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  1. #1
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    new to hammocks need help!!!`

    Hello everyone,

    Just bought a hennessy ultralight backpacker hammock. I am a serious archery hunter and this is the only reason i bought this hammock. My question is if i sleep in my down sleeping bag in my hammock will i need more insulation underneath? The temps in september get down to about freezing and space and weight is a big concern for me so any options would be appreciated!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Kattelyn's Avatar
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    Yes. Because you're compressing your down sleeping bag under you.

    The reason down is so warm is because its fluffy. You will need to do something for underneath... maybe a pad or an underquilt. For freezing weather I would go with an underquilt suspended beneath your hammock for maximum warmth.

  3. #3
    Bubba's Avatar
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    As mentioned, you will need under insulation. If space and weight are an issue, a down underquilt is your best bet since it packs smaller than a synthetic quilt or foam pad. If you have the financial means, getting a down top quilt will also save some space and weight since it's smaller than using your sleeping bag as a top quilt.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  4. #4
    Fish<><'s Avatar
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    +1 to what bubba said.

    Here's my .02:

    A few of the companies out there I can think of for underquilts are kickassquilts (only company making synthetic), leighlo, jacksrbetter, eno, and I believe grand trunk now makes one. There are others, but if you purchase an underquilt, be prepared to spend around $200 regardless.

    Another possible option is a widely used one; it's called a poncho liner underquilt, and its made from a military issue poncho insulating liner, found for around $40 brand new (cheaper if used). All you need after that is some shock cord and in about 20 minutes you will have an underquilt good to around 45*. There are instructions for two different types of this idea. I have used mine down a lot lower (about what you are aiming at around freezing) but, it had help. I also used an overcover (fleece blanket over the ridgline (car camping is great sometimes) and a space blanket underneath me inside my hammock, but it worked well and all fit in my pack (minus the fleece blanket).

    You can also transform a sleeping bag into either a peapod or an underquilt. a pea pod is less difficult from my understanding, but turning an old bag into an underquilt is a commonly spoken topic here on the forums.

    Something that is a little less common is a hammock sock. This is similar to an overcover, like me using a fleece blanket, but it surrounds the hammock like an ENO bugnet. They are generally a lightweight nylon, and can have a surprising effect in temp differences. There are some socks out there that can increase ambient temp inside the sock by around 15*f, which is remarkable. Brings your freezing temps up to a tolerable level (unless you are Shug).

    Whatever you decide, you will eventually dial in your sleep system and you will have what works best for you. I hope I have been somewhat helpful. good luck and a warm, humid welcome from Guam!
    "We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it."- G. W. Sears

    My forum name is Fish<><; I'm in the navy; and I hate sleeping on the ground. If I didn't need ground to walk on or measure resistance to, I think I could happily give it up.

  5. #5
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    thanks for the info guys. so would just a space blanket on the bottom of the hammock and my down sleeping bag work?

  6. #6
    WV's Avatar
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    No, just a space blanket wouldn't be enough.

  7. #7
    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
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    I offer this........
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  8. #8
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    I find the CCF style Windshield Reflector is warmer than a SB (Space Blanket). Less noisy too. Reflectix is next best, still better than SB. My ThermaRest RidgeRest CCF slides a whole lot less than the blue WallyWorld CCF. DIYing doubled up Reflectix cozies for a pair of qt Nalgs and filling them with boiling water at bedtime really helps keep me warm also. They are still warm in the morning. Changing into fresh clothes at bedtime is a good idea.

    Sleeping bags in hammocks do need a lil more insulation underneath than in a tent. I've been down to -17F in a tent and 18F in a hammock. Just started hangin last summer and last winter was super mild. Never used an UQ (yet!), just the things mentioned above.
    ( insert pithy quote here )

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by widowmakr View Post
    Hello everyone,

    Just bought a hennessy ultralight backpacker hammock. I am a serious archery hunter and this is the only reason i bought this hammock. My question is if i sleep in my down sleeping bag in my hammock will i need more insulation underneath? The temps in september get down to about freezing and space and weight is a big concern for me so any options would be appreciated!
    I too am an archery hunter and I was in the same boat as you just 3 days ago when I joined this site. I've never even been in a hammock until today when I made one out of ripstop from Joanne fabrics. I've done a good bit of research and this is what I've found.

    You could always make your own underquilt out of a poncho liner obtained from Ebay. No sew methodponcho liner underquilt or search and there is also a "sew" method too.


    You could always modify/ make a Sleeping bag underquilt.
    Or another sleeping bag modification
    and another.

    Even a walmart cheapy sleeping bag would work.

    My local seamstress is going to modify my back up bag for just $25.

  10. #10
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    If you already have a down bag, consider modifying it to use as an Underquilt and another as a TQ. If you have any down blakets or comforters, you can use them as well. A UQ can be as simple as running a channel down both sides and another at the ends, cinched up with some shock cord. A mummy bag works well as a top quilt without modification, you just leave it unzipped and pull it over you like a blanket with your feet in the footbox. I've done both with a couple of North Face synthetic bags. A good seamstress can do for you at a fair price if you don't have the equipment or skills, or know someone who does. I guarantee once you sleep in your hammock in the warm embrace of a down underquilt you will consider every dime well spent, and you won't miss the sleeping bag one little bit.

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