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  1. #1
    Senior Member engine386's Avatar
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    What would you do?

    About to order my HG 4S tarp and was going to order the standard 10'10" ridgeline, but was wondering if I should get the 12' instead....Do I really need the extra space? (I have an 11' bias WWM) Wont it make it harder to find a spot to hang if the tarp is bigger? -Eric

  2. #2
    dejoha's Avatar
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    Bigger tarps = wider hangs.

    A 12' ridge line for a tarp isn't bad, though, it just means that the minimum distance would probably be between 13 and 14 feet, to give you clearance to tie off knots, hardware, suspension, etc.

    I think you're still in the sweet spot. Having the extra coverage will give you more options. If you are trying to cut weight or something, than getting a smaller tarp is probably advisable.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Resqsarge03's Avatar
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    Jul 2012
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    I've been thinking about this too as I am about to do a DIY cat cut tarp. I've chosen 12 ft for mine in order to cover my DIY gathered end hammock. The hammock takes up just over 10 ft or so and the suspension connections/bags add just a little. I figure a little more protection over those ends won't hurt anything. Then again, I am really green at this sort of thing and could be completely full of it. :-) Just my .02.
    I am looking forward to getting some educated opinions from the folks at the Hot Springs NC hang in September on this issue while I paw at their gear. Muah ha ha ha

  4. #4
    2ply's Avatar
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    I've been using an 8X10 for several years. It gives just enough coverage for my hammock and gear but in a blowing rain the end areas can get moist. I switched to a 12X12 this Summer and really like the extra coverage it offers. I've had it out in several heavy storms and was glad I had the extra coverage as everything stayed dry.

  5. #5
    Senior Member engine386's Avatar
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    well I'm kinda of leaning towards the smaller ridgeline b/c it should still give me 100 percent protection, since it has doors... yes weight is important to me, I was just debating if the .5 ounce was worth the extra space. not sure what I need the extra space for, but its there if I need it lol

  6. #6
    jbrianb's Avatar
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    engine386:

    I have two preferred "cheap" tarps. One is 14" on the ridgeline (yes, it's massive) and it makes a great all-weather tarp.

    My other favorite is a Kelty coated polyester tent footprint for a Kelty Trail Dome 6 that I bought for $20. Weighs roughly 20 oz. including mesh bag. The TD6 has a 114x114 floor, but the footprint is inset... about three inches all around making it approx. 108"x108". Well, with my BIAS hammock, I use a 108" ridgeline... you see the mathematical dilemma...

    Turned on the diagonal, however, the formula for coverage is >>>>> square root of ((W((squared)) + (L(squared)). In other words, for my 9 foot by 9 foot tent footprint, the diagonal is the square root of 81+81 = 162 (square root of that)... Just under 13 feet.

    Concerns about the ends of the hammock on a diagonal tarp are well founded, but with almost two extra feet of coverage on each end, it's pretty substantial. In a storm with blowing rain, I'd expect to get a little damp toward the ends, making this my tarp for this time of year. Rain isn't cold and stuff dries out fast.

    Both tarps mentioned, by the way, cost less than $40. The Kelty has four tie outs -- one at each corner -- nothing more, but I find it sufficient.

    http://www.altrec.com/kelty/trail-do...FYOc7QodUTYAZw

    The larger tarp comes with poles... they weigh a lot... I used mine to stake pepper plants... without poles/stakes, but with guy lines and cords, it comes to about 25 oz. Lots of coverage for cheap but there is a weight penalty for all that coverage...

    http://www.bargainoutfitters.com/net....aspx?a=498634
    Last edited by jbrianb; 08-22-2012 at 08:11.
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