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  1. #11
    Senior Member Mustardman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Hammock
    Warbonnet Blackbird/Ridgerunner
    Tarp
    OES 12x10
    Insulation
    WB Yeti/Lynx
    Posts
    2,302
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    42
    My first two tarps were a Warbonnet Big MambaJamba, right when the Blackbird was first released, and a Speer 8x10.

    The two were like night and day. The BMJ was easier to get a tight pitch with, provided better coverage, and really didn't add much weight or bulk.

    From there, I upgraded to an absurdly beefy OES 12x10 that I deigned to mimic the 11x10 Speer Winter tarp, with extra tieouts in the middle of the cat cuts for "emergency" situations where more flexibility in pitching options would be useful, and I've used those extra tieouts extensively. Not long after that, MrsMustardman sewed her Asymmetrical Winter Tarp, which I was hoping would become a more popular design, but never really took off. Still, for a hammock with a clearly preferred entry direction, like the Blackbird, I think this tarp is one of the best we own for maximal winter coverage and weather resistance. You can pitch the narrower side into the wind to help reduce the sail effect, and still have plenty of room on the other side of the hammock, especially if you use a grip clip or panel pull to make some more space on that side.

    I've settled on the 12x10 size as my preferred tarp size - the 10 foot direction is good if you need to rotate the tarp if your trees are close together or whatever, and the 12 foot gives you the extra ridgeline coverage to keep your stuff dry even in "porch mode" with moderate wind. It's also a size that works quite well for two hammocks under one tarp, which is my preferred way to hang.


    That said, I might have something even more ridiculous coming soon, car-camping only, but it will be a lot of fun....

  2. #12
    miyanc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    monroe, nc
    Hammock
    BIAS Camper
    Tarp
    hh hex
    Insulation
    ugq zepplin uq
    Suspension
    whoopie/straps/msh
    Posts
    1,350
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    27
    I am very new at this and in my research I see a great many tarps set up and I can see what looks like 3-5 feet between it and the hammock. As I have not yet gone out as a backpacker with my hammock( last component will be arriving today) I spend most of my free time looking at what everyone else does. I will then apply that to my own set of skill( none ), but I have asked myself and some of you guys the same questions. If I buy a tent I usually feel confident in its ability to keep me comfortable. But a hammock takes some effort from the user to make sure its right. Including selecting right components to fit not only the parts your using but also the environment.

    I always try and plan for the worst and expect it to find me. Maybe those pictures are of people luckier than me. I would assume ( see told you I have no skills ) that the tarp needed to be at least long enough to cover the lenth of the hammock ( and then a little) and at least wide enough to cover the sides of the hammock. Then if you wanted to add extra if you were planning to use it as a base camp for cooking and lounging maybe doors and such. I would also think it should be as close to the hammock as possible to prevent snafu's.

    I will of course be learning as I go and again would like to thank all those on this forum that go out of there way to help. Good topic.
    A special thanks to Dream Hammocks, Dutchware. BIAS and Hammockforums.net for donating to our Secret Santa.

    Uwharrie hang in March https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/...ad.php?t=83029

  3. #13
    Acer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Southern Indiana Wooded Hills
    Hammock
    WBRR, BMBH UL, Diy M90 MR Gathered
    Tarp
    HG Cuben 4/Tadpole
    Insulation
    Lynx/UGQ/TeWa
    Suspension
    Straps/Dutch Bling
    Posts
    3,806
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    14
    I also think with the usage of new materials on the TQ's and UQ's and the types of hammocks being made..people are looking moreso to protect their investments alot more. Hence,,the larger tarps too.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Mustardman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Hammock
    Warbonnet Blackbird/Ridgerunner
    Tarp
    OES 12x10
    Insulation
    WB Yeti/Lynx
    Posts
    2,302
    Images
    42
    Just for fun, all of my tarps....

    Warbonnet BMJ on the left, Speer 8x10 on the right


    Asym 12x10 winter tarp


    OES 12x10 with two hammocks under it
    Last edited by Mustardman; 09-06-2012 at 13:00.

