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  1. #11
    The Spaceweaseal Paradox spaceweaseal's Avatar
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    Put the tarp as low as posable and make sure your head or foot end is not facing into the wind. Set it up at home in storm mode, (low and tight) and sray the heck out of it with your water hose to check your setup.
    I know it sounds stupid but it will give you a idea of what works and what does not work.
    Happy hanging


    If I get a chance tomorrow I will set my Siam to get some pics for you of what I am talking about..

  2. #12
    Senior Member
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    There is rain and there is RAIN. I like to hang on the Oregon Coast. My problem for a long time was staying dry. The rain is not the soft type that just falls out of the sky. That is easy, just hang your rainfly low, if the rain is coming from one direction slant your rainfly a little in that direction.

    My issue was the rain that comes down from all directions, it gets UP under the tarp/rainfly. If you have not pitched your rainfly tightly it is likely to rip. We have gale force winds frequently.

    I finely purchased a Typhoon from Hennessy, which I dislike, it is too dark and heavy. I made a clone out of Silnylon that I like. Now I batten down everything and I stay dry (so far, anyway).

  3. #13
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
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    Fourteen miles is a pretty long way to go to experiment with your weather protection. I hope you have adequate rain gear for the hike. Like Ironfish45, I have no problem with straight-down rain but I'm in a coastal area and it comes from all directions.

    I hear folks talk about site selection, but they must have winds that predictably come from the same direction. I can get all set up so my tarp takes the wind broadside, and then the wind shifts and I'm soaked.

    I now have a 4S tarp with doors, but it's not very wide (8.5 ft) and I would really have to pitch it low to fight the conditions I'm talking about.

    I hope you don't get conditions like that. If you have a poncho or something, you can hang it to act like a wind block at the end of the tarp that is getting wet. Bring some clips or something to secure it to the tarp/ridgeline.

  4. #14
    Bubba's Avatar
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    If you are expecting a lot of rain and for the sake of your fiance, you may consider bringing an extra tarp for cooking and storing gear etc. You may not have one but eventually I can see you getting a bigger one for yourself so maybe now is the time to get it. Its always useful to have spare tarps anyways if you camp in different seasons or with a larger group.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  5. #15
    Yoda's Avatar
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    Any tips for hamocking in the rain?

    Yes learn from the master "Dutch" and the rain will never touch you..........
    Formerly known as "Cranky Bear"....

    "yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, but today is a gift---thats why its called a present" - Master Oogway

    It's always best if your an early riser!

    I like hiking as it's like exercise!

    My Blog

  6. #16
    Senior Member
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    I agree with a lot that's been said already.

    1. Make sure you've got tarps with plenty of protection. You can use a smaller tarp, but you have to be much more aware of site selection and wind direction. Using a larger tarp, especially one with doors, can reduce your requirements for site selection by providing more protection.

    2. Hang the tarp first. That also means keep the tarp easily accessible in your backpack. Either keep it packed in an outer pocket or on top, so that you can get it out quickly and easily without digging through your gear trying to find it...and soaking yourself and the rest of your gear in the process.

    3. Have a plan for packing out a wet tarp. It's easy to forget that you've gotta pack and carry out that tarp when it's wet...even in skins, you might have to rethink how you're carrying it to avoid getting the rest of your gear wet.

    4. Have an extra tarp to protect gear, cook under, or to throw over your firewood if you're building a fire at some point.

    5. Drip lines are your FRIENDS!

    6. Pitch the tarp with a steep angle on the sides, and low to the ground to prevent wind or heavy rain from driving into your sheltered area and splashing/spattering onto the underside of your hammock and gear.

    7. Trash bags are a hiker's good buddy! I carry two 55 gal, 3 mil contractor bags. One is my pack/gear cover for under my hammock in lousy conditions, the other is my ground pad/anti-mud zone under the hammock. It's also a good idea to pack all of your gear INSIDE your backpack into a trash bag as well...so that your stuff stays dry no matter how much rain you hike through.

    8. A dry change of clothes to sleep in makes a world of difference. Most folks don't like the extra weight...but I personally prefer to have a change of clothes to sleep in. If your hiking gear gets wet on the way in, dry it out over a fire while you're wearing the clothes you plan to sleep in. And dry socks to sleep in are a MUST in most cold, wet conditions.

    9. Warm drinks both at night and in the morning can do wonders for morale. Bring tea/coffee/cocoa to have both at night and in the morning. Another, "different" drink that I learned to love when I was out and about in the military...it sounds funky, but it's awesome when you need it...is any kind of fruit jello mix. Just add it to warm/hot water...it can go a long ways to restore a bit of energy and a lot of comfort.

    10. Have a backup plan if the weather really gets bad. Don't try to hero through if it gets nasty...especially if you're not overly experienced and neither is your friend. If it gets nasty, and you try to tough it out, she may not want to go out there with you again.

  7. #17

    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by titanium_hiker View Post
    Here's a great website on staying dry, by our own JustJeff.

    http://tothewoods.net/HammockCampingDry.html
    Nice site with good information. Thanks for posting

  8. #18
    Bubba's Avatar
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    Quick dry clothing is certainly helpful. I still see people on the trail wearing jeans which is fine in fair weather but not the best choice for being wet and cold. They don't need to be expensive high tech outdoor clothing just the proper material. I wear outdoor pants from Costco that were $20 and they perform well.

    In the past I have taken some cues from jungle survival and have a "wet outfit" that I accept will always be wet and then have something dry to hang and sleep in. Fortunately I don't get cold easily so I'm not uncomfortable wearing wet or damp clothing as long as the temps are not too low.
    Last edited by Bubba; 10-05-2012 at 10:27.
    Don't let life get in the way of living.

  9. #19
    un-assembled! Groovy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spaceweaseal View Post
    Put the tarp as low as posable and make sure your head or foot end is not facing into the wind. Set it up at home in storm mode, (low and tight) and sray the heck out of it with your water hose to check your setup.
    I know it sounds stupid but it will give you a idea of what works and what does not work.
    Happy hanging


    If I get a chance tomorrow I will set my Siam to get some pics for you of what I am talking about..
    Great bit of advise. It is so much better to master your set up at home and hopefully stay more dry on the trail. Try putting it up and taking it down while the sprinkler is on full blast.
    "When you get to the end of your rope,tie a knot and Hang On."- Franklin D. Roosevelt

  10. #20
    New Member
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    May 2012
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    Conway, AR
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    Thanks for all the tips everyone, it's not raining yet so hopefully we'll get one good night out there. We'll be leaving in a couple hours after I'm off work(on lunch). I'll report back on how it went

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