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  1. #11
    Member
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    Sep 2011
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    Richmond Va
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    I'm 220lb and hang from the wall studs in my upstairs guest room. Have done so for at least 2 months on a nightly basis, and still head up there for napping on a weekly basis. No movement in the walls that I can tell. FWIW, I have my eyebolts only '1 or so below the ceiling, so they're pretty close to the wall header.

  2. #12
    olddog's Avatar
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    Jan 2011
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    Glad to hear that you're finally making it inside. Winters can get nasty up there in N. Georgia.
    Most of us end up poorer here but richer for being here. Olddog, Fulltime hammocker, 365 nights a year.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2010
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    Portland, OR
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    I have experienced bowing of a vertically loaded 4x4 (porch roof support) from hanging between it and a tree. After seeing that, I wouldn't hang from wall studs unless the weight load was distributed across several (or there was a sturdy pole between the studs as old4hats describes)

  4. #14
    Chammocks's Avatar
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    Mar 2012
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    My nephew pulled down a 2x6 on the outside corner of his house when he was hanging between the house and a tree. The 2x6 landed in his lap as he came crashing down, with all kinds of nails poking out, one of which ripped a gash in his head that took staples to close. Don't do it!

  5. #15
    Senior Member
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    Apr 2012
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    California
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannibal View Post
    I have no evidence, so we can just call it hearsay.

    My first hammock was hung between studs in a vertical wall. I slept that way for at least a month or two before I built a stand. Why did I build a stand? Because I started to feel things move and one day when I looked at the wall, I could see it bowing outward along the stud.

    Did I do any structural damage? Probably not.
    Would I have, given more time? In my opinion, yes.

    I was in the 230s at the time, so not exactly an average sized hanger. Personally, I don't trust the method. OTOH, I can't recall hearing any stories about studs failing either. Still, it's a gamble I'm not comfortable taking.

    old4hats-
    Welcome to the indoor madness.
    So far yours is the worst story I have head, but thanks for posting it up.

    I don't really think its a good idea... But for an idea that has been done SO many times and is so hard to find an example of it gone wrong... Its hard to say its a bad one.


    But for sure, if your wall begins to bow... its a bad one
    Glad you caught it when you did, and I appreciate the first hand experiance with troubles coming from the simple way.

  6. #16
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Central NC
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    13
    I have also considered setting up a hammock indoors. My hangw would be in a finished basement. Since it is not clear how the studded walls are attached to the 'shell' of the basement the studs in the wall are out. What I have considered is attaching a 2x6 to opposite sides of the room walls. Then using the chain link fence pipe across the two. The two by sixes would hold the downward compression of the hammock and the pipe would deal with the compression load. I can buy square tubing from a local steel supplier to make the ridge pole.

  7. #17

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    Jun 2011
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    Hatfield, MA
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    I don't understand why people choose to attach to walls when they could just use a stand. Stands can be inexpensive (I built my first one with a dollar's worth of sheet rock screws and wood from the scrap pile), they are fairly easy to build, they can be moved (I use mine in the bedroom and on the porch), and they don't put holes in your walls. You could also spend more money and build/buy a stand that looks like real furniture. (my current stand cost $70 in materials)

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