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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtwheels View Post
    ...I thought after my initial experience of making a tablecloth hammock......one of my whipped ends slipped on the 1st attempt....So seasoned hammock experts, good idea, good application of material or a newby looking to solve a problem that doesn't really exist?...
    I'd say "a newby looking to solve a problem that doesn't really exist". You simply didn't whip the ends tight enough or use enough wraps on the first attempt.

    I like using Coleman (crappy) Utility Cord. It is similar to the gutted paracord suggested by hppyfngy and has just the right amount of stretch to get nice and tight. I use 7-8 wraps.

    Another hint...using the whipping method you show (my favorite), don't cut the ends off when you're done. That way you can easily pull the whipping back apart and reuse the same cord as many times as you like.

  2. #12
    dirtwheels's Avatar
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    Hey, I've been guilty of that in many areas!

    As I've read the replies here I had been thinking about pulling both ends out of the opposite end and loosely tying whatever excess length is required to be able to reuse.

    Quote Originally Posted by gmcttr View Post
    I'd say "a newby looking to solve a problem that doesn't really exist". You simply didn't whip the ends tight enough or use enough wraps on the first attempt.

    I like using Coleman (crappy) Utility Cord. It is similar to the gutted paracord suggested by hppyfngy and has just the right amount of stretch to get nice and tight. I use 7-8 wraps.

    Another hint...using the whipping method you show (my favorite), don't cut the ends off when you're done. That way you can easily pull the whipping back apart and reuse the same cord as many times as you like.

  3. #13
    seadad9903's Avatar
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    I also use the whipping you showed in the first post, with paracord. When I have whipped lines in the past I would leave the ends long and tie them in a surgeon's knot on the top of the whipping. Haven't done it that way on a hammock but it won't hurt anything and give you a visual that nothing has happened to the whipping
    i totally take back all those times i didn't want to nap when i was a kid

  4. #14
    New Member Apis's Avatar
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    Mason's line. Whip it about a dozen wraps (never 13...). Bob's-your-uncle.
    Transportation for Hiram Farm

    Two Wheels Good, Four Wheels Bad

  5. #15
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    OP:

    Thanks for this superb reference. A pleasure to see excellence in this that is standard for maintainable systems of circuits.

    http://www.hnsa.org/doc/cabling/part5.htm

    The specialized cord you later pointed to is........specialized,and interesting for its characteristics, specifically cushioning of the jacket and absent over-strength in the core.

    Over-kill isn't exactly what this is, though. Its uniform excellence that is best appreciated in number. Also, to be honest, old-skool, from before the invention and further development of hook-and-loop (eg Velcro) ties, which can be very neatly applied, very strong, and now very inexpensive.

  6. #16
    DivaB's Avatar
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    Very interesting read. Who would've known 2 years ago that I would ever need or care about information regarding cord, braided nylon, proper whipping, lashing and so on? Certainly not myself

  7. #17
    dirtwheels's Avatar
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    You're most welcome. I still work around the communication industry and Velcro is a good product but wire ties particularly Thomas & Betts, nylon ties dominates the market and their rounded head with the metal tab are by far the best on the market.


    Quote Originally Posted by DemostiX View Post
    OP:

    Thanks for this superb reference. A pleasure to see excellence in this that is standard for maintainable systems of circuits.

    http://www.hnsa.org/doc/cabling/part5.htm

    The specialized cord you later pointed to is........specialized,and interesting for its characteristics, specifically cushioning of the jacket and absent over-strength in the core.

    Over-kill isn't exactly what this is, though. Its uniform excellence that is best appreciated in number. Also, to be honest, old-skool, from before the invention and further development of hook-and-loop (eg Velcro) ties, which can be very neatly applied, very strong, and now very inexpensive.

  8. #18
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    Admittedly, I've never whipped the end of a hammock… but something came to mind as I was reading the posts here: Nylon absorbs water & water vapor, and swells/elongates as a result. Therefore, no matter how tightly it's wrapped, it will loosen somewhat under high humidity conditions. Wouldn't polyester be a better material for whipping? It isn't affected by water.

    PS: A freebie… because nylon does what it does with water, if you soak your weed trimmer line overnight, it'll not be as brittle and therefore last longer when trimming. You're welcome.

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