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  1. #1
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    How big should I make my pad?

    So I've got a Walmart blue pad that I want to use as a sit pad and as an assist to my WB Winter Yeti. Since the Yeti is a 3/4 UQ, how small do you think I could cut down the pad for ease of packing without sacrificing the length for my legs? Do you guys think about 2" x 2.5" would be good or is that bigger then needed?

  2. #2
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    I think 2 inches x 2.5 inches will be a bit small.

  3. #3
    Senior Member bear bag hanger's Avatar
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    I'm guessing you meant 2' x 2.5' (2 ft x 2.5 ft). Sounds about right to me.

  4. #4
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    Yeah, It was late, I was rushing to pack for my trip today. Feet vs. inches, really only a minor detail right?? I ended up with about 20" x 24". Thanks for the replies though. Here's hoping I don't freeze Sunday night!

  5. #5
    The length kind of depends on what you are trying to keep warm. Wider shoulder areas (30+") will allow you to move around a little and not give yourself the cold shoulder. Length-wise, your kidneys are a large holder of blood and can chill your whole body if cold, that's why the make longer tails on many vests. CBS has been experienced by many here and it's wise to cover that. It seems that's where we compress our bags, extend into any air gap, etc. the most and are probably most apt to cool down due to lost insulation factors.
    Last edited by 4 dog knight; 11-18-2012 at 10:08. Reason: typo

  6. #6
    Senior Member Mustardman's Avatar
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    4_dog_knight - he's talking about using the foam as a leg pad, to cover the area that's not normally covered by the Warbonnet Yeti underquilt.

    As a fellow Yeti owner, I can assure you that cold shoulders are not an issue

    One thing to keep in mind with leg pads for the Yeti is that you're going to want at least a little overlap between the edge of the quilt and the pad, to keep you from getting cold right in that spot, and if you're using a top quilt instead of a sleeping bag, you might want to think about strategically placing the pad to avoid any major air gaps where the pad ends. I've used folded pads with my yeti so far, but am thinking about cutting down a piece of foam to be in the neighborhood of around 2.5 feet or so.

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