  5. #15
    dakotaross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Chamblee, GA
    Hammock
    DL Streamliner
    Tarp
    Toxaway w/doors
    Insulation
    JRB and/or HG
    Suspension
    webbing/buckle
    Posts
    936
    Images
    8

    ease of use

    Quote Originally Posted by miyanc View Post
    I am very new at this and in my research...
    If I buy a tent I usually feel confident in its ability to keep me comfortable. But a hammock takes some effort from the user to make sure its right. Including selecting right components to fit not only the parts your using but also the environment...
    I'd imagine anyone coming in to these forums at this point is overwhelmed by the variables presented. And being overwhelmed by it all leads to lack of confidence. Choices have exploded in recent years, but I can remember a time when the basic decision was whether to get a Hennessy or a Speer hammock, with minor options for each. And whether to use a pad with a SPE, or get a peapod or JRB nest. And today, decisions can still be that simple.

    Much of the discussion going on now is minutia, and by saying that I in no way want to diminish the value of those discussions. However, I can see how these discussions would leave you to believe that you HAVE to know details about what type of ridgeline, what type of suspension, what tarp, what UQ, and, of course, what Dutchware, etc. is right for you. Knowledge about all of these things is valuable, but not essential.

    Sleeping in a hammock is not more complicated, but certainly you can make it so. I've found that using a hammock can mean that you don't immediately realize how good you're sleeping - until you wake up and walk. Whereas in a tent, you can be well aware of how comfy you are on your pad and snuggled up in your bag, and then get up to walk and realize the overall experience really wasn't all that comfortable. Perhaps not so until you'll slept in a hammock.

    You can get a Hennessy with the standard diamond tarp and use your tent pad and bag and you'll be just fine. That is, of course, until you realize that there are all these details that make you more comfortable going to sleep. Some of these things will improve your sleep, but many are improvements of convenience and simply enhance the overall experience of getting out.

    I've been out in a storm with the classic Hennessy setup and didn't get wet. That said, I've moved on to different hammocks not because I'm so unpleased with the Hennessy, but that I'm looking to enhance my outdoor experience - not only better sleep, but weight savings, more dry space around the hammock, easier setup and breakdown, etc.

    My point is... don't let the minutia psych you out. Hammocking has gone very modular, but its still not all that complicated. Focus on the larger issues of technically how a tent keeps you sheltered and comfortable in comparison with how a hammock does the same. Once you get it at a basic level, you'll get how easy it is. And maybe you'll come up with some minutia of your own for discussion here!

  6. #16
    Doctari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Hammock
    WBBB
    Tarp
    Custom OES
    Insulation
    DIM UQ NoSniv TQ
    Suspension
    JRB Triglide/strap
    Posts
    2,992
    Images
    30
    I hate being,,,,, fashionable, so my tarp is 13.5' X 10'

    One night during a T-Storm spent under a "postage stamp" wondering how soaked I was going to get moved me under a much larger tarp. Then I got a deal on my "Baby", Yea, I aint getting wet unless, like Forest G said: The rain even came out of the ground! It weighs a Whopping TWO Pounds, but I figure if all my gear got wet, or even damp, the extra weight would be more than that, so,,,,,
    When you have a backpack on, no matter where you are, you’re home.
    PAIN is INEVITABLE. MISERY is OPTIONAL.

  7. #17
    Senior Member bkautzman89's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    washington
    Hammock
    WLLO
    Tarp
    WL Tadpole
    Insulation
    AHE NR UQ
    Suspension
    whoopies
    Posts
    205
    it's been a pretty big change for me over the last couple years. when i started a few years ago, i just had a poly from walmart. i had no idea what i was doing, just hung up some rope, draped the tarp over it, and called it good.
    but then i found this site, and i was overwhelmed with options. i spent a good few months trying to figure out what tarp i wanted. i had no idea there were such materials as cuben or silnylon. i didn't know about asym or hex. and i really had no idea that you could get good coverage out of a 11'X7'6" tarp, and yet have it weigh next to nothing, and still pack down to a small size(talking about the tadpole which i now have)
    i try not to get caught up in what is cool and popular, i was raised to just do my own thing. but i've noticed that smaller isn't always better, and now i see why people use bigger tarps. the tiny amount of extra weight is worth it, just so you don't have to bring extra things like doors.

  8. #18
    Senior Member J.Andersons's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Riga, Latvia
    Hammock
    TTTM single
    Tarp
    MacCat Ultra
    Insulation
    sleeping bag
    Suspension
    rope and straps
    Posts
    470
    Decided myself to go with bigger tarp, my preference are more comfort than saving couple of hundreds grams.
    Decision had not been easy but not regretting it. Cuben could be nice but this are out of my price range at time and took plunge for silnylon MacCat Ultra one.
    Ride fast
    Live fun

  9. #19
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Hammock
    Warbonnet ON!
    Tarp
    SuperFly or MacCat
    Insulation
    Yetis & Mambas
    Suspension
    Webbing and rings
    Posts
    13,919
    Images
    136
    I have really enjoyed my tarp evolution!

