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  1. #1
    Senior Member Lupus's Avatar
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    Potential Backpacking Hammock Stand

    Ok, I've been looking for a way to put up a hammock when there are no trees around for a while.

    I've seen the Turtle Lady Stand, great and easy to build.
    The 'improved' version, the Turtle Dog stand, also great and easy to build.

    There is only one problem I've had with these. They don't seem 'portable' enough for me. I drive a Honda Civic. I don't have room to pack 3 6' long poles into my car when I go camping. So I've kept searching.

    Today I found this on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2W-Y...eature=related

    WOW! Looks like maybe 3' or 4' dowels staked out.

    I'm thinking about using Amsteel Blue instead of wire cable, with splices and a bowlin or figure 8 on a bite or a double locking splice instead of all the hardware. I'm sure that would be a good substitute for the line, I'm just trying to figure out a lighter alternative to hauling around 4 10" steel lag bolts that would still hold.

    Anyone have some ideas?

  2. #2
    Wanderlust78's Avatar
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    That seems like an awesome idea. A lot more portable than the TurtleDog stand.

    I would think about taller dowels though if you need to hang a tarp...maybe stretch them up to 5'

    You may want to check this one out too. He has it set up to break down to smaller sections. Seems a bit more solid.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=paJipIw5E_c
    Last edited by Wanderlust78; 11-21-2012 at 18:37.
    - Beaker

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Lupus's Avatar
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    I was thinking about that to. Depending on how low the hammock hung on the test hang for me, and how low I could hang the hammock on the Dowels.

    I did find these I may try as the stakes: http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___28799#

    Total weight for the 4 I would need would be 2.48 oz's. I would guess that's a lot lighter than 4 10" lag bolts. I may try some MSR Groundhog's too and see if they'll hold.

    I was also considering experimenting using Trekking poles, instead of dowels, if I could find some cheap enough to risk breaking them in the test.

    I've seen that one (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=paJipIw5E_c). I was very concerned with how the poles bowed when he laid in his hammock.

  4. #4
    Wanderlust78's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lupus View Post
    I was also considering experimenting using Trekking poles, instead of dowels, if I could find some cheap enough to risk breaking them in the test.

    I've seen that one (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=paJipIw5E_c). I was very concerned with how the poles bowed when he laid in his hammock.

    I wouldn't think anything but really strong (read: expensive) trekking poles would be able to take that kind of weight and force. And the expensive ones you wouldn't want to risk it with anyway.
    - Beaker

    Not all who wander are lost - J.R.R. Tolkein

    Besides, if we get lost, we just pull in somewheres and ask directions - Captain Ron

  5. #5
    This is bery similar to Alamosa's stand. Alo used 5-6 foot nesting pipes along with stronger stakes. But then his is taller and supports the tarp as well.
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  6. #6
    old4hats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lupus View Post
    Ok, I've been looking for a way to put up a hammock when there are no trees around for a while.

    I've seen the Turtle Lady Stand, great and easy to build.
    The 'improved' version, the Turtle Dog stand, also great and easy to build.

    There is only one problem I've had with these. They don't seem 'portable' enough for me. I drive a Honda Civic. I don't have room to pack 3 6' long poles into my car when I go camping. So I've kept searching.

    Today I found this on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2W-Y...eature=related

    WOW! Looks like maybe 3' or 4' dowels staked out.

    I'm thinking about using Amsteel Blue instead of wire cable, with splices and a bowlin or figure 8 on a bite or a double locking splice instead of all the hardware. I'm sure that would be a good substitute for the line, I'm just trying to figure out a lighter alternative to hauling around 4 10" steel lag bolts that would still hold.

    Anyone have some ideas?

    For this setup, 4 pieces of amsteel with a loop spliced into each end, with locked brummels, would probably work better than his cable rig. The point of potential failure looks to be the stakes holding the lines. His lag bolts have the threads to help resist pull out, smooth stakes might not work nearly as well. Check the alamosa stand out and you might pick up some interesting information, might be the difference in falling or not.

  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=old4hats;864250...Check the alamosa stand out and you might pick up some interesting information, might be the difference in falling or not.[/QUOTE]

    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ad.php?t=34776

  8. #8
    Senior Member Lupus's Avatar
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    Using the Hammock Hang Calculator: http://theultimatehang.com/hammock-hang-calculator.html

    If I make the sag 30* on my Eno Double Nest, which is 112" long, if I space the poles about 9' 4", then I can use 36" tall poles and still have my hammock 4" off the ground. Using 48" tall poles would allow for a low tarp and perhaps a little more ground clearance.

    If I use poles that break down, I could have 4 2' poles, which could nest the 'boom stakes' and strap nicely together for something easily transportable. Hmm. . . wonder how light I could make the whole rig.

    I've looked at Alamosa's design, and I like it. I love the Boom Stake's (reminds me of a movie I saw once. "This is my Boom Stick!" er Stake )

  9. #9
    breyman's Avatar
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    If you're looking for a backpacking setup (ie carry it multiple miles into the backcountry), the Alamