    Donate to help fund gear for the warriors who are coming back home and need help walking off the war!
    WarriorHike.com

  3. #13
    New Member
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    Sep 2012
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    abbotsford
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    I use a smooth closet door for cutting and ironing each fold. It is capable of holding a crease over centre and much easier than marking the fabric. I highly recommend trying it on a hard surface using a low setting.

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