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  1. #1
    New Member
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    Suspension question

    First, hello and thanks for the info. I've been quite overwhelmed by all of it.

    After many glowing reviews, I will be ordering my warbonnet soon.

    I still have some questions. One is of suspension. I cut and pasted this from the how to order thread:

    "Suspension is included in the price, but you choose between line/tree straps or 28’ of webbing and 4’ of line for making an adjustable webbing suspension. Webbing is 2000# 1” polyester camo pattern, line is 3mm amsteel blue (grey) also rated to 2000#. Tree straps have a single 4g welded ring in one loop to prevent “wear-through”
    Webbing: 6.5oz (adjustment hardware NOT included) (2) 14’ pieces with loop in one end
    Line/straps: 4.3oz (2) 6’ straps and (2) 8’lines"

    So, why would one order one over the other?

    Second, I am leaning toward the double layer given my weight (210 lbs) and the ability to place a sleeping pad in there. Does anyone have a double layer and can comment about the effectiveness of this over sticking the pad in the hammock?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mustardman's Avatar
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    Aug 2008
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    The webbing-only suspension is heavier, but if you use ring buckles and carabiners, it's much quicker and easier to rig. The rope suspension takes a little bit more time to hang, but it's lighter and less bulky. So it's a question of what's important to you.

    As far as the pad slot, I've had mixed success with it - the hammock is so huge on the inside that the pad is able to shift around inside the slot quite a bit. If you don't toss and turn a lot, the pad will pretty much stay underneath you, but if you're a light sleeper like me, who moves around a lot during the night, the pad slot might not work as well.

    That said, I still think the double layer is a good idea. It will help the hammock fabric to stretch less, and therefore give you a flatter lay. It's also good to have the option, the pad slot might work a lot better for you than it does for me - I'm using a thick inflatable pad with somewhat slick fabric on the outside. A "stickier", thinner foam mat might stay in place much better.

  3. #3
    Senior Member fin's Avatar
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    Oct 2007
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    I went with the rope suspension on mine, because I figured it would be more flexible. If I want to switch to webbing, all I have to do is add either a cinch buckle or rings by tying them to the existing rope (without cutting the rope shorter!) It's harder (but not by much) to add rope to a short tie-off than it is to tie a cinch buckle to a long rope if you end up wanting to switch. This way, you can test out both systems and see which works better for you, and if you like one over the other, no harm-no foul.

    Also, I plan to add the mini-hitchcraft rope ties to my rope/tree strap system, thereby making it infinitely more easy to adjust.

  4. #4
    New Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Louisville, KY
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    Thanks for the replies guys. My knowledge continues to climb on this site. I am excited that I will likely improve the least enjoyable part of my wilderness experiences.

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