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  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Hammock
    Hennessy Explorer Assym/Eno Single
    Tarp
    Hennesy Hex/Kelty
    Insulation
    Mummy bag for now.
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    101

    Another noob and basic questions

    I have read and re-read this forum until I think it has all start to run together. A variety of searches have turned up consistent yet conflicting points.

    I'm getting ready to order up the gear to convert to hammock camping (naturally I discover this the night after buying a nice new solo tent) and have spent some time crashing in a friends Eno singlenest at our recent camping trip. He had no idea about hanging, either.

    Until I found this forum I was set to order the One Link system in a double-nest. For reference, 6'2, 205'ish, tall and reasonably thin.

    Uses will be via motorcycle and kayaks mostly around east TN and western NC (greetings from Knoxville). Overall weight is not much of an issue but size is.

    I camp in virtually all kinds of weather from 100 degree dry heat to snow to 'Toto, come back in the house so we can land.' The weirder the weather the more likely to find me camping in it.

    Common consensus (and I may be wrong) seems to be:

    Don't even think of having your significant other camp in the same sleeping bag even if it is a double-nest..

    Get the Double-nest, (though I can't see myself carving sides off of anything)
    dump the stock suspension for the whoopie's,
    skip the One link and it's bugnet/tarp combo and hunt up others meant to go to different tents.

    I'm really getting the impression that the one-link is not a good way to go, a total waste of money for things that would be dumped after the first night, or am I totally missing something here? On top of that finding a decent underquilt seems to be a requirement and sleeping in a mummybag is evidently a horrible thing to do with or without a matt/pad.


    Keep in mind that I look to quality, use my gear frequently and realize that quality isn't usually the most expensive. I just retired one of two tents bought in '89 as it finally decided to start leaking and the zippers pulled out on the same camping trip. The 2nd (2 man) tent is still as-new and again, bought her in '89. I'd like to get similar performance and longevity out of a hammock system and as simple as they are I can see changing out things like the rain fly's more than anything else. Maybe the bug nets if they get cut or damaged?

    Suggestions are welcome. Anyone around this area willing to teach a noob some tricks is also welcome!

    Last stupid question: The Eno's are gathered-end hammocks, correct???

    ...and yes, I did go through probably 200+ threads virtually from beginning to end including the Shug vid's. That guy needs help, please don't get him any!
    Last edited by AdventureMyk; 07-11-2012 at 23:05.

  2. #2
    Bubba's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.7 SL
    Tarp
    WB Superfly
    Insulation
    WB and UGQ
    Suspension
    Whoopies or Straps
    Posts
    5,361
    Images
    57
    Yes there is a lot of info here and you'll get many recommendations. For starters, the ENO one link system is really not for any serious outdoor endeavours IMO.

    The ENO hammocks are great and my first hammock was an ENO that I still use for relaxing and indeed some people use them in the back country. It is a gathered end hammock as opposed to bridge hammocks or spreader bar hammocks.

    The ENO tarps are heavy and offer less coverage than other lighter tarps and the stock suspension offered is also heavy and bulky.

    Using a pad is fine but eventually you may find an underquilt more comfortable.

    Two people in a hammock is ok for a nap but an entire night is very difficult IMO.

    I suggest getting something with an integrated bugnet and a larger tarp to offer better all year coverage. I use and can recommend a Warbonnet Blackbird hammock and a Superfly tarp. One of the double layer models will help keep a pad in place.

    There are many other options out there so I'll leave it to others to chime in.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  3. #3
    titanium_hiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Wimmera, Australia
    Hammock
    DIY speer type
    Tarp
    OES Maccat
    Insulation
    JRB Nest+ORM
    Suspension
    Webbing straps
    Posts
    746
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    18
    hammocks aren't tents.

    Good luck with your search!

    Yeah, two people should really hang next to each other (still that close feeling) under the same tarp from the same trees, instead of trying one sleeping bag and a hammock.

    Look at the Top quilt thing too- easier to maneuver than a sleeping bag in a hammock.

    Pay attention to your under insulation too.

    TH
    my hammock gear weights total: 2430g (~86oz)
    Winter: total 2521 (~89oz)
    (see my profile for detailed weights)

    gram counter, not gram weenie!

  4. #4
    old4hats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Ball Ground, Ga.
    Posts
    1,869
    A bomb proof rig can be found in the Clark NX 250. It has under pockets which can be filled with insulation, or you can use an under quilt. The bug net and a weather shield are built in, a rain fly comes with it and is large enough, but can be upgraded to a larger one, and even with the larger rain fly, comes in around 4 lb. It will last a long, long time, plenty tough. Happy hanging from the north end of Ga..

