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  1. #1
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    Hammock Stand 2 poles and cord

    I originally posted in the turtle stand forum but moved to a new thread to answer questions since this is not turtle stand...just another stand idea.

    Avoid carying anything except cord. Find dead limbs for poles.

    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/v...ls&videoid=707

    Do you have details of the ground fixings or a photo to help visualise there set-up please?
    Alan
    Last edited by BruceHawkins; 06-21-2012 at 23:56.

  2. #2
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    The anchors are 1 inch diameter limbs 18" in length. Cord was tied to the middle, then driven fully underground like any tent stake at right angles to the expected load.

    This buries the limb and the cord. The cord is then pulled tight which is then 90 degree angle to the anchor stake/limb. The cord then cuts through the dirt under pressure. The force doesn't pull the stake out because the force is on the middle of the stake not the end. The anchor does rotate it either breaks the limb or pulls the entire 1 " x 18" through the dirt or sand or whatever. There isn't that much force because the main support limbs are at an angle beneath the hammock which transfers much of the angled force to the ground via the main support poles. The main support poles are long and the anchor cord attached high so the force of the hammock which is attached lower benefits from a lever like effect reducing the force on the ground anchors.

  3. #3
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    Bruce
    Thanks for the response. I'm experimenting with recoverable Iowa ground anchors (which I understand are used in trapping) and there is a thread on here about them. My application is for canoeing trips so weight and bulk are not major concerns. The poles will be with me in the form of drilled aluminium canoeing poles. I will try your minimal equipment approach as my soil in the English Midlands is not too 'loose' and sounds very simple to impliment.
    Regards Alan

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