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  1. #471
    New Member Woody's Avatar
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    I apologize if someone already brought this up, but can you use just a standard hot water bottle like this one?

    http://www.amazon.com/Mabis-Healthca...t+water+bottle

    I'd imagine it may hold heats bit better then the Nalgene?
    "If you think the economy is more important than the environment, try holding your breath while counting your money."

  2. #472
    grannypat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody View Post
    I apologize if someone already brought this up, but can you use just a standard hot water bottle like this one?

    http://www.amazon.com/Mabis-Healthca...t+water+bottle

    I'd imagine it may hold heats bit better then the Nalgene?


    You could, but it really only has a single use, is heavy and requires you to heat a lot of water. A 16 oz. nalgene only weighs 3 oz. and the 32 oz is 6 oz and you can drink from them too.
    Keep movin', keep believing and enjoy the journey!

  3. #473
    Senior Member Mouseskowitz's Avatar
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    One of these days I need to try this. The thing is that I'm usually warm for the first couple of hours of a cold weather hang. Once I'm done wrestling my bag around to get situated (yes I know I should get a nice TQ but I'm a poor grad student) I'm practically sweating. So, if I'm pretty warm in the beginning would adding a hot water bottle cause me to sweat and ultimately be colder later on? Also, do the effects of the hot water last till the 5-6 hour point when I need them more?

  4. #474
    grannypat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mouseskowitz View Post
    One of these days I need to try this. The thing is that I'm usually warm for the first couple of hours of a cold weather hang. Once I'm done wrestling my bag around to get situated (yes I know I should get a nice TQ but I'm a poor grad student) I'm practically sweating. So, if I'm pretty warm in the beginning would adding a hot water bottle cause me to sweat and ultimately be colder later on? Also, do the effects of the hot water last till the 5-6 hour point when I need them more?
    I put my naglene in a fleece bag or a clean sock to help retain the heat. It is usually still warm in the morning.
    Keep movin', keep believing and enjoy the journey!

  5. #475
    New Member Manbert's Avatar
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    Great tip. I've had a few nights in the BWCA that would have been miserable if it weren't for the nalgene of just-boiled water to snuggle with. I am amazed at how warm they stay through sunrise.

  6. #476
    goanywhere's Avatar
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    Hello all. I'm a noob on this forum, but as an experienced camper/hiker, let me offer my method of using a hot water bottle in a sleeping bag. (I didn't read the whole thread, so these tips might have come up in previous posts).

    1. Use a stainless steel bottle (about 750ml is best). That way you can still use the water later for drinking/cooking. In a plastic or rubber hot water bottle the water can taint, and you shouldn't really drink it. Also, plastic bottles weaken or warp if boiling water is used (even nalgene), so you limit the risk of leaks and scalds.

    2. Wrap the bottle in a thick sock. This will insulate it enough to allow direct contact with feet, legs etc. without causing burns. As a side benefit, if your socks are slightly damp they will dry really quickly. (If you want to dry 2 socks, use 2 bottles, and you'll be very warm!)

    3. If you are facing extreme cold, and need to heat up the bottle in the middle of the night you can, over a low gas flame, or even better, if you have the space and are prepared to carry the weight, you can use a vacuum flask as a back up. You fill the bottle with boiling water, and fill the vacuum flask as well. Then in the middle of the night, if you really need to renew the hot water bottle, you can empty the first bottle, refill with the water from the vacuum flask, which will still be very hot, then it will get you through the night no problem.

    This works for me, and I've never had to suffer a shivvering cold night camping since.

    Just my 2c worth.

  7. #477
    Senior Member Pipsissewa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goanywhere View Post
    ...if you have the space and are prepared to carry the weight, you can use a vacuum flask as a back up. You fill the bottle with boiling water, and fill the vacuum flask as well. Then in the middle of the night, if you really need to renew the hot water bottle, you can empty the first bottle, refill with the water from the vacuum flask, which will still be very hot, then it will get you through the night no problem. ...
    Ahhh.....! "Vacuum flask" = "Thermos". Got it! It took me a minute!
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  8. #478
    goanywhere's Avatar
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    Re: Using A Hot Water Bottle To Stay Warm

    Yep that's it. I actually use a Stanley, but same thing.

  9. #479
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    Quote Originally Posted by goanywhere View Post
    Hello all. I'm a noob on this forum, but as an experienced camper/hiker, let me offer my method of using a hot water bottle in a sleeping bag. (I didn't read the whole thread, so these tips might have come up in previous posts).

    1. Use a stainless steel bottle (about 750ml is best). That way you can still use the water later for drinking/cooking. In a plastic or rubber hot water bottle the water can taint, and you shouldn't really drink it. Also, plastic bottles weaken or warp if boiling water is used (even nalgene), so you limit the risk of scalds




    Just my 2c worth.
    Definitely have to agree on the stainless bottles. Switched from nalgenes to the 40oz Klean kanteens a couple years ago. A big plus to this is if your water filter or stove go south, you can boil in them over a fire. I do it occasionally to save fuel also and they have held up just fine.
    Just don't try it with an insulated or thermos type as it can burst.
    Only downside with these vs. nalgene bottle is if it unwraps or comes out of the sock in your bag and touches bare skin you'll regret it FAST! (The plastic of the nalgene won't burn you nearly as quickly.). The stainless bottles seem to dent far easier than a nalgene will break, but its usually only cosmetic.
    I will say that I've got a couple nalgenes that are probably more than 10 years old, have been filled with boiling water probably at least a hundred times each, and never noticed any issue with warping or distortion at all. I have occasionally replaced a lid, but not due to the effects of boiling water as far as I know.

  10. #480
    Indy138's Avatar
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    I use the steel clean canteen bottles for the dual purpose drinking/ boiling water use as well. In winter time I use a boot liner to stuff the hot bottle into a little before bed to warm up the hammock. then I keep the bottle between my thighs, which seems to work good for me. I have thinsulate boot liners from the army surplus which hold the heat amazingly. By morning my water is still warm.

    I just learned about this trick last winter and It works great for me.

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