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  1. #1
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    1.9 ripstop doubled for strength

    I was reading on here about 1.9 ripstop doubled in a hammock for strength. I am using this method in my backpack hammock tent i designed we are still testing for strength of this. But it seems to be really strong. Any comments or experiences with this will be helpful. Thanks

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    Yeah I'm sure that will be super strong for a hammock. I'm pretty new to hammock sleeping but unless you are thru hiking and need the extra durability I personally feel it is way over kill. I sleep in a hammock made of a single layer of 1.1. I'm 200lbs and have about 20 nights in it with no problems. It does stretch a bit compared to heavier fabrics but I find that to be comfortable too. More than you ask for but I thought I'd throw it in anyway. Good luck!

  3. #3
    old4hats's Avatar
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    Just from what most of the hammocks mentioned on here are made of, yours is certainly strong. Perhaps way strong. With correct suspension you should have no fear of failure.

  4. #4
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    Among popular hammocks, but recommended for the very heavy, is the Warbonnet 1.7 double layer. That really is a double layer of 1.7, not so different in weight from your 1.9 ripstop. Read who that hammock is for at the Warbonnet site under "Hammocks 101."

    Some other makers also offer double layer hammocks, including DD, Claytor, BIAS, and JRB. They can tell you the weight of each layer.

    When Tree to Tree Trail Gear furnishes a double layer, the inner layer is a liner, of different fabric.

  5. #5
    jbrianb's Avatar
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    We recommend them for anyone over 400 lbs.

    Weight for one of ours (132" x 58") is about 24 ounces. A single layer 1.9 hammock is approximately half that, as you'd expect. The only weight not duplicated is the weight of the bag (though a larger bag is required), the bag cord and the cordlock which combine for less than an ounce.

    Two layers of 1.9 makes very robust gear but it comes with a significant weight penalty.
    Last edited by jbrianb; 09-06-2012 at 15:37.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Pipsissewa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamera1962 View Post
    I was reading on here about 1.9 ripstop doubled in a hammock for strength. I am using this method in my backpack hammock tent i designed we are still testing for strength of this. But it seems to be really strong. Any comments or experiences with this will be helpful. Thanks
    I'm on pins and needles waiting to see what a "backpack hammock tent" looks like. It seems most folks missed that detail in your original post. Please keep us apprised on how your new design is going! (I'm not much help!)
    "Pips"
    Mountains have a dreamy way
    Of folding up a noisy day
    In quiet covers, cool and gray.

    ---Leigh Buckner Hanes

    Surely, God could have made a better way to sleep.

    Surely, God never did.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Grinder's Avatar
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    The conventional wisdom, when I was sewing hammocks a few years ago, was that 1.9 was adequate for strength in single layer, but that 1.1 should probably be doubled.

    Therefore, your doubled 1.9 is like the safety engineer with belt and suspenders (just to be sure Ya know??) For backpacking, weight reduction is usually the prime consideration.

    But a double ply also allows more comfortable use of a pad under you and may be justified for that reason. I have one of those.

    Then, you have weight weeneys, like Sgt Rock who carefully trim length and width to bare minimums. Tepee Walters told me his rig broke one night. These things do happen, but , usually, no small children are harmed, so what the heck??

    Remember, as a DIYer, this is not your last project.
    grinder

  8. #8
    Member beasty-beast's Avatar
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    +1 on what grinder said, if you don't like it it's diy just redo it. but if it helps, i am a 6'1" 220lbs and my single layer 1.9 after much use doesn't really show any wear.

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