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  1. #21
    Senior Member Beast 71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Big Lake, MN
    Hammock
    WBBB 1.7 dbl.
    Tarp
    WBSuperfly w/doors
    Insulation
    JRB TQ&UQ quilts
    Posts
    1,360
    I've done DIY in order to get exactly what I want. If I can buy something off of the shelf that fits my needs I compare the price of materials to the finished product from the manufacturer, before I decide to DIY or not. My work is seasonal and money is tighter in the winter, but I have plenty of time then, so that also factors into whether I DIY or not. Usually, for me, DIYing is little or no cost savings.
    "In your face space coyote"-HJS

  2. #22
    Jimbo3b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    Posts
    70
    I decided to create my own hammocks so I could totally overbuild everything. I currently weigh 370 lbs, and for my recent bike trip, I wanted to be ready to hang from a wide variety of locations, so I built a suspension that would work for trees that were as much as 30' apart (meaning low angles on the suspension==>very high stress on the lines). So I went with a double-wall hammock, Amsteel 7/64 for the ridgeline, and doubled or tripled Amsteel up to the tree straps.

    I used mostly "seconds" fabric from DIY Gear Supply, and I've been very happy with the results. The occasional off-color thread or the messed-up camo print just add to the beauty of the final product in my opinion. I used aluminum nails (rain gutter nails) for tarp stakes, and I bought my cord by the spool. My webbing and carabiners were from other projects; I made some of my own hooks etc. out of aluminum left over from other projects, using drills, saws, and grinders from other projects. I'd say that up to this point, I haven't saved a dime, but I have a lot of fabric and cord left over for more projects.

    My immediate payoff was making stuff I couldn't easily buy. To do this, I spent lots of hours learning to sew again (hadn't done much in 15 years), learning to clean and oil the sewing machine, making a parabola for cat cuts on the tarps, muttering curses I don't want the kids (or even the pets) to hear when I had to rip out yards of a flat-felled seam that was also sewn into the middle of a tarp panel, learning to bury splices and make soft shackles, etc. If all this sounds like a good time, then DIY is for you.

  3. #23
    bundy71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Pennsville, NJ
    Hammock
    DIY Gathered
    Tarp
    WB Superfly
    Insulation
    DIY Sewn PLUQ
    Suspension
    DIY Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    285
    Quote Originally Posted by Hiknhanger View Post
    I enjoy showing off my homemade gear and having someone ask, "You made that?" It's pretty cool. I don't know how much I actually saved if any, but the pride the others have mentioned is worth it. No one has a hammock like mine!
    I agree with Hiknhanger. I know I can buy most things from the vendors, at a price equal or close to what it will cost me to DIY. I enjoy showing off custom work.
    Scout Master Troop 303, Carneys Point, NJ

  4. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Florence, SC
    Hammock
    Hennessy Exped Asym
    Tarp
    Hennessy hex fly
    Insulation
    Hammock Gear TQ/UQ
    Suspension
    Wingardium Leviosa
    Posts
    332
    Quote Originally Posted by firemedic View Post
    To me the DIY is about pride.
    Yep I made that!
    Just the other day I showed one of the guys at the Fire dept my bud light beer bottle stove
    Tonight he had this big ol grin on his face because he made one also.

    My stove is not pretty by no means
    But I am happy with it.
    I feel the same way. I saved about 20% on my underquilt vs buying and when people ask me where I got it I can say, "I made it". I would say DIY pays off if you are successful. But if you buy $100 worth of stuff and it doesn't work out, and you buy premade, then you're purchase cost $100 more than it should have.

    My neighbor's wife used to say when her husband started a home improvement project, it was going to cost twice what he thought it would, and require five trips to lowes.
    For more info, read:

    My personal blog

  5. #25
    darkbyrd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Pisgah Nat'l Forest, NC
    Hammock
    ENO DN/DIY1.1/TC
    Tarp
    Edge/Vertex
    Insulation
    OT down/DIY IXUQ
    Suspension
    whoopies
    Posts
    382
    Thanks for the insights. When it is time to pull the trigger, I may have decided what route I want to go. I was also going to make the IX quilt also described on the DIY gear supply site. Maybe I'll make some stuff, and buy some used. I have the time, but when the investment in materials is as much as buying it put together, the time might be better spent elsewhere. Besides, I don't even know what I want yet!

