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  1. #1
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    Emploring your experience...

    Hello,

    I'm currently considering getting a hammock for hiking and travel and was wanting to ask a bit of advice.

    I live in Scotland, it is often wet but more of an issue when in a hammock- it is cold and windy. I was wondering if anyone could recommend hammock models and manufacturers that they think would be best for these conditions- hammocks that are most protective (in terms of from the elements as opposed to from the bugs, though thats also a handy thing) and there is a slight issue of affordability. I'm looking no more than £100 really... don't know what that is in dollars with conversion rates.

    So any hardened cold weather campers got any recommendations that would be fab. Thanks!

    Becky

  2. #2
    Senior Member Roadtorque's Avatar
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    One of the less experienced here but I would recommend the clark NA with the weather shield it seems it would be a big plus for you. Not really sure your dollar vs ours but that might be slightly on the high side but do keep in mind thats a complete package. My second choice would be a claytor jungle hammock this is probably right in your price range with maybe a bit left over for a pad for the pad pocket. A lot of people on this site like one of those with good arguments on both sides. I dont think a guy/gal could go wrong with either. If you have not already also search around this site for cold weather hanging. Good luck and welcome to the fourm this is a great place to learn with lots of friendly people to answer your questions.

  3. #3
    i don't know what that converts to either, but it's gonna be hard to get a hammock (especially with a net) and a big tarp (which you will need to combat windy conditions) for less than 150$USD. you could make a setup like this for that price though. i guess you need to figure how much that is in usd first.

    you could probably get an eno on sale for 40$ and you could probably get a large yet cheap sil tarp from campmor.com for 70-80$. neither of these have any special features, but the eno is decent and the campmor tarp is at least sil. if you want higher performance gear you will most likely have to spend more$$.

  4. #4
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    Yeah, £100 (GB pounds) currently converts to $160... ****, the clark NA looks brilliant, and I have a friend who has one, who has recommended it.

    Maybe need to save some more Had a look at Eno. They seemed a bit of a novelty thing instead of being used for camping- didn't seem to have any special features to protect. Does anyone have one?... and has been in cold conditions with them?

    Thanks for your advice! Really helps when scanning through sites. Never would have expected the claytor jungle being recommended- the site isn't particularly brilliant at getting across the quality of its products and didn't pay it much heed on first looks... but am going to take a closer look now.

    Whats the Hennessey Asym like? Is it more a warm climate hammock?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Roadtorque's Avatar
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    I have an ENO double nest that is set up on a hammock stand in my computer room/guest room. I really is just a hammock about as plain as it gets but the more I use it the more I like it. It is very roomy and comfortable. The main reason I got it was to see if I liked hammocks prior to spending money on a clark NX200. I have not taken it camping yet but I would like to. The main problems I foresee with this hammock would be 1. with all the "extra"fabric your carrying some unnecessary weight but all in all it wouldn't amount to that much and 2. because this is a bare bones hammock a lot of extra gear would be required for cold use (underquilt, pad, sleeping bag, tarp, bugnet) which could easily add up to being more than one of the higher end hammocks. Take a look at the "hammock TV-adventures with Turk" thread. Turk is using a ENO single nest I believe. I cant remember which part (1,2,3) it is in but watch them all they are entertaining. But I do like the ENO and I think it is a good hammock to start with and in the long run can make a good back up hammock or one to just lounge around the yard when you dont feel like dealing with tarps and such.

    Despite the claytor being called a "jungle hammock" I have read on this forum by others that it does pretty well in the cold because it has a built in pocket to slide an inflatable/insulated pad into. It also has a bug net which you said you might like. I dont have one of these but others do and I'm sure they will chime in (hopefully they are out hanging this weekend!).

    As far as quality of the hammocks I cant speak for the claytors or clarks because I dont have them but you can read about them elsewhere on this forum. The ENO seems to be built very sturdy. I have no doubt that the double nest would support its claimed 400lbs. Between me and my wife in it we make about 340lbs and other than being a little cramped it holds fine. The stitching is holding well and all in all seems well made. I use mine on almost a daily basis mostly for watching tv and movies on the computer/ reading/ taking naps and it has held up fine for the 6 months I've had it. I slept in it nightly for about 2 weeks in that time as well. If you have any specific questions about the ENO I will try to answer those and let others speak for their types of hammocks.

    A small warning though. I didnt believe it when I read it on this forum when I was getting into hammocks but it is slightly addicting. if you have $160 be carefull because its only a matter of time before your "hung"! a lot of people here get into making their own hammocks and equipment. I dont have the time or know-how so I'm stuck in the paying full price group which can add up in a hurry. However it's a lot of fun to play around with hammocks. Well I'm rambling now.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    Rather than looking at a specific hammock, look at the whole hammock system. The Clark is more protective than the ENO, but if you get an ENO with a large tarp and a hammock sock, you're just as protected (more on bottom, actually) for much less money. And probably lighter. And much more versatile b/c you can leave the sock at home when it's warmer and not windy. That's just comparing those two models...there are many here that people enjoy. (Plenty of people here camp with ENO, by the way.)

    If you want protection from wind, look at the larger tarps like the JRB Hammock Hut or 10x11 tarp, the Speer Winter Tarp, and even the MacCat Deluxe for wind protection.

    Then for insulation, look at pads, underquilts and the PeaPod.

    Might check here for more ideas:
    http://www.tothewoods.net/HammockCampingCold.html
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  7. #7
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    Don't forget to factor in what is comfortable for you.

    Consider going with a more modular system. A hammock that is compatible with under quilts, pads and weather shields from different manufactures. This will allow you to purchase gear as you determine your needs and as your budget allows.

    Warbonnetguy's Blackbird is a real nice hammock. It will eat up your budget, but in terms of quality, interior space, flatness of lay, overall weight it's very nice. Survived in comfort last nights weather (+30knot winds on the Lake, +3C air temp, off and on mix of freezing rain) in the Blackbird, JRB uq + Weathershield2, MC Deluxe and +5C bag. Felt like I was sleeping in a wind tunnel at times. Should have setup much lower to the ground.
    Noel V.

  8. #8
    Doctari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by koaloha05 View Post
    Don't forget to factor in what is comfortable for you.

    Consider going with a more modular system. A hammock that is compatible with under quilts, pads and weather shields from different manufactures. This will allow you to purchase gear as you determine your needs and as your budget allows.

    Warbonnetguy's Blackbird is a real nice hammock. It will eat up your budget, but in terms of quality, interior space, flatness of lay, overall weight it's very nice. Survived in comfort last nights weather (+30knot winds on the Lake, +3C air temp, off and on mix of freezing rain) in the Blackbird, JRB uq + Weathershield2, MC Deluxe and +5C bag. Felt like I was sleeping in a wind tunnel at times. Should have setup much lower to the ground.
    I so second the consideration of know what is comfortable for you, especially re how cold you can stand. My hiking partner, a South Florida native, would nearly freeze to death in my set up at 70f, whereas it easily takes ME down to 15f

    For those windy conditions where you just can't tell which way the wind is going to blow, and yes it will set you back a few Pounds, http://www.jacksrbetter.com/index_fi...mock%20Hut.htm will totally enclose your hammock set up.
    OR: make / have made a hammock sock as talked about here: http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...t=hammock+sock
    I actually have this sock, it ROCKS!!!

    or get a (similar to a sock) above mentioned weathershield: http://www.jacksrbetter.com/index_fi...hield%20T2.htm

    I have yet to try it, but I hear that setting up closer to (nearly on?) the ground can help. I think this is also means rigging your tarp lower / flatter.

    And, if at all possible, chose your campsite VERY carefully: Take advantage of natural shelter, wind blocks, etc. Camping on the lee of the hill / mountan can greatly improve your living conditions.
    My favorite camp EVER was somewhere in northern NC I found a abandoned logging road on the lee (Blowing from the W) of the hill, the angle of the (w side) cut for the road exactly matched the cut of my MacCat type tarp, the 2 tarp walls protected me from the N & S, & very tall, very dense evergreens protected me from the E. I was totally warm & mostly dry, & the reason I was even slightly damp was because most of my clothing was wet from wearing it during the early part of the storm I fortunatly got set up just before the worse part of the storm hit, Wish my camera still had film This was a "Perfect set up" & I feel the location made all the difference that night, as not once did I feel even a slight breeze.
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