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  1. #21
    FreeRange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Lititz, PA
    Hammock
    WBRR
    Tarp
    Cloudburst
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    Lynx/Burrow
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    Bridge
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    138
    I tried the WBRR at the recent MAHHA. One of the members gave a show and tell. It was all good. The lay was flat and very comfortable. You could easily lie on your side. I must say that the RR was the most comfortable hammock I've had an opportunity to lie in. . . . but I don't have the experience of spending a night or two in it to really evaluate the comfort, ease of set-up/take down fit of quilts, etc.

    The weight is another factor. I'm trying to go lighter.

    I also hate to invest and have to sell it if it doesn't work out. Been there, done that.

  2. #22
    we should have some no-net ridgerunners on the website in a day or 2.

  3. #23
    FreeRange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Lititz, PA
    Hammock
    WBRR
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    138
    Quote Originally Posted by warbonnetguy View Post
    we should have some no-net ridgerunners on the website in a day or 2.
    Do you have a weight on the no net RR?

  4. #24
    HappyCamper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    WV
    Hammock
    Warbonnet BB, 1.1 single
    Tarp
    JRB11x10 Z-P cuben
    Insulation
    Yeti JRB WestMtg
    Suspension
    webbing, Dutchclip
    Posts
    3,523
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    47
    Quote Originally Posted by lymphocytosis View Post
    I also really enjoy the "cradled" feeling I get in gathered end hammocks.
    This is a great way of describing gathered end hammocks. That's exactly the feeling I love about my Blackbird.
    I intend to live forever, or die trying. -- Groucho Marx (1890 - 1977)

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Free-Range View Post
    Do you have a weight on the no net RR?
    just weighed one at 21oz (double layer no-net w/adj webbing suspension) not counting the spreaders...so about 6oz lighter without the netting and zipper. (a single layer would be another 3oz less, and line/strap suspension would be another 2.5 less, so single layer no-net with line/strap should be around 15.5oz based on the math)

    haven't figured the price yet

  6. #26
    Member trekr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    central NC
    Hammock
    Grizz Bridge
    Tarp
    diy
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    Leigh's UQ
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    Posts
    60
    [QUOTE]just weighed one at 21oz (double layer no-net w/adj webbing suspension) not counting the spreaders...so about 6oz lighter without the netting and zipper. (a single layer would be another 3oz less, and line/strap suspension would be another 2.5 less, so single layer no-net with line/strap should be around 15.5oz based on the math)

    Wow, a RR under a pound. That is getting interesting!

  7. #27
    Senior Member affreeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Quincy, MA
    Hammock
    Darien UL 11'
    Tarp
    HG Cuben Fiber Hex
    Insulation
    JRB TQ & UQ
    Suspension
    Whoopie slings
    Posts
    211
    I've hiked with my RidgeRunner for 5 or 6 nights now. My reactions:

    Plusses:
    - Dead nuts easy, idiot proof installation of bottom insulation with the purpose designed Lynx UQ
    - Very comfortable

    Minuses:
    - Greater distance between trees needed for hang compared to my Hennessy gathered-end hammock. This has proven to be more of an issue than I expected.
    - Weight! Both the greater weight of the hammock with its spreader bars, and the added weight of the necessarily larger tarp.
    ~
    "Home is where I hang my food bag."

    Monkeywrench
    Allen Freeman
    allen@allenf.com
    www.allenf.com
    blog.allenf.com

  8. #28
    Cali's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Modoc, SC
    Hammock
    HHDJ/Speer/T-Bird/WBBB/Lite Owl
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    SF/CF/Cloudburst
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    Incub/Buro/Snugfit
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    Cinch Straps
    Posts
    3,324
    I am hoping someone has the WBRR at the next local hang I go to, so I can try it out.

    Do you hear that SC Hangers???
    Last edited by Cali; 10-31-2012 at 09:02.
    Happy Hangin!!!


    AKA BajaHanger

    You cannot solve a problem with the same mind that created it. -Albert Einstein

  9. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    omaha, ne
    Posts
    260
    Quote Originally Posted by affreeman View Post
    I've hiked with my RidgeRunner for 5 or 6 nights now. My reactions:

    Plusses:
    - Dead nuts easy, idiot proof installation of bottom insulation with the purpose designed Lynx UQ
    - Very comfortable

    Minuses:
    - Greater distance between trees needed for hang compared to my Hennessy gathered-end hammock. This has proven to be more of an issue than I expected.
    - Weight! Both the greater weight of the hammock with its spreader bars, and the added weight of the necessarily larger tarp.
    Definately agree about the tree distance. Finding that kind of spacing between trees that dont have alot of shrubs or something else betweent them can prove difficult.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Mustardman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Hammock
    Warbonnet Blackbird/Ridgerunner
    Tarp
    OES 12x10
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    WB Yeti/Lynx
    Posts
    2,302
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    42
    Quote Originally Posted by BajaHanger View Post
    Thank you all for your comments. The WBRR looks like a really great hammock, but I still like to stretch my leg up on the side of the gathered end hammock and I can't do that with the bridge. I may change my mind later.
    The Ridgerunner is not deep AT ALL - it's quite easy to press your leg up over the edge a bit, without feeling like you're going to come out of the hammock. I regularly lay in a figure 4 position with my legs, and both arms over my head, palms below my head, with my elbows sticking straight out, and have plenty of room. Stretching the leg up to the side is absolutely not a problem in the ridgerunner. Sure, you might press on the netting a bit, but the netting on the RR is loose, and as long as you've got a layer of clothing or insulation between you and the net, bugs won't be an issue.

    One of the most-praised features of the ridgerunner is the massive amount of space to the side of your head. Nearly every person who I've let try ours has immediately done the hands-behind-the-head pose within the first couple of minutes of laying in the hammock. I can think of no other hammock, apart from those old rope-and-spreader deals, that allows you that much space to stretch out your elbows.

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