  6. #26
    DivaB's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Newark, OH
    Hammock
    DIY Extra Wide & Long Tablecloth
    Tarp
    Funky & GG Tarps
    Insulation
    DIY down UQ
    Suspension
    continuous L. Amst
    Posts
    4,102
    I do things in threes. Me, my son, and an extra for my husband, mom or one of Dakota's friends. DIY has saved me bundles! I have the time, so why not. It also gives me pride, but the $ I've saved has been well worth the frustration of learning a new skill and worth the time it takes to make. Only draw back is that I can't seem to stop, and it has created a very real problem in our home.

  7. #27
    hangNyak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    St. Petersburg, FL
    Hammock
    DIY
    Tarp
    Superfly
    Insulation
    HG down
    Suspension
    WB webbing
    Posts
    495
    Images
    17
    I agree with another poster about starting with a couple small projects. My first two projects were a ridgeline organizer and a stuff sack. From there I made a tarp. I was very pleased with how it turned out. Some things you make will cost almost as much as new. I just got my materials for making a new hammock with an integrated bugnet yesterday. Total cost was $52. To buy a hammock like I will be making would cost between $150-$200. The cost difference will pay off on this project and it will be exactly how I want it. That being said, I bought a Hammock Gear Phoenix a few months back. I couldn't come close to the quality craftsmanship of that piece of gear. I love it! It just depends on what you want to do. Don't be afraid of the DIY route, though. In the end, it's worth it to use a piece of gear you made yourself.
    RON

    A tree's a tree. How many more do you need to look at? ~ Ronald Reagan

  8. #28
    Senior Member ibgary's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    Hammock
    Dangerbird, (custom) thanks Papa
    Tarp
    10x10 DIY
    Insulation
    DIY insultex.
    Suspension
    Woopie, UCR
    Posts
    467
    Quote Originally Posted by ibgary View Post
    Well said. That's how I feel about my diy tarp. It ain't pretty, but it works, & I made it. I'll let you know how I feel about the insultex uq after I test it for fit and warmth. Scott's design is straight forward and doesn't cost much at all.
    Ok, the insultex uq is done, and its warm. I think the next project will be converting my sleeping bag into a top quilt.

  9. #29
    Needs more Hang time Catavarie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Hammock
    LeanGreen/BigRed/DIY
    Tarp
    CatCut Hex/GG12
    Insulation
    Fur I grow myself
    Suspension
    Of Disbelief
    Posts
    3,519
    Images
    3
    I started with DIY because I couldn't afford $50+ for a basic hammock, but I could afford $25 for the material to make one. Since then I've made my own tarp and quilts and a few other odds and ends. DIY may not be cheaper al teh time, but I can buy materials as the funds are available and stockpile until I have everything I need for a project. I've never been great at saving and budgeting cash. and having myself a $150 biweekly allowance for food/gas/incidentals means I don't have much left over for gear purchases. And it would take me several years to save up enough to buy a premade down quilt from one of our cottage vendors. But by finding a great deal on a down pillow and purchasing ripstop on sale I was able to put my quilts together in only a few months.

    DIY can be cheaper, but you have to be a bit creative at times sourcing material.
    *Heaven best have trees, because I plan to lounge for eternity.

    Good judgement is the result of experience and experience the result of bad judgement. - Mark Twain

    Trail name: Radar

    2014 Smoked Butt Hang Planning Thread | Sign up Sheet

  10. #30
    MAD777's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    South Florida
    Hammock
    DIY, WBBB & Switchback
    Tarp
    HG cuben,OES Spinn
    Insulation
    DIY down 3/4 UQ/TQ
    Suspension
    Dynaglide & Dutch
    Posts
    8,571
    Images
    39
    I like to make gear for the fun of it. Sometimes I save a little bit of money, sometimes I don't. I know what I can do and I buy what I can't (always from cottage vendors).
    Mike
    "Life is a Project!"

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