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  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    palm beach, fl
    Hammock
    BB 1.7DL w/dutch
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    SUPERFLY
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    DUTCH & WHOOPIES
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    52

    New to forum: Need some help

    Hey all,
    New to the forum and I am glad I found this forum as it is awesome.
    I am in florida and need some help with how to set up for winter where the coldest will be about 30..

    I have a double layer Dangerbird coming and my son is swinging in a Explore Deluxe HH.

    My question is, what is the best set up for 60 to 30 degrees? The coldest we get down here..

    being a NOOB, I do not fully understand all the set ups. I see UQ set ups, pads, HH 4 season set up, etc....

    I am trying to go as light as possible but yet still stay warm.

    Please reply and let me know so I can get this all prepared..

    Thank you

  2. #2
    Member cwciwatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Hammock
    DIY Hennesy
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    Sml asym & LG Rect
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    Down
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    whoopie
    Posts
    67
    3/4 length down under quilt and large rectangular tarp is what I use in cold weather. A nice sleeping bag or top quilt is also necessary. Down is light, WARM, and compresses the best.
    "I wish I had a swing like that in my back yard"

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.1 dl
    Tarp
    WB Edge or SF
    Insulation
    HG Phoenix, DIY TQ
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    WB web or whoopies
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    280
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    11
    In addition to the hammock, you need a tarp for weather protection, bottom insulation (a foam pad or an underquilt), and top insulation (a top quilt or a sleeping bag). If you're handy with a sewing machine, you can make each of those items. If you're not or if you just aren't untested in making your own stuff, you should check out the cottage vendors here. Many of them sell some or all of the items you need. Here are a couple you cAn start with.
    http://warbonnetoutdoors.com/
    http://www.hammockgear.com/
    http://arrowheadequipment.webs.com/

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    palm beach, fl
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    Thank you cwciwatch..
    So UQ are the best?? then I see there are quite a few..
    I see there is down from Phoenix or the yeti, and then you have the arrowhead synthetics..
    should I go 3/4 or 2/3, or full length?
    Then there is a top cover... doesn't all this start to get real bulky??
    Now were talking about the tarp, hammock, UQ, and OQ..

    This is why I am getting real confused..
    Thanks

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    palm beach, fl
    Hammock
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    DUTCH & WHOOPIES
    Posts
    52
    I forgot to mention I have the superfly warbonnet tarp...
    AWESOME TARP!!! I will also buy another one of these for my sons HH..

    I am just confused on the rest..

    Thanks

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    London, KY
    Hammock
    DIY Ripstop/ Blackbird
    Tarp
    Tad Pole/Superfly
    Insulation
    Zeppelin/Rev X
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    whoopies
    Posts
    219
    I have a full length UQ and I will say that it's a bit bulky when packed, but I like not having to worry about my feet. If you use a 3/4 length (which is probably the most popular) then you will save some weight and size, but you will either need a small pad under your feet or some heavy duty socks or something. TQ's are nice, but you could use a sleeping bag if you already have that. Being in Florida, you probably won't need a big winter tarp, but it's nice for the extra protection. I just saw you have a superfly. That's what I have and it's nice and big, but if you wanted to save some space and weight, I'd recommend the tadpole from wilderness logics. It's their most popular tarp and I also have it. It's a very nice tarp when you're not worrying about using it like a tent to stay warm. I suppose your superfly could also come in handy for the torrential downpours in Florida though.

  7. #7
    sandykayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Hammock
    Switchback
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    BDD rect OESMacCat
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    JRB Shen /2 AHEsyn
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    Straps/Dutch Clips
    Posts
    645
    Hope to meet u at the 3rd FL Hang at Buck Lake in ONF in Jan. Possibly some other hangs before then. Go to the group hangs sub forum.

    Also, tx to HF member/s some FL SPs allow hanging. Still in process. There's a FL hangers Facebook page also.

  8. #8
    Mullach' Abu XTrekker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Hampton Roads, Virginia
    Hammock
    DIY - Canoe Hammock
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    DIY Hex Tarp
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    DIY TQ and UQ
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    DIY UCRs
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    Just watch all of Shugs videos. You will be a seasoned veteran after watching those videos. Or check out the stickies above. Slam-packed with all the info you need.

  9. #9
    Prefers life at 12 MPH. FLRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Gainesville, FL
    Hammock
    DIY Gathered End
    Tarp
    DIY Asym
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    DIY Modular Quilt
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    Whoopies/MSH
    Posts
    4,017
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    14
    As with all things outdoor-related, insulation associated with hammocking is very individualized. What you wind up finding "best" may not be "best" for someone else.

    Now, with that sheet anchor thrown to windward...

    Most folks find that an underquilt is the most comfortable way to sleep in cooler temps (the majority of folks need something underneath once it gets below the mid-to-low-70s).

