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  1. #11
    Senior Member
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    Most I've what I would know has been covered, but.....

    As a ski bum and what not in the middle of the Rockies, we ( backcountry partner and I ) used pulls a lot. Instead of buying( OVER PRICED!!!!! ) equipment I just got the long sled, couple lenths of 1/2 PVC, and a leather belt. Just drill a hole threw the belt and PVC ( at hips ) put the head of the bolt hip side and a wing nut on outer side of the PVC. At the attachment point of the PVC and sled do the same thing and make sure you tighten those bolts, so that there zero play as it drags behind you. Otherwise it will flip on top of you as you make dissents

  2. #12
    DuctTape's Avatar
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    Jul 2008
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    A lot of good advice already, I won't repeat it. I will say a few things about dead trees and stakes.

    As far as dead trees and limbs, dead trees look different than live ones even in winter as do dead limbs on live trees. Experience is the best teacher or having someone point them out to you in the field. I could describe them based on the tress in "my neck of the woods" but those descriptions may not be helpful. I would suggest you take note of trees in your area that you know are dead right now (and limbs) and then look at them in the winter to begin to develop your own sense.

    as far as tent stakes go, I will describe a few iterations of a method I use which allows for modifications based on environmental circumstances. In many cases in the winter, a tent stake from home cannot be used. I have been on trips where the ground is so frozen solid, nothing could be pounded in, also no snow to use. if you can use a stake, go for it, but if not. Here are some ideas:

    First, sticks, limbs and logs are your tie off options. In the deep snow, a larger limb can be buried with a branch sticking up to tie off to. You do not want to bury your guyline or you might not ever get it out. Bury the limb perpendicular to the guyline, stomp it down in the snow and tie off to the small branch sticking up. don't immediately tension the line, time is sometimes needed to "set the branch". In the frigid cold, with little to no snow (this is one time tent stakes will never work) a smaller stick can be used, but without snow to bury it, pour some water (or urinate) on it. In a short time it will be frozen to the ground. Again, choose a stick with a small branch sticking out which will be used to tie off to. If the snow is very light, and too deep to get to the ground, using some water on the larger branch might help it set. if not, some large logs can be used to weigh it down on both ends. There are many combinations of these ideas which can be used to solve the dilemma posed by the varying environmental scenarios. In general, don't rely on tent stakes. In many cases they won't work and if they do, they might end up being left there as they get frozen in.

    Just my 2 pesos.

  3. #13
    fourdog's Avatar
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    Feb 2010
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    Alot of good consul on this sight.
    The best I can say is get good at summer camping (grade school)

    Get good at late spring early fall ( high school)

    Get good at early spring, late fall ( collage )

    Now winter !!! ( gradute school)

    In the deep cold every thing is harder and the margin of error smaller.
    So all the skills you have before you do winter will make it so much more injoyable.
    The deep cold is a unforgiving teacher.
    It also lets you know what you do know and what you think you know very quickly!

    "fourdog"

    www.fourdog.com

  4. #14
    Senior Member
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    Jul 2010
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    I'm still new at winter Hanging and eager to learn more. Here is what I've discovered so far:

    Fingers get cold fast and don't work well in freezing temps. Keep em covered as much as possible. The less fiddling you do with knots and line the better. Rig your setup accordingly. Straps and buckles work better and are easier to manipulate with gloves on. I wear wristies and wool mittens that pull back to transform into fingerless gloves.

    Cold feet are hard to warm up. Get good boots that will keep your feet warm when you are hanging out at camp. It's easy to keep warm when moving but standing around and the feet go cold. I use Baffin boots and bread bags as a vapor barrier. My feet are happy. Down booties are a nice luxury.

    The first few times camp close enough to your car so if it goes wrong you can have a fall back plan. Always have a fall back plan.

    Beware the winter snow scape. What looks snow covered and beautiful may actually be a covering of snow on top of a deep hole or creek. One false step and you fall in (don't ask how I know this)

    Get a big tarp with doors. Use a CRL for ease of setup and adjustment. One that you can pull down close to the ground to block wind and blowing snow. If it is snowing be sure to knock the snow build up off your tarp so it doesn't get overloaded.

    BrIng a ccf pad even if you don't plan on using it. It can add warmth if you misjudged the temp. Use it as a sit pad. Worse case you could sleep on the snow in a cave or ditch if things got bad

    Bring a shovel. Lots of use too many to mention.

    Buy a hammock sock. One of the greatest inventions for winter hammocking IMO

    Bring a camp towel. You know one of those microfiber kinds. Good to dry you off if you get wet by falling into wet holes or to rid your hammock of unwanted condensation or snow that gets in your hammock and melts.

    Get a decent pair of snow shoes. Use poles that have a flip lock adjustment. The twist kind can freeze up and fail to adjust.

    Buy/build a pulk. Backpacking in snow is work.

    Get in shape. Everything is harder in winter.


    That's it for now. If I think of some more I'll add to my list.

    S
    Last edited by Sidewinder; 08-02-2012 at 21:06.

  5. #15

    Winter Camping Symposium

    Mors Kochanaski, Four Dog, and MacEntrye will being giving presentations at the MN Winter Camping Symposium at Camp Miller, just south of Duluth, the last weekend of Oct. The Gingers, Beep, Kiba, and most of the MN FBH hang alumni should be there. Stairguy is waiting to hear from TZ Brown. It is well worth the trip to hammock for two or three days with the legends of HF.

  6. #16
    WV's Avatar
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    Each year Doctari's posts about the Mt. Rogers hangs in January have a wealth of information and good advice. It's a good idea to come to a winter hang such as Mt. Rogers or one of the MN hangs. Some year I'm going to go to MN so I can learn from Mors and Fourdog, but in the meantime Mt. Rogers is closer for me. A group hang is a good idea because people look out for each other.

  7. #17
    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
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    Pulk.........I often use one in winter.
    Clothing management is a true skill as you don't want to get sweaty when hiking. It is a learned (the hard way) skill.
    A bit at a time. Go close and easy at first in winter.
    Shug







    Whoooo Buddy)))) I Love Onions, Grits, Greens, Livermush, NC Style BBQ, Potted Meat, Anchovies, 'Naner Puddin", Peanut Butter Pie, Red Velvet Cake and Cocoa and Straaaaaawwwwberrrry Milk and Coffee Crisps....
    I Hope Heaven has a Bakery!!!!



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  8. #18
    mountainhanger's Avatar
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    WOW What a response ! Thanks everyone, i appreciate the help, i am just really looking forward to some winter backpacking and hanging, just trying to get an idea of how too...and for the winter symposium i am definetly gonna try to make that one! More will be revealed as they say!!!!
    Grateful
    Tim
    It's not the boulders that throw us off balance, it's the pebbles beneath our feet

  9. #19
    fallkniven's Avatar
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    Your toes and hands will have the most difficult time keeping warm ecspecially when you stop moving. Instead of building a tolerance to the cold, over the years as your hands get exposed to more and more cold, your hands will get colder easier and faster as the years go on. I always have a pair of wool fingerless gloves, wool glove liners, and my lamilite mittens. I've tried the beefiest gloves I could get my hands on but they never work, mittens are needed for the real cold.
    Best way to really learn is to get out in it. It takes years to really know what your doing year round in the bush.

  10. #20
    Senior Member XSrcing's Avatar
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    Move to Bellingham. We have year round winter camping up on Mt. Baker! Ever want to wake up surrounded by snow and later that day doze off at the beach with your toes in the sand?

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