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  1. #1
    New Member tacticaldruid's Avatar
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    doesn't your ridge line experience high stress with a far apart hang

    i am a big guy at 6'4 300 lbs I used 1/8 woopies for peace of mind overkill, should i consider 7/64 ridgeline . at my weight that puts a tone of stress on the ridgeline with a far apart hang
    Keep your Feet in the dust and your head out of the sand

  2. #2
    Senior Member Roe Ring's Avatar
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    The WBBB ridge line is 7/64 amsteel as standard. Unless your really counting the grams, I would go for it. I often end up with a very tight RL on my BB.

    Atb

    Mark

  3. #3
    Senior Member Latch's Avatar
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    Ive noticed that when I hang at max (19-20ft) apart that the ridgeline is tighter than it should be but I think you should be fine.... the line is much stronger than you would think!

  4. #4
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    For the situation you're describing, 7/64" amsteel would be a good choice for the ridge line.

  5. #5

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    If the angle of the suspension (from the point of attachment on the hammock and on the tree) remains the same - then the amount of force remains the same. However, on trees further apart, if you are not able to attach the suspension high enough, the angle becomes 'flatter'. In that case, the force on the suspension becomes much greater.
    I thought I had a spreadsheet that showed this but can't seem to find it. Hopefully, someone else will be able to provide the science.
    You are correct in being concerned - however, I think 1/8" amsteel probably is rated high enough to handle your application. Remember though, that everything in the suspension - tree straps, hardware, suspension line, and hammock material - is subjected to the same forces.

    Edit: now that I reread your question, I realize that I may not have answered what you asked. I was thinking of the whoopies that extend from hammock to tree. If you are speaking of a structural ridgeline - then I must admit I know nothing of them. It appears that a structural ridgeline, such as used in the Warbonnet, does not need to support the same weight that the end suspension lines have to.

  6. #6
    WV's Avatar
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    You're doing the right thing in using 1/8" amsteel for your whoopies. The main suspension line can encounter twice the force of the individual hammock suspension line and the ridge line when the sag angle of the main line drops from 30 to 15. I've found that if I have to pull my suspension as tight as I can, what looks like a 5 sag angle becomes 15 when I get in my hammock. That means the ridge line and the individual hammock suspension lines are each hold 1x my body weight, and the main whoopies to the trees are holding 2x. Thus 7/64" amsteel is fine for the srl and hammock lines (as the other posters suggested), and 1/8" whoopies should keep you happily in the air.

  7. #7
    MDSH's Avatar
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    The flatter/shallower the suspension angle might become the more the SRL works. One could theoretically have a 0* angle and so all elements of the suspension (straps, suspension, and structural ridge line) would need to bear the 1000+ pounds of force exerted at that point. But even loaded to give 5* or 15* that's a lot of force with which to reckon.

    Have you seen this, tactical? http://theultimatehang.com/hammock-hang-calculator.html

    Mike

  8. #8
    New Member tacticaldruid's Avatar
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    As always , invaluable information and advice.
    Thank you hope to hang with you all soon .
    Keep your Feet in the dust and your head out of the sand

  9. #9
    Senior Member DemostiX's Avatar
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    Read WV's reply again

    There's a spreadsheet with calculations that include the stretch of the line.

    David has given an example of how that stretch and the stretch of the loaded hammock change the angle and distribute the load more evenly than you may fear. Start with flat angles, and it doesn't take much stretch to normalize. That's why the best-known table, the one most often thrown up here, is a strong caution, but overstates the load on the whoopies (or straps) from a flat pre-loaded hang.

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