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  1. #1
    New Member
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    Hammock sock advice

    I'm new to gear making, but i think a hammock sock is within my current abilities.

    I'd like to add a few degrees to the comfort zone of my current setup, I think most of my heat loss at this point is due to the unpredictable wind, and near constant rain. I'd like to keep the design close to the envelope/burrito bivvy style for use as a go-to-ground backup, but that may need to be sacrificed for hammocking comfort.

    First i'd like to make the sock out of Tyvek because that's what I already have in bulk, and honestly the first prototype is going to be most useful as a teaching experience.
    Could I enhance its breathability with small perforations on the lower half and end venting, or should i just plan the layout around a section of lightweight nylon to provide additional permeability?

    Any advice for working around the tieouts of my blackbird, or should i ignore them on the initial prototype in favor of modification after the build?

    Last of all, should the sock be suspended on its own ridgeline to keep airspace between my hammock? will the difference even be noticeable?

    Please kindly lend me the benefit of your experience.

    -Mitch

  2. #2
    Senior Member hangnout's Avatar
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    I have been working on a couple hammock sock projects. Hammock socks that are going to be used under a tarp are fairly easy. Keep the top half as breathable as possible and the bottom as wind resistant as possible. Hammock socks designed to be used without a tarp are a challenge

    Quote Originally Posted by polarbear.mitch View Post
    Could I enhance its breathability with small perforations on the lower half and end venting, or should i just plan the layout around a section of lightweight nylon to provide additional permeability?
    If used under a tarp I would use the lightweight nylon on the top half to keep it as breathable as possible. The tyvek on the bottom will help stop the wind from stealing heat from the uq's.

    Quote Originally Posted by polarbear.mitch View Post
    Any advice for working around the tieouts of my blackbird, or should i ignore them on the initial prototype in favor of modification after the build?
    I would not use the tie outs with a sock, in fact I don't use them without a sock

    Quote Originally Posted by polarbear.mitch View Post
    Last of all, should the sock be suspended on its own ridgeline to keep airspace between my hammock? will the difference even be noticeable?
    If used under a tarp just use the hammock ridge line. If the sock is used for rain protection use it's own ridge line.

    Hope this helps. Keep us updated on your sock project.

    Welcome to the "madness" One diy project always leads to another, and another, and ...................

  3. #3
    Doctari's Avatar
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    If you are going to add ventilation holes, do so on the top part, preferably over your face / head area. I agree with hangnout: top as breathable as possible, the bottom as wind proof as possible. Mine is waterproof, so it has an issue with water (sweat) accumulating on / in it, so if you can, go windproof, but not waterproof.

    AND: with the colder temps (well below freezing) I've had frost build up on BUG NETTING! So, I am thinking of putting a few 1" holes at head level in my BBO. It probably won't help much with the frost on the bug netting, but if I can reduce the snow in my face, I'm OK with that.
    When you have a backpack on, no matter where you are, you’re home.
    PAIN is INEVITABLE. MISERY is OPTIONAL.

  4. #4
    Lost_Biker's Avatar
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    I made a sock for my WBBB from 1.1 ripstop and gain 10 - 15 degrees in trapped heat. My ripstop is breathable and I have not had any condensation problems worth mentioning hammocking here in Indiana winters down to 10 degrees.

    OldGringo here on the forums once said he made a sock from Tyvec - you may want to contact him with some questions since Tyvec is a vapor barrier and you will have condensation without lots of ventilation. I have seen several hammockers use Tyvec for a bottom protector and a breathable material for the top. Any kind of fabric thats not coated will work - even an old/new bed sheet. You would be surprised at how much heat a thin cotton sheet can trap.

  5. #5
    Fish<><'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lost_Biker View Post
    I made a sock for my WBBB from 1.1 ripstop and gain 10 - 15 degrees in trapped heat. My ripstop is breathable and I have not had any condensation problems worth mentioning hammocking here in Indiana winters down to 10 degrees.

    OldGringo here on the forums once said he made a sock from Tyvec - you may want to contact him with some questions since Tyvec is a vapor barrier and you will have condensation without lots of ventilation. I have seen several hammockers use Tyvec for a bottom protector and a breathable material for the top. Any kind of fabric thats not coated will work - even an old/new bed sheet. You would be surprised at how much heat a thin cotton sheet can trap.
    +1 to that. I used a fleece blanket one time and I felt like I was inside my house.

    However if you want a dedicated sock, look at canvas. Considering you are in Alaska you won't have the condensation to worry about most of the year.
    "We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it."- G. W. Sears

    My forum name is Fish<><; I'm in the navy; and I hate sleeping on the ground. If I didn't need ground to walk on or measure resistance to, I think I could happily give it up.

  6. #6
    mbiraman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fish<>< View Post
    +1 to that. I used a fleece blanket one time and I felt like I was inside my house.

    However if you want a dedicated sock, look at canvas. Considering you are in Alaska you won't have the condensation to worry about most of the year.

    Just a note about the canvas idea. Its a good idea when real cold but if your on the south coast of Alaska that gets allot of wet and 20-35f kind of temp then breathable rip stop might be better. if your going into the interior for some dry cold than canvas could come into play.
    Go into the video area and look up "frozen butt camp video". I think that's the one where Macintyre and 4Dog talk about the canvas Seep.

    bill
    " The mind creates the abyss, the heart crosses it."

    “The measure of your life will not be in what you accumulate, but in what you give away.” ~Wayne Dyer

    www.birchsidecustomwoodwork.com

  7. #7
    Brute1100's Avatar
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    On the bed sheet idea... It works... I had to use one one night as temps dropped well below what I was expected with a windy cool front... I was car camping with family but all we had were sheets... I played on a fleece blanket which was adequate and then was trying to sleep under my usual sheet but wasn't enough with the wind... So I got another twin sheet and ran it over my ridgeline and then between my hammock and bug net basically making a sock... It worked wonderfully... Slept the rest of the night and when I slid back the sheet in the morning I was amazed at how cool it was, and even more so when I unzipped the bug net... Never realized how much warmth the bug net held till that night, and I was thankful for it...
    Live, Laugh, Love, if that doesn't work. Load, Aim and Fire, repeat as necessary...

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  8. #8
    Lost_Biker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fish<>< View Post
    +1 to that. I used a fleece blanket one time and I felt like I was inside my house.

    However if you want a dedicated sock, look at canvas. Considering you are in Alaska you won't have the condensation to worry about most of the year.

    +1 for canvas sock for deep cold. Has to be really cold - way below freezing.

    Here's the post about Tyvek http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ad.php?t=37321

    Here's a post about canvas socks from MacEntyre http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ad.php?t=28561

  9. #9
    in it for the naps oldgringo's Avatar
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    A hammock sock is like your lawn...you may have a heavy dew, or you may not, and you may have condensation issues. Or not. You can make an educated guess in the evening, but only dawn knows the truth.

    My Tyvek sock wasn't a failure, but it wasn't an unqualified success, either. I found that if I vented it enough to control moisture, that warm, moist air rising out of the vent set up a convective loop that pumped cold air in. Yes, it blocked wind, mist, fog, etc, but it failed to create a warmish micro-climate.

    Do a search for "hammock socks". You'll find a wealth of good info. Good luck.

    Btw, a good source for lightweight canvas is painter's drop cloths.
    Dave

    http://www.uark.edu/misc/xtimber/rna/pattonsbluff.html

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  10. #10
    WV's Avatar
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    If you like using the side tie-outs on your BB, try to incorporate them into your sock design. My winter sock/tent has short (4") bungees that connect to my DIY hammock tieout points. Then the sock ties out to the tarp corners, and thence to the ground - saves on stakes and lines. I think keeping the side of the sock from touching the hammock helps protect from wind.

    Do use a panel of fabric that breathes well overhead. If it's calendared, put the shiny smooth side in. I like the tiny tyvek footprint of my sock tent. It's easy to sweep out the snow and ice. For a sock bottom section tyvek might be pretty good. Try to include a slit at the very bottom that you can open to let the ice out in the morning.

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