Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Hammock
    Grand Trunk Skeeter Beater Pro
    Tarp
    WL Tad Pole
    Suspension
    Tree Hugger
    Posts
    124

    Is It That Simple?

    I was looking at some under quilts and everything. Got to thinking, is it simple to make as it looks? For instance, take the shell materials and sew them together with a machine, then stuff the inside with goose down?

    I'm bored and letting my mind wonder about DIYs now. lol. .I need something to do on my down time.

  2. #2
    Moderator raiffnuke's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pittsfield, MA
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.1 DBL, Camo Hideaway, ENO DN
    Tarp
    WB Superfly
    Insulation
    HG Incubator
    Suspension
    Whoopies&DutchGear
    Posts
    5,335
    Images
    44
    That would work, however your down would most likely shift around and give you cold spots. Most down UQ designs place baffles in the quilt to even out the loft to a desired thickness for a desired temperature range, and minimize/stop the down from shifting around. Just my $.02

  3. #3
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Warbonnet ON!
    Tarp
    SuperFly or MacCat
    Insulation
    Yetis & Mambas
    Suspension
    Webbing and rings
    Posts
    13,919
    Images
    136
    Quilts are very simple to make with one huge exception IMO; baffles.

    I hate sewing baffles. Maybe "hate" isn't a strong enough term. I've made a few quilts over the years, but will no longer subject myself to the baffle process. I find it cheaper to simply buy from a manufacturer with way more skills than myself because I save money on my healthcare expenses. Punching walls, kicking sewing machines, drinking to excess; those things all add-up.
    Trust nobody!

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Hammock
    Grand Trunk Skeeter Beater Pro
    Tarp
    WL Tad Pole
    Suspension
    Tree Hugger
    Posts
    124
    Haha. Well, I was going to sew ridges like you see on jackets and some quilts. It'll look like a tube of down going the length and width of the material. I'm just wondering about temp rating would be like. I didn't think about the shiftiness of the down, but I hoped the way I would sew the baffle would help reduce it... Thanks for the inputs.

  5. #5
    Mr. Arrowhead pgibson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    SW Idaho
    Hammock
    Black Bird 1.1 Dbl
    Tarp
    AHE Shangi La
    Insulation
    KAQ Prototype
    Suspension
    AHE Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    4,542
    Sewn through baffles like you described will work but the spot where you sew through then has no insulation so at cool temps you will feel the cold. Depending on your tolerance for cold most folks can get to around 50ish. At least I have and been ok with some light thermal layers on.
    Arrowhead Equipment -- For all your hanging, backpacking and Ultralight Fishing gear needs.

    Free APEX Upgrade on Every Kick *** Quilt (KAQ)

    Now Offering FlameThower Down Gear And Tenkara Fishing gear
    Arrowhead-Equipment.com
    Tenkara-Fishing.com
    Visit AHE on Facebook Follow us on Twitter
    Sign Up for Arrowhead-Equipment Gear News: Click Here

  6. #6
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Warbonnet ON!
    Tarp
    SuperFly or MacCat
    Insulation
    Yetis & Mambas
    Suspension
    Webbing and rings
    Posts
    13,919
    Images
    136
    You are referring to "Sewn Through" baffles. That method will hold the down in place just fine. The problem is what raiffnuke pointed out; cold spots. That type of baffling system (for our quilts anyway) is generally reserved for summer use quilts, where cold spots aren't really an issue.

    You can also look into the "Karo" style of baffling. While I haven't tried this (see previous post ), since the baffles are basically boxes spread in a pattern, your stitching lines on the baffles are much shorter. This, in theory, would remove many of the headaches involved with full length baffles. There are a number of threads on the topic in the DIY and Underquilts sections. Do a search and confuse yourself even more.
    Trust nobody!

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Hammock
    Grand Trunk Skeeter Beater Pro
    Tarp
    WL Tad Pole
    Suspension
    Tree Hugger
    Posts
    124
    Hmm. Thanks. I'll go search and confuse myself.

  8. #8
    doogie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Birdsboro, PA
    Hammock
    DIY gathered end
    Tarp
    DIY hex or winter
    Insulation
    WL 3/4 UQ, DIY TQ
    Suspension
    UCR
    Posts
    826
    Images
    105
    You didn't say if you were looking at top or under quilts. I'm almost done my TQ. I will post photos and a description when I'm done. There are several good references on HF and elsewhere. Here are a few links

    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ead.php?t=4362
    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ad.php?t=51967
    http://home.comcast.net/~neatoman/qu...m#construction
    http://thegpsgeek.com/blog/archives/6

  9. #9
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    St.Louis, MO
    Hammock
    DIY Crinkle Taffeta
    Tarp
    Kelty Noah 12
    Insulation
    Pad & Blanket
    Suspension
    Descending Rings
    Posts
    34
    You could use a synthetic insulation like climashield apex. To make a quilt just sew three sides of the rectangle, turn inside out, stuff in the insulation, and sew the open edge. It doesn't need to quilted. It's very simple and surprisingly light weight. Especially for warmer temps. It is what I am going to do for my first diy quilt.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Hammock
    Grand Trunk Skeeter Beater Pro
    Tarp
    WL Tad Pole
    Suspension
    Tree Hugger
    Posts
    124
    I'm looking to do an under quilt. insulate from cold during fall, winter, and early spring month. I'll probably take my sleeping pad with me for added insulation in the winter months. I have a 15 degree rated Mountain Hardwear Ultralamina sleeping bag. I just wanted create a under quilt for times I can ditch the sleeping pad altogether and still stay plenty warm.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •