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  1. #1
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    Hammocking Inside

    I want to replace my bed. Do you have any tips hanging a hammock indoors? What type of stand is best? I don't want to use the studs in my apartment. What stand do you use?
    Last edited by funbun; 02-17-2007 at 13:00.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    I use the Vario hammock stand by Byer. It's a little over $100 depending on where you get it, not too bad on the eyes but not really fancy. There are a few pics of it on my website if you poke around...don't remember exactly where.
    “Republics are created by the virtue, public spirit, and intelligence of the citizens. They fall when the wise are banished from the public councils because they dare to be honest, and the profligate are rewarded because they flatter the people, in order to betray them.” ~Judge Joseph Story

    - My site: http://www.tothewoods.net/
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    IMPOSSIBLE JUST TAKES LONGER

  3. #3
    slowhike's Avatar
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    i can't give you much guidance on a nice indoor hammock stand (though i have made two rustic, out door types).
    i just wanted to say welcome to the "i'd rather sleep in my hammock than a bed" club!
    i been sleeping in one for a couple years now, but i own my own home (well... the bank may argue that) so i went right into the walls.
    ...tim
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  4. #4
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    I have the byer vario one like Jeff has and really like it. It was actually the only stand that I could find that would go small enough to fit in my bedroom. Now I have my hammock stand with hammock right next to my kind sized bed. Great room for sleeping.

    BTW, I just use some spectra with a loop tied in to attach it. It is a pain to use any form of webbing. You can use a larkshead to attach the hammock body. That way you can do a quick change if you need it for outdoors use.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  5. #5
    Jazilla's Avatar
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    I made a version of Risk stand for outside. I plan on making on for inside. Its cheap, simple and you can paint it to look pleasing to the eye.
    Yosemite Sam: Are you trying to make me look a fool?
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazilla View Post
    I made a version of Risk stand for outside. I plan on making on for inside. Its cheap, simple and you can paint it to look pleasing to the eye.
    I thought about Risk's stand also, but I wonder about the longterm usage. It seems like a temporary structure instead of a permanent structure to be used night after night. I wonder if you made it with 4x4 instead of 2x4 and made the bottom bean solid instead of collapsible if it would be stronger?

  7. #7
    BillyBob58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by funbun View Post
    I thought about Risk's stand also, but I wonder about the longterm usage. It seems like a temporary structure instead of a permanent structure to be used night after night. I wonder if you made it with 4x4 instead of 2x4 and made the bottom bean solid instead of collapsible if it would be stronger?
    I had used the Risk stand for a while. The trouble was I had to build it a little longer than his specs called for (I thought it was a little short for my Hennessee Hammack Explorer), so that gave me two joints in the overhead bar instead of one. The bar takes 90% ( maybe 100%) of the load. And mine always flexed little bit, although that might have been due to the greater length. Anyway, one of the joints finally collapsed and the bar bent badly. I did not hit the ground, amazingly enough. I just very rapidly dropped about 2 feet, got out and noticed the bar was now bent at a pretty good angle. None of the wood broke, although one of the 1/4" plywood braces that went to the bottom beam was very close to it.

    Bottom line, I decided to soup it up. I had always been a bit paranoid about the bottom beam, which I would land on if things gave way. Plus, when I would use it on my back porch which has a hard floor, the bottom beam prevented me from easily placing padding underneath me. So, first thing I did was to bulletproof the top bar. I went to Lowe's and bought a slightly larger diameter(1 5/8) chain-link fence post which I slipped over the original top rail (1 3/8), including the joints. If I had a broom handle handy, I think that would have worked just as well by simply slipping it into the top rail. Anyway, this completely prevents any flexion of the top rail and the joints are covered. It seems far more solid and secure.

    Then I got some 1/2" plywood instead of the original quarter inch, and two extra ultracheap 7.5 ft two by fours to make up a total length of 15 feet for the bottom beam. Now I have two 15 ft. bottom beams instead of one, each one moved out to the side instead of having one in the middle. Instead of 1/4" plywood triangle connecting the upright to the bottom 4 foot 2 by 4, I now have 1/2" plywood in a 2' x 4' rectangle that goes all the way across each end. The center upright is bolted to this as it was to the original plywood triangle. In addition, I have two more 4 foot uprights on each end and this plywood triangle is also attached to these uprights, and then these uprights on the end are bolted in the original fashion to the bottom beam with half-inch plywood triangles. And just for good measure, I had a couple of scrap 4 foot long two by fours left over, so I put one of those on each end on top of the half-inch plywood rectangle, attaching it to all three uprights only each end. Also, instead of connecting the 2 7.5 ft. center bottom beams ( for a total of 15 ft.) by making a plywood sandwich, I instead took some additional 2 x 4 plywood scrap and screwed that to the two bottom 7 1/2 foot bottom beams, joining them for a total of 15 feet. This is also now far more solid. I guess if you never wanted to break this down for transport to a campground, you could just use a 15 ft. 2 by 4. But I don't think it would be any more solid than it is in the way that I have done it.

    I hope the above lengthy description is not totally confusing, I should just send a picture. Bottom line is it's solid as a rock now. Very little sway when I shift around in the hammock. I wouldn't be at all surprised if the wood by itself would hold the load even without the fence post at the top. The original would have probably been plenty solid enough, and much lighter in weight. But after I lengthened the whole thing, resulting in two joints in the upper rail rather than one, it just wasn't strong enough to hold my 205 pounds. Although it probably still would have been plenty strong enough if I had simply added the larger diameter upper bar (or inserted a broomstick) to go over the two joints, limiting flexion. But like I said, I was never happy with that bottom beam underneath me, so I decided to just make a project of it and kind of redo the whole thing. It also gave me a good excuse to buy that new circular saw!

    It's super solid now, and now if I'm hanging over the solid back porch floor, I have no trouble putting what ever amount of padding I desire (for insurance) underneath me.

  8. #8
    Jazilla's Avatar
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    funbun, if you make the top bar solid and the botom bar also. Also make it only slightly larger than the hammock you are using. The short distance and solid peices should help it to last a while. Plus for the price you could make one a month for a year to equal the cost of a metal one.
    Yosemite Sam: Are you trying to make me look a fool?
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    . . .I hope the above lengthy description is not totally confusing, I should just send a picture. . .
    Please send a picture. Or post it here or something. I think I understand what you're talking about. Basically, you've got a rectangular base.

    I plan to buy big piece of 4130 steel tubing from Aircraft Spruce. It's the same type tubing that I use in my "stick" bike:

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by funbun View Post
    Please send a picture. Or post it here or something. I think I understand what you're talking about. Basically, you've got a rectangular base.

    I plan to buy big piece of 4130 steel tubing from Aircraft Spruce. It's the same type tubing that I use in my "stick" bike:
    My wife is visiting our daughter in NH until Wed and she took the only digital camera. But yes, just basically a rectangular end that 3 uprights and the 4 ft. wide base attach to, instead of the single plywood triangle attached to the 4 ft. base and 1 upright, as used in the original Risk. And instead of a single bottom beam connecting each 4ft. base in the center, 2 bottom beams each moved out to the sides, at the ends of the 4 ft base end piece. Leaving the center wide open to the ground.

    And probably most important, if you don't mind that center beam under you, is the strengthened fence top rail. Which it sounds like you have already addressed by using the 4130 tubing.

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