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  1. #1

    DIT under quilt...PLEASE HELP!!!

    so im going to try and make an underquilt out of 1.1 ripstop and 800fill down...one question tho...

    in all of the "instructables" i have seen, people are somehow sewing no-see-um mesh "baffles" between the two shell layers...i dont quite understand how this is supposed to work.

    can you not simply sew the inside and outside ripstop pieces together and then sew channels to fill with down?

    i may be over complicating this but i cant seem to properly follow any of these instructions requiring the mesh "baffles"...any help is greatly appreciated

  2. #2
    Senior Member CatSplat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bushcraftbasics View Post
    so im going to try and make an underquilt out of 1.1 ripstop and 800fill down...one question tho...

    in all of the "instructables" i have seen, people are somehow sewing no-see-um mesh "baffles" between the two shell layers...i dont quite understand how this is supposed to work.

    can you not simply sew the inside and outside ripstop pieces together and then sew channels to fill with down?

    i may be over complicating this but i cant seem to properly follow any of these instructions requiring the mesh "baffles"...any help is greatly appreciated
    Sewing channels by sewing the inner and outer layer directly together is absolutely possible (it's called a "sewn-through" design) but it has compromises. A quilt keeps you warm by surrounding you with an area of contained, non-moving air, which is what the down insulation provides. The thicker that insulating layer, the warmer the quilt will keep you. With a sewn-through design, that thickness alternates between full loft (thickness) in the center of the baffle chamber and zero loft at the sewn-through seams. This design is common in warm-weather (40+) top quilts, but doesn't work well for warmer quilts that require more consistent insulation.

    That's where the "baffle" design comes in - the noseeum (or nylon, or whatever) baffle dividers make sure that there is a minimum thickness to the quilt in all areas. It is more complicated to prepare and construct, but if you're making a three-or-four-season quilt it's necessary to make the quilt usable in those weather conditions. Full-length, full-width, and Karo-step baffles are a few kinds of baffle systems that retain a minimum loft.

    Have a gander at Lost Biker's DIY UQ thread, he's got lots of good pics of the process and there's some baffle-sewing-specific links on the 3rd page.

    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ad.php?t=59310
    Last edited by CatSplat; 10-16-2012 at 17:39.

  3. #3
    Lost_Biker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CatSplat View Post
    Sewing channels by sewing the inner and outer layer directly together is absolutely possible (it's called a "sewn-through" design) but it has compromises. A quilt keeps you warm by surrounding you with an area of contained, non-moving air, which is what the down insulation provides. The thicker that insulating layer, the warmer the quilt will keep you. With a sewn-through design, that thickness alternates between full loft (thickness) in the center of the baffle chamber and zero loft at the sewn-through seams. This design is common in warm-weather (40+) top quilts, but doesn't work well for warmer quilts that require more consistent insulation.

    That's where the "baffle" design comes in - the noseeum (or nylon, or whatever) baffle dividers make sure that there is a minimum thickness to the quilt in all areas. It is more complicated to prepare and construct, but if you're making a three-or-four-season quilt it's necessary to make the quilt usable in those weather conditions. Full-length, full-width, and Karo-step baffles are a few kinds of baffle systems that retain a minimum loft.

    Have a gander at Lost Biker's DIY UQ thread, he's got lots of good pics of the process and there's some baffle-sewing-specific links on the 3rd page.

    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ad.php?t=59310
    Thanks for the explanation CatSplat - I wish I could have said it so well in my post.

  4. #4
    Senior Member nom@d's Avatar
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    In this picture, i have sewn all my noseeum to one side, im getting ready to sew my noseeum along the yellow line to the blue line on the grey piece of ripstop. In order to do that I rolled the edge of the green ripstop up and sewed the noseeum to the grey, then rolled and sewed, ect. hope this helped.


  5. #5
    Burning at both ends Dblcorona's Avatar
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    Just a quick recommendation if you decide to do a sewn through design. Don't sew the sides first. Leave those for last and start you sewing from the center out. And there is nothing wrong with pinning things to together.

    I know this is a top quilt, but it was a sewn through so maybe this helps you visualize it.
    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ad.php?t=36379
    "We don't stop hiking because we grow old,
    we grow old because we stop hiking."

    -- Finis Mitchell,

  6. #6
    Hot damm!!! Thank you guys so much for clarifying that, now I feel really stupid...
    and now for my next trick: why not just use your Hammock as the inner layer to your underquilt so it's all 1 piece??? seems to me that it would not only save weight but set-up time as well... am I on to something or missing something?

  7. #7
    Senior Member FLScouthanger's Avatar
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    Bushcraft,

    Just Jeff (and I'm sure there are probably others) have previously done the exact thing you describe. Basically integrating the under quilt onto the hammock. Suggest you go to Just Jeff's website to read about the "warm hammock" and the associated trip report(s).

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