    I started with the "postage stamp" sized tarps (I call them napkins ). This was because my first 'camper' was a Hennessy and that's the tarp that came with it. I used it happily. I have to say, I can't really think of a better way to develop your tarping skills than using a teeny tiny tarp while hiking and sleeping through Florida rainstorms. Learn I did!

    Prepping for my AT hike, I knew I would need something to shield me from the cold wind and rain I'd find for the first couple of months. Timing being everything, Warbonnet had a new winter tarp design that needed some testing; the Superfly. I jumped at the opportunity and quickly became enamored with a large tarp. Other hikers would make comments constantly like "You've got your own studio apartment". It felt massive by comparison to my previous tarp/hammock experiences.

    But, along came spring, then summer. The extra weight of all that sil was interfering with my cookie addiction. Guess what? Once again the fates smiled on me and timing was again on my side. OES was starting to work with Spinn and Brian got in touch with me about carrying one on my journey northward. When he told me it would only weigh around 7oz, my 20+ ounce Superfly may as well of been a bag of bricks. Remember, I need cookie space!

    So, for the rest of my hike, I carried that dreamy MacCat Standard made of Spinn. Glory be! It was just marvelous. Plus, as an added bonus, the same old discussion (argument) about whose gear is better bloomed back into existence as all the 'experienced' LDH types told me that Spinn is a worthless materiel and I'd be sorry that I was carrying it. Well,

    When I came off the Trail and came back to Colorado, it was the end of summer. Nighttime temps up in the mountains can be pretty cool even in the summer, but the wind can be ridiculous. Back to the large tarps!

    This is about the time the tarp side of my hammock addiction started to kick-in. I started buying/trying/building tarps. I was looking for what I'm always looking for in life: balance. In the end, I have mostly settled on a mid-sized tarp (think, MacCat Deluxe/WB Edge range) for my goto rigs. I still employ a mindset of using the right tool for the job with my tarps. If I'm doing serious miles in fair weather, I'm quick to break out the Micro. Miles, long or short, in winter has the Superflies coming back out. But, for a run of the mill trip, I'll stick with my Goldilocks sized tarps.

    The small tarps provide such nice views without having to build a hiking pole porch; which suck when it starts to rain in the middle of the night!
    The large tarps provide safe haven when Mama Nature gets all cranky and stuff.
    The mids give a nice bit of both; generalists in a drawer full of specialists.

    It is the last category that I have spent my cuben money upon. If I'm paying that much per square inch of fabric, then I want it to be 'just right'.
    Trust nobody!

  10. #20
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Like Lewis & Clark: Wintrin' o/t Columbia again: PDX
    Hammock
    Clark w 2QZQ mod,Tropical, NX;Nano
    Tarp
    Clark micro
    Insulation
    Major down
    Suspension
    7/64 SK75 +strap
    Posts
    2,325
    Images
    13
    Go to Clark's junglehammock.com web page and see some of the sewn-3 dimensional tarps that Clark used to furnish. They just have not updated the web page. Six, not two pieces of sewn fabric. The ridge line comes down above your sightless feet and then rise back up again to allow the hammock suspension at the foot end.

    I find this 8 ft long tarp, maybe just 3' wide at tail, 7' at head, large enough to cover Clark's largest hammock. (wt<9pz)

    No grand porch mode with that. I'm also not tall, so the limited width is not a penalty. The need for wider tarps for bigger guys -- and I assume that many of the many heavyweights here have height to match -- is seldom mentioned. But, geometry dictates adding 3 feet of width to what I need if you are 6'6", want the head room I have, and pitch the tarp @ 45 degrees.

    Paul's AHE Shangri- La tarp retains the head to foot asymmetry that also characterized Clark's recent largest tarp, recently abandoned, presumably for preference of their buyers for maximum coverage. I believe the AHE shape is an old design, also found in the plan of a cuben tarp that has shown up at Lawson's.

    I mention Clark from familiarity, and because, with Hennessy, it has been in the hammock and tarp / rain-fly business for some years.
    Last edited by DemostiX; 09-09-2012 at 15:06.

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