  5. #5
    Burning at both ends Dblcorona's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Novi, MI
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.7 DBL
    Tarp
    HG Cuben
    Insulation
    Sleeping BearTQ/UQ
    Suspension
    Straps and Slings
    Posts
    1,136
    Images
    18
    Without really answering your questions, because there are so many combinations and everybody has a favorite, your best bet is to hit a local hang, or try and get some locals together for maybe an overnighter. Than you could check out different rigs. And don't let anybody fool you, one of our favorite things to do is show off gear.
    "We don't stop hiking because we grow old,
    we grow old because we stop hiking."

    -- Finis Mitchell,

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Fairfax, Va
    Hammock
    HH Explorer Hex Fly
    Tarp
    Hex
    Insulation
    Big Agnes Ins Pad
    Suspension
    Slings & Whoopies
    Posts
    113
    >The Eno's are gathered-end hammocks, correct???

    Yes, they have a channel sewn into the ends and a short cord looped around that is tied to their heavy biner.

    I have a ENO-DN, a GT Parachute Single and HH Explorer Dlx. I like all three. But I wish I had taken the advice of a friend who said you should borrow some of mine and try them out on a trip or two. I originally purchased a ENO-SN which I thought would be ok, it was, but just OK. I am much happier with my DN. I mostly take the ENO on canoe trips where packing space is at a premium.

    I made whoopies within a week of getting my hammocks and love that suspension. Between the tree straps and the whoopies I can span a great distance. I also made a Fronkey Bug net to use with my ENO-DN.

  7. #7
    harrellt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Arkadelphia, AR
    Hammock
    Den Mother DIY
    Tarp
    Superfly/Noah's 12
    Insulation
    leighlo UQ-DIY TQ
    Suspension
    whoopies
    Posts
    376
    Images
    13
    It's been my experience that we often set out to find "the right" hammock for ourselves only to see something shinier the next day. That is to say, you'll start with the ENO DN (not a bad way to go, it's my personal favorite so far). You'll get the suspension set up the way you like it and have it dialed in perfectly.

    Then you read another trip report here and decide that maybe you want to take a look at a Black Bird b/c it has an integrated bug net and that cool shelf thingy. Might as well give that one a shot too, telling yourself that "If I have more than one hammock in my gear closet, I can let a friend try it out and maybe get them hooked too". Be careful, you're on the edge now.

    Then you go to a group hang and see all the cool gear that fellow hangers have made with their own two hands and Nana's old sewing machine. At this point, throw your hands in the air, go to your gear closet grab your back yard hammock (b/c you now also have a favorite just for lounging in the yard whilst you grill) and think happily about the next hammock you're going to try.

    Enjoy the trip!

  8. #8
    New Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Hammock
    ENO Doublenest
    Tarp
    WB Superfly
    Insulation
    HG 40 Incubator
    Suspension
    whoopie slings
    Posts
    3
    I purchased the ENO One link system thinking it would be easier to just get everthing all at once (I seem to loose patience when I get my mind set on something I want/need). With that said, I've already swapped out the suspension for whoopie slings, added an adjustable ridgeline, and went with the warbonnet traveler net. The first time I went backpacking with it I used a sleeping bag and thermarest pad under me. Stayed warm the entire night, but you do tend to slide around on the pad since it is only a single layer hammock. Ended up selling some mountain biking gear and got and UQ and TQ from Hammock Gear, super easy to set up and kept me warm all night. I don't have an integrated bug net, and I kinda prefer it that way. I like to set it up in the backyard and just relax and read sometimes, just really simple to use, plus air doesn't move that well through the bug net. On that note, I use an Off Clip on hanging from my ridgeline and that moves the air around inside the bug net.

    IMHO, If you do end up getting the ENO DN, buy everything separate and get good quality stuff from the start, so you don't have to replace everything like i'm doing.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Hammock
    Hennessy Explorer Assym/Eno Single
    Tarp
    Hennesy Hex/Kelty
    Insulation
    Mummy bag for now.
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    101
    Quote Originally Posted by Bubba View Post
    the ENO one link system is really not for any serious outdoor endeavours IMO.

    The ENO tarps are heavy and offer less coverage than other lighter tarps and the stock suspension offered is also heavy and bulky.

    I suggest getting something with an integrated bugnet and a larger tarp to offer better all year coverage. I use and can recommend a Warbonnet Blackbird hammock and a Superfly tarp. One of the double layer models will help keep a pad in place.
    I was starting to get the impression the One-Link is akin to a very nice and reasonably inexpensive way to get into the sport, much like the 'starter kits' that most other sports have. "Here is your base set-up, now once you get into it and find your niche you will know what direction you want to go. That sort of thing."

