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  1. #1
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    REALLY basic newbie question re. ropes

    G'day all, just received my hammock in the mail today. It's a really basic unit but probably a little narrow in hindsight. (Finding the 'diagonal' is difficult).

    My question is, the rope I currently possess has too much stretch (I think it's nylon stuff). What ropes are user currently recommending? Size/type?

    Thanks,

    Shane

  2. #2
    Senior Member blackbishop351's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shane_v View Post
    G'day all, just received my hammock in the mail today. It's a really basic unit but probably a little narrow in hindsight. (Finding the 'diagonal' is difficult).

    My question is, the rope I currently possess has too much stretch (I think it's nylon stuff). What ropes are user currently recommending? Size/type?

    Thanks,

    Shane
    Welcome to the hanging crowd, and to the forum! We have at least two members from down under now

    Size isn't that important except for weight. Thicker stuff will be heavier of course. You do want something load rated to at least 800 lbs., preferably more like 1000 lbs. You can find low-stretch line too. Spectra or its alter ego Dyneema seem to be the choice for most folks. I've personally used this stuff from APS:

    http://www.apsltd.com/Tree/d261000/e258904.asp

    and it's worked well. Of course, I only use cord from my hammock to my buckles, then webbing to the trees. A longer length might have a little more stretch to it, but I don't think much more.
    "Physics is the only true science. All else is stamp collecting." - J. J. Thompson

  3. #3
    Peter_pan's Avatar
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    G'day and welcome...

    What kind of hammock did you get?

    Pan
    Ounces to Grams.

    www.jacksrbetter.com ... Largest supplier of camping quilts and under quilts...Home of the Original Nest Under Quilt, and Bear Mountain Bridge Hammock. 800 595 0413

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the info, clearly I had been barking up the wrong tree so to speak!

    I started looking at the 6 mm spectra but ended up opting for the 3mm. Stuff had something like 400 kg breaking strain and it's thin! I think I may have shaved a couple of kilos off my pack weight with new rope alone!

    I'll be seeking some webbing shortly since the 3mm seems to have a bit of stretch in it.

    The hammock was sold on ebay, it's a homemade thing by the look, a sheet of ripstop sewn over on itself with cord at either end. Looking at the cord there's a likelihood I might have to whip the ends before too long, but I hope not.

    I'm more of a "drive the ute somewhere, roll out the swag, light a fire" - type camper. Only just started looking into doing some hikes and actually CARRYING my food so this is all a bit new.

  5. #5
    titanium_hiker's Avatar
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    welcome!

    The mantra of this forum is "PICTURES!" it really helps to see where you're coming from.

    There is a stack of info about hiking on the web- yes a lot of it is US based, but it is adaptable to here- though one thing to remember is that water isn't as available as it seems to be along the AT- the all knowing "they" suggest carrying 2 litres of water... which means you have to get the weight down on the rest of your gear.

    titanium_hiker

    PS: Let me translate for you americans... ute = pick up truck, swag = traditional camping gear, akin to a sleeping bag + bivy.
    my hammock gear weights total: 2430g (~86oz)
    Winter: total 2521 (~89oz)
    (see my profile for detailed weights)

    gram counter, not gram weenie!

  6. #6
    slowhike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by titanium_hiker View Post
    welcome!

    The mantra of this forum is "PICTURES!" it really helps to see where you're coming from.

    There is a stack of info about hiking on the web- yes a lot of it is US based, but it is adaptable to here- though one thing to remember is that water isn't as available as it seems to be along the AT- the all knowing "they" suggest carrying 2 litres of water... which means you have to get the weight down on the rest of your gear.

    titanium_hiker

    PS: Let me translate for you americans... ute = pick up truck, swag = traditional camping gear, akin to a sleeping bag + bivy.
    thanks for the translation ti... i was wondering about those
    don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!

  7. #7
    Senior Member blackbishop351's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by titanium_hiker View Post
    PS: Let me translate for you americans... ute = pick up truck, swag = traditional camping gear, akin to a sleeping bag + bivy.
    Man....now we're gonna have to add ANOTHER glossary...
    "Physics is the only true science. All else is stamp collecting." - J. J. Thompson

  8. #8
    Senior Member Drop's Avatar
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    Shane made perfect sense to me*

    I went for 5mm cord, the weight seems OK and the stretch is minimal. The first chance I get to acquire some webbing I'm happy with I think I'll be heading down that route.

    Drop

    *well maybe weights and measures cause me trouble in general. I use stones for body weight, Kg for most others, metric for most measurements apart from distances when I go to miles... don't get me started on trying to convert material weights/strengths

  9. #9
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    I think it is cool to have you guys from other parts of the world here. Just goes to show, there are lots of trails in the world that I have yet to see. Plus I like to hear your guys' take on hammocking and gear.
    Is that too much to ask? Girls with frikkin' lasers on their heads?
    The hanger formly known as "hammock engineer".

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by titanium_hiker View Post
    welcome!

    The mantra of this forum is "PICTURES!" it really helps to see where you're coming from.

    There is a stack of info about hiking on the web- yes a lot of it is US based, but it is adaptable to here- though one thing to remember is that water isn't as available as it seems to be along the AT- the all knowing "they" suggest carrying 2 litres of water... which means you have to get the weight down on the rest of your gear.

    titanium_hiker

    PS: Let me translate for you americans... ute = pick up truck, swag = traditional camping gear, akin to a sleeping bag + bivy.
    Yep yep thanks for that, I figured three litres would get me into enough trouble. I normally carry 20 odd litres in the car, not gonna happen on a hike I'm afraid!!! My first trip is likely to be the 6 foot track in the blue mountains, only 50 kilometres (no I'm not going to convert it!!!), the tourists seem to be doing that in three days!!! They must be sitting around alot.

    Thanks also for the translations...sometimes I forget where my target audience is from!

    I'll do some pictures when I do the first shake-down trip. I'm lucky enough to have National Park across the road easy to bail out!

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