    A pad can do this, too; however, unless you have a double-layer hammock, staying on top of a pad can be challenging. Also, a pad needs to be wider than the standard 20" WallyWorld blue CCF special for most folks; the hammock wraps further around your shoulders than the ground would, compressing more of your insulation (note that this is, in part, the secret of greater comfort with an hammock; your weight is distributed across a larger area than when you sleep on the ground, eliminating uncomfortable pressure points) and rendering it less effective. Since CCF doesn't compress, it needs to be wider than it would when you're sleeping on the ground (and the only portion of your body compressing the bag is your back). There are many ways to go about this, from purchasing a wider pad, to cutting a second pad and gluing it to the narrow pad in a "T" formation (to cover your shoulders and hips), to making an SPE (Speer Pad Extender; unfortunately, Speer no longer sells 'em, but ENO makes a clone that's made of heavier fabric).

    Back to underquilts...there are many fine cottage vendors out there making a plethora of underquilts. Before you start down this road, you need to decide what your budget is going to be. Underquilts are slightly heavier than pads in general, but they also pack down much smaller and are much more comfortable. However, because of that, they're more expensive as well; they require a lot more man-hours to make than a sheet of CCF.

    Do you use traditional packs or ultralight packs (or something in the middle)? If you use an ultralight pack (where a small sleeping/sit pad is the virtual frame for it), a 3/4 underquilt will be smaller and lighter than a full underquilt. You can get away with using that in the hammock, since you can take the pad out of your pack and place it (or even just throw the whole pack) under your legs and feet. I wouldn't recommend trying this with a traditional external frame pack, however; I'd think it'd wind up being rather uncomfortable.

    Now to top insulation...most folks find that a top quilt is the most comfortable and lightest for use in an hammock. The reasons for this are: 1.) it doesn't have any insulation underneath you to compress in the hammock, which is essentially dead weight; 2.) it's easier to get into and out of in an hammock than a full sleeping bag (that can be...interesting, if you want the bag zipped the whole way up; many folks use a bag as a quilt, with it unzipped partially); and 3.) if manufactured properly (the Jacks'R'Better guys are famous for this) it can be a puffy layer for around camp as well as a quilt.

    Here are some quilt vendors to give you an idea of what's out there:

    Jacks'R'Better
    Arrowhead Equipment
    Hammock Gear
    EnLIGHTened Equipment
    Underground Quilts
    LeighLo Quilts
    Tree to Tree Trail Gear
    Warbonnet Outdoors
    Wilderness Logics

    Note that these are in no particular order, and it's entirely likely that I missed a few vendors. Please, take a look at costs, weights, and temperature ratings before making a decision. Generally speaking, down quilts are going to be lighter and pack down smaller than synthetic quilts rated to the same temperature (also, they're going to be more expensive and slightly more water-sensitive).

    For Florida, 20 F (usually called "three season") should do you just fine, even here in the northern part of the state.

    Now, onto wind-blocking (you thought I was done, didn't you?)...

    All of this insulation is great, but if you don't block the wind, you're going to feel cold regardless. I'm assuming your son has the stock HH tarp? If so, it might be worth upgrading to the same Superfly that you're using in order to have a tarp that closes down and blocks the wind when needed. It's possible you could get by with an hammock sock (those are great for blocking wind) during the coldest months of the year down here in lieu of a tarp, since it doesn't tend to rain during those months. However, a tarp will give you the most bang for your buck, since it can be used year-round.

    Hope it helps!
    "Just prepare what you can and enjoy the rest."
    --Floridahanger

  10. #10
    MAD777's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    South Florida
    Hammock
    DIY, WBBB & Switchback
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    HG cuben,OES Spinn
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    DIY down 3/4 UQ/TQ
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    Dynaglide & Dutch
    Posts
    8,571
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    39
    Welcome!
    Don't worry about weight or bulk. Your hammock, bottom quilt, top quilt and tarp can easily be kept to under 4 pounds total for a 30 degree setup.

    That's comparable to most ground setups with tent, pad, and sleeping bag. Many folks carry tents heavier than that.

    I am weight conscious and use a 54" underquilt coupled with a CCF pad from foot to thigh. I carry a pad anyway, so it's not extra and weighs only a couple ounces.

    You and your son already have some nice gear to start from. It sounds like quilts are your next step. Think of a set of quilts as a sleeping bag cut in half, such that you have a top half and a bottom half (which is suspended under the hammock).

    You can use a conventional sleeping bag for the top quilt, but that is extra weight & bulk plus the inconvenience of extra material in the hammock with you.

    It's awfully hot in Florida now, but as soon as the humidity drops below 100% I string up my hammock on Saturday mornings by Lake Osborne in John Prince Park and sleep... I mean read a book! Shoot me a PM if you & your son want to meet up at the park and do hammock experiments
    Mike
    "Life is a Project!"

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