    From the variety of reviews and the one time I played with the friends Eno with the Slap Straps I could say that I'd be ordering the full whoopie system tomorrow right along with whatever hammock I choose. Not only did his slap straps stretch like crazy in half an hour of laying in them but the loops were too far apart to be of much use in setting it up.

    What would be a good tarp that might, if needed, be big enough to park a motorcycle under? Come to think of it, I could get the one-link, pick up a better tarp (recommendations are welcome! Lot of rain and steady winds in the Appalachians), then use the included tarp from the One-Link for the motorcycle.

    Quote Originally Posted by titanium_hiker View Post
    hammocks aren't tents.
    Pay attention to your under insulation too.
    Definitely not tents and one of the things i'm looking forward to. My last 5-day camping adventure started dry, got a massive downpour for 30 hours straight and we managed to keep the water to a mere 3" inside the tent (6-7" outside... and yes, I was in a higher area but the sandy flat ground had managed to settle with the rain. Whoops? A hammock set-up may have been quite a bit dryer though frankly at 23 years old that tent was well past it's prime.

    For mid-summer to early fall camping is it likely to need under insulation if the temps are typically in the 50's or warmer? (assume no pad but using a sleeping bag)

    Quote Originally Posted by DerNageler View Post
    I like all three. But I wish I had taken the advice of a friend who said you should borrow some of mine and try them out on a trip or two.
    That would be a fantastic idea save for one problem that I always seem to have: I'm the adventurous innovator of my group of eclectic friends; IE: I'm the first to do or try all the new stuff. If it works decently they get around to investing in the gear.

    Quote Originally Posted by harrellt View Post
    It's been my experience that we often set out to find "the right" hammock for ourselves only to see something shinier the next day. That is to say, you'll start with the ENO DN (not a bad way to go, it's my personal favorite so far). You'll get the suspension set up the way you like it and have it dialed in perfectly.

    Then you read another trip report here and decide that maybe you want to take a look at a Black Bird b/c it has an integrated bug net and that cool shelf thingy. Might as well give that one a shot too, telling yourself that "If I have more than one hammock in my gear closet, I can let a friend try it out and maybe get them hooked too". Be careful, you're on the edge now.

    Then you go to a group hang and see all the cool gear that fellow hangers have made with their own two hands and Nana's old sewing machine. At this point, throw your hands in the air, go to your gear closet grab your back yard hammock (b/c you now also have a favorite just for lounging in the yard whilst you grill) and think happily about the next hammock you're going to try. Enjoy the trip!
    Harrell, have we met before? You know me so well!!! <rofl> I do not think I would prefer the integrated bug net. I'd rather have a regular hammock and be able to throw the net over it or not.

    As for the rest maybe that's how I ended up as a single guy with 3 cars, 3 kayaks, 2 motorcycles, had the 2 jet ski's... more fun to do it with friends but the friends don't usually have the capital for the gear and are not willing to 'buy before they try.' Grrrr... I always started simple...

    Oh, and I don't have any nana's left but do still have my own sewing machine and scarily enough, know how to use it!

    Ever notice one can have too many hobbies???


    Thank you to everyone who has responded. I'm still doing a bit of homework and will be attacking the credit card most likely tomorrow eve. Will take a look at the info on the NX-250 while I'm at it. I do want a system that's hammock-first and that can be kept as a hammock then the other stuff used (or not) when needed. That is one thing that drew me to the One-Link in the first place, yet I'd rather have the ridgeline inside the bug net so I can use it to hang stuff (lights, book, etc.).

    Again, thank you very much and I may have more random questions.

    - Myk

    P.S. Below is an idea of how I tend to start my multi-day camping adventures...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
    Senior Member ragnall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Hammock
    HH Exlporer UL
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    Toxaway
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    SS/Greylock3/Jarbr
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    AHE straps
    Posts
    227
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    2
    If you are not in a big rush, I would also recomend going to a group hang. Here in Middle Tennessee Neo will host hangs throughout the year. You might even find one closer to you. I think Spamburglar hinted that he was working on one. Everyone I have been to has had a nice turn out with a good variety of gear to look at.

    That being said I blindly bought a Hennessy before I knew about most of the other manufacturers, and am still 100% satisfied with my choice.

    Good luck with your search.
    Ragnall

    I see you posted a new reply while I was writing this. OK, so you won't make a group hang first, I still encourage you to go to a group hang when possible. Seeing how others set up/what they use has helped me improve/lighten my gear.
    Last edited by ragnall; 07-12-2012 at 10:38.

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