Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    EC
    Hammock
    Warbonnet Blackbird 1.1 Dbl Layer
    Tarp
    Warbonnet Superfly
    Insulation
    JRB UQ / UGQ TQ
    Suspension
    Straps / Binders
    Posts
    31

    Bridge vs. Non-Bridge

    Just looking for a listing of pro's and con's of bridge vs. non-bridge hammocks. I have a WBBB (really like it), but have been keeping an eye on this new Ridge Runner. Without trying it, there appears to be a few things I like, a few I don't, and some things that I question, like the diagonal vs. straight laying. Ex; Can you lay flatter in a bridge or diagonally, in a non-bridge?

  2. #2
    stevebo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Moreland Georgia
    Hammock
    WBRR, bluebridge grizz bridge,
    Tarp
    cloudburst
    Insulation
    lynx
    Suspension
    wb straps
    Posts
    1,511
    Hands down, a bridge gives you a flatter lay. On the down side, you have to deal with spreader bars, extra rigging, a bigger tarp etc. They are both pretty cool, and I own one of each!
    “The two most common elements in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity.”
    Harlan Ellison


    Do not walk behind me, for I may not lead. Do not walk ahead of me, for I may not follow. Do not walk beside me, either, just leave me alone.
    --unknown

  3. #3
    BillyBob58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Tupelo, MS
    Posts
    8,465
    Images
    353
    bridge Pros
    1: Leg comfort ( lack of calf pressure points and knee hyper-extension) can not be beat by any non-bridge I have tried, and actually the bridge is superior to almost all non-bridge in this category. Plus more consistant: IOW, some times some non-bridge come very close to my JRB BMBH in this area, but on another night not so much.

    2: repeat above for side sleeping with out any side discomfort from being curved in the wrong direction, with legs straight or slight fetal. The bridge is almost always the winner in this area, though sometimes some non-bridge come quite close on some nights.

    3: ease of UQ ( and even TQ ) use ( all of this just based on my opinion per my personal experience). With the exception of using a Pea Pod, it just seems like less opportunity for set up error and snafus when putting MY UQs ( JRB MWs ) onto a JRB BMBH ( old original model). It just always works about as expected, I'm not sure how any one could set it up not to work perfectly if a reasonable attempt was made to follow JRB direction. First set up should take all of 5 mins and should work perfectly 1st time and all other times. There won't be any potential gaps or leaks around the foot or head end edges, and no creases in the hammock which can act as cold air funnels and highways. TQs seem to me easier to keep in place.

    4: If you like to use pads in a hammock, a bridge hammock with pad pocket is hands down the most comfortable way to do this.

    Bridge cons:
    1: generally looses to many non-bridges in the roomy shoulder area ( and for many in shoulder comfort) unless the spreader bars are several inches wider than on the JRBs. Not a significant problem for some of us, but more so for others
    2: Spreader bars have a potential for interfering with tarp coverage and even for tarp damage and for equal coverage would require a larger heavier tarp than for a non-bridge.
    3: wider bars used to provide more shoulder room ( and maybe knee room for side/fetal position) would most likely increase the tarp/bar problems even more
    4: Bars are going to add maybe 6 oz or more to the weight of the hammock, and are one more thing to keep up with and find a place for in your pack. You can rig some hiking poles to function as spreader bars, but I often use my poles to rig a tarp porch or to serve as a pull out "tree/post" for my tarp, which increases room for my bars. But if I use the hiking poles as spreader bars, I loose that function. I guess I could use fallen branches with my tarp porch? Still, a hassle.
    5: unless using those pretty wide bars to get that much improved shoulder room, full fetal position is probably going to be easier in a non-bridge hammock.

    All I can think of at the moment! Pick your poison!
    For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed to us....that the creation itself also will be set free from its slavery to corruption into the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now.
    Romans 8:18,21-22

  4. #4
    BrianWillan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Oshawa, Ontario, Canada
    Hammock
    Martian Bridge (DIY)
    Tarp
    Ogee / UGQ B.A.T.
    Insulation
    HG Inc-BE / Wiggys
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    1,869
    Images
    7
    On the pro side for bridge hammocks is zero calf pressure. They give a much flatter lay, IMHO, than a gathered end hammock.

    If you are a DIY type person, an underquilt for a bridge hammock is a simple rectangle. No complicated 3D geometry needed. I've bought 1 bridge hammock and made 2, and I feel bridge hammocks make for a better lounging chair. I also find they are easier to exit than a gathered end hammock.

    On the con side, there is the issue of spreader bars to consider when packing and pitching your tarp. However I feel the benefits far outweigh this item. If you are a fit lightweight person your trekking poles can be used a spreader bars there by reducing the overall weight of your hammock.

    Cheers

    Brian
    Good judgment comes from experience, and often experience comes from bad judgment. - Unknown

    Eastern Great Lakes Trip Planning Announcement thread. Subscribe to keep informed on upcoming group hangs in this area.

  5. #5
    Acer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Southern Indiana Wooded Hills
    Hammock
    WBRR, BMBH UL, Diy M90 MR Gathered
    Tarp
    HG Cuben 4/Tadpole
    Insulation
    Lynx/UGQ/TeWa
    Suspension
    Straps/Dutch Bling
    Posts
    3,808
    Images
    14
    I have been sleeping in a BMHB Ul now quite a few months every nite and its the best comfort and sleep I have in any hammock,,just this week, pulled out my DYI Momentum 90 ripstop which is way softer feeling, but after 2 nites, jumped right back to the Bridge and slept like a baby last nite..all but no comparson for me, the Bridge rocks. One thing about a bridge,,if you get one, give it a chance by learning the lay of it and getting it adjusted the way you want. Takes a dash of time, but to me,,well worth it. I took a new BMHB UL and totally revamped it including striping the bug net off it and getting it down to 14 oz or so without the spreader bars so lots of options using the bridge the way you want it.

