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  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Mobile, AL
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    2

    Noob looking for guidance

    Hey guys, just joined two days ago. I can't wait to be a hanger, but I can't seem to know which hammock to select to be my first. I've looked through the sticky on the different price setups, but I only became more overwhelmed.

    For starters, I would like a versatile hammock. One that I could potentially take hiking/backpacking yet one I'm comfortable just throwing up in my backyard and hanging out in. I see a lot of people have multiples, but I really don't have the funds to just buy everything. I've liked the looks of Kammok and ENO, but Treklight and BIAS look just as good. and I have no idea where to start with suspension. If anyone could give me a few pieces of advice to get me on my way to hanging, that would be great. Thanks guys!

  2. #2
    Bubba's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.7 SL
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    WB Superfly
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    WB and UGQ
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    Whoopies or Straps
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    If you want versatility it may be a good idea to get a hammock and a separate bugnet. The Warbonnet blackbird is a very popular hammock but it has an integrated bugnet. You could get a Warbonnet traveler and Warbonnet bugnet or a BIAS hammock and BIAS bugnet.

    The two popular suspension options are all webbing and cinch buckles or whoopie slings and webbing. With the all webbing suspension, the length is anywhere from 10 to 15 feet per side. With whoopie slings and webbing, six foot whoopie slings and six feet of webbing can cover most situations. Whoopies and webbing cuts down a little weight and bulk vs the webbing.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  3. #3
    New Member barnabus1898's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Natchitoches, LA
    Hammock
    DIY
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    DIY Hex Tarp
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    The cheapest/easiest thing I can think of doing is making a hammock out of a tablecloth from www.tableclothsfactory.com. I selected a 90 x 132 crinkled taffeta tablecloth.

    Link here: http://www.tableclothsfactory.com/Cr...vers-s/136.htm

    You can then buy whoopies from www.whoopieslings.com or you can make them. They're very inexpensive to make and take no time once you've had a little practice! I made 2 for the actual suspension and 1 as a structural ridge line. You can do this by purchasing 46 ft of amsteel rope from www.reddenmarine.com (I went with an even 50)

    The reason you need roughly 46 ft. of rope is that for every whoopie sling you make, you need twice as much rope (since it's basically going to make a giant loop)
    This means:
    2 6ft. Whoopies=12 ft of rope a piece=24ft
    1 11ft. Whoopie=22 ft of rope

    Here's the video I used to make whoopie slings: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5dgCy2qyIGY

    Instead of using tape (which can be very annoying) I picked up the largest eyed needle I could find in the sewing section of Wal-Mart and it worked just fine. Cost me less than 2 bucks.

    I bought a set of 2 ratchet straps from Wal-Mart that were 10 ft long and advertised holding around 3000 lbs. Cost me maybe 10 bucks. Way cheaper than using advertised hammock straps. I used a razor blade to cut away the paint on the S-hooks so I could pull the strap out. That way I had a 10 ft. strap with a loop already sewn at the end.
    I also bought an ENO Guardian Bugnet to go over everything and it works well.

    So to sum up everything with costs. I'm poor, so everything had to be pretty cheap. Here's what you can expect to pay for it all (give or take a few bucks)

    Taffeta tablecloth=$25
    46 ft of Amsteel=$12
    Big Eyed Needle=$2
    Polyester Straps=$10
    ENO Bugnet=$55

    Total Cost=$104

    That's pretty cheap for everything you'd ever need for having a fully functional system. The only thing left to do would be to get a tarp and winter gear if you were thinking about taking it in cooler/possibly rainy weather. I currently am using a cheapo tarp from Wal-Mart until I have money to spend on a lighter weight tarp. I'm also just laying a cheap sleeping bag in the hammock if the nights are cool. In Louisiana however, it hardly ever gets below freezing, so I may not invest much in an OQ or UQ (over quilt or under quilt). But this way you can get started on the cheap and then plan what you want to buy or try next. Hope this helps some.

  4. #4
    Member ReXwag's Avatar
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    Aug 2011
    Location
    Pleasant Grove, Ut
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    54
    you could go the a hammock kit from BIAS it will come with everything and you can customize what it will come with bugnet, suspension is whoopieslings you may not know what they are now but you will eventual end up at those for suspension most do. If you need a bugnet I have a hammock bliss no seeum bug net and willing to sell it for 35$ you just have to cover shipping it's never been used.

  5. #5
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Staten Island, NY
    Hammock
    Hennessy Expedition
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    Stock Asym
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    Biner & Rap Rings
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    3
    For my first setup I tried to keep it super cheap I used the equip travel hammock from Walmart cost about $25. For my suspension I used harbor freight cam buckle straps about $10. Guide gear tarp which was $25. For insulation I used a wool blanket from harbor freight $8 and an old sleeping bag as a TQ. Total cost was around $75. Used it for quite a few summer trips and slept great.

  6. #6
    Burning at both ends Dblcorona's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Novi, MI
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    WBBB 1.7 DBL
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    I think you'll end up with as many options as the set-up thread. I helped set-up my brother-in-law. He ended up with a Grand Trunk Skeeter Beater and I switched out the suspension to whoopie slings and tree straps. Pretty versatile for camping and lounging. For another friend, I made his hammock and he bought a mosquito net for it and this worked great too. So I guess my point is they will all work and if you find you like them, you'll end up with mor than one.
    "We don't stop hiking because we grow old,
    we grow old because we stop hiking."

    -- Finis Mitchell,

  7. #7
    MDSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Snyder, TX
    Hammock
    DIY 30d MARPAT
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    DIY .74 oz cuben
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    ISLS with UCRs
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    2,162
    I bought a Grand Trunk Ultralight because it was $20. I like it very much but then found this link and felt bad about buying from the slave state of China: http://www.hammockforums.net/article...cturerlist.htm.

    When looking at the spreadsheet be sure to scroll all the way down through it.

    Mike

  8. #8
    Member MadWolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Hammock
    ENO DN
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    WB Superfly
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    DIY Climashield UQ
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    Whoopies /straps
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    I have a ENO Double Nest and find it a great starter hammock. When REI has sales I believe you can pick them up under 50. Only thing I did was replace the factory caribiners with lighter ones but. I then bought the ENO bug net (kind of expensive at 55 bucks and I think there are better options out there, but easy) and used a harbor freight tarp (under 10) for my first extended stay in my hammock. If you want easy suspension ENO now has the ATLAS straps that are poly so they will not stretch like the slap straps. I personally purchased tree straps and whoopies for arrowhead equipment(marlin spike hitch whoopie kit for 22.50). I think it ends up being cheaper and gives you more versatility. Also will work later down the road if you decide to change hammocks and is something you can run through the channels of an ENO to replace the factory rope. This is not the cheapest set up but in the world of hammock camping is still in the lower tier cost wise.

    Also when figuring cost of getting into a hammock do not overlook your insulation. Even in Alabama you are going to need something if you start hammocking over the winter months.

    Be warned though, Hammock camping is addicting and can get costly when you start looking at all the accessories and mods and DIY projects and .........

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