  6. #6
    hairbear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    n e missouri
    Hammock
    wbrr/d i y speer
    Tarp
    hg 4sccc 12 foot
    Insulation
    lynx/w/logics
    Suspension
    straps /pole mod
    Posts
    968
    Quote Originally Posted by BillyBob58 View Post
    bridge Pros
    1: Leg comfort ( lack of calf pressure points and knee hyper-extension) can not be beat by any non-bridge I have tried, and actually the bridge is superior to almost all non-bridge in this category. Plus more consistant: IOW, some times some non-bridge come very close to my JRB BMBH in this area, but on another night not so much.

    2: repeat above for side sleeping with out any side discomfort from being curved in the wrong direction, with legs straight or slight fetal. The bridge is almost always the winner in this area, though sometimes some non-bridge come quite close on some nights.

    3: ease of UQ ( and even TQ ) use ( all of this just based on my opinion per my personal experience). With the exception of using a Pea Pod, it just seems like less opportunity for set up error and snafus when putting MY UQs ( JRB MWs ) onto a JRB BMBH ( old original model). It just always works about as expected, I'm not sure how any one could set it up not to work perfectly if a reasonable attempt was made to follow JRB direction. First set up should take all of 5 mins and should work perfectly 1st time and all other times. There won't be any potential gaps or leaks around the foot or head end edges, and no creases in the hammock which can act as cold air funnels and highways. TQs seem to me easier to keep in place.

    4: If you like to use pads in a hammock, a bridge hammock with pad pocket is hands down the most comfortable way to do this.

    Bridge cons:
    1: generally looses to many non-bridges in the roomy shoulder area ( and for many in shoulder comfort) unless the spreader bars are several inches wider than on the JRBs. Not a significant problem for some of us, but more so for others
    2: Spreader bars have a potential for interfering with tarp coverage and even for tarp damage and for equal coverage would require a larger heavier tarp than for a non-bridge.
    3: wider bars used to provide more shoulder room ( and maybe knee room for side/fetal position) would most likely increase the tarp/bar problems even more
    4: Bars are going to add maybe 6 oz or more to the weight of the hammock, and are one more thing to keep up with and find a place for in your pack. You can rig some hiking poles to function as spreader bars, but I often use my poles to rig a tarp porch or to serve as a pull out "tree/post" for my tarp, which increases room for my bars. But if I use the hiking poles as spreader bars, I loose that function. I guess I could use fallen branches with my tarp porch? Still, a hassle.
    5: unless using those pretty wide bars to get that much improved shoulder room, full fetal position is probably going to be easier in a non-bridge hammock.

    All I can think of at the moment! Pick your poison!
    +1 very well said

  7. #7
    Senior Member ibgary's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    Hammock
    Dangerbird, (custom) thanks Papa
    Tarp
    10x10 DIY
    Insulation
    DIY insultex.
    Suspension
    Woopie, UCR
    Posts
    467
    I have a Lawson Blue Ridge. With that you sleep at the level of the spreaderbars rather than below. It feels more like a king size cot than a hammock. It is tippy unless you tie off a corner. It its tied off it is as stable as a table.

  8. #8
    New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Directly Above the Center of the Earth
    Posts
    49
    I've only had a DIY gathered end hammock and now a new RR. If there is a better hammock than the RR I'd sure like to try that too. The RR has a very flat lay, excellent visibility out the sides, and no shoulder squeeze whatsoever. Beat that. Pretty tough to do. Could be lighter a la the Grizz bridge, or the 14 oz. stripped down BMBH UL . Although a stripped down single layer RR would be similar.

  9. #9
    Senior Member SoundMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Lititz, PA
    Hammock
    BlackBird dbl 1.1+Dutchware
    Tarp
    SuperFly+Dutchware
    Insulation
    HG & Mamba
    Suspension
    Straps+Dutchware
    Posts
    361
    Images
    6
    I have not fell in love with any of the bridges i have laid in......I do want to give them another chance. Hopefully an all nighter!!!
    "The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench,a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free,and good men die like dogs.There's also a negative side"
    Hunter S. Thompson


    Greg

  10. #10
    FreeRange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Lititz, PA
    Hammock
    WBRR
    Tarp
    Cloudburst
    Insulation
    Lynx/Burrow
    Suspension
    Bridge
    Posts
    138
    This is a good question to ponder and the points made above are all valid. I had a chance to hang in a WBRR at MAHHA (thanks Jesse) and found it to be quite comfortable for my size - in fact perfect. But I only spent a few minutes in the bridge and do not know what a full night would feel like.

    I too do not like the calf pressure that is prevalent in most gathered hammocks and found the RR to be very roomy and comfy. My concerns are as follows:
    1. Do I need to invest in a new tarp and under quilt to fit the bridge?
    2. Is the weight difference worth it?

    2Q is putting a Center Pole mod and doors on my MacCat Deluxe. That might (should) do it. I'm not sure about the insulation although I'm going to guess that my Phoenix or Incubator should be fine. The weight thing is subjective to the individual.

    Brandon at Warbonnet is running a sale on the netless RR SL this weekend. I'm thinking about it Greg (you thought I might).

    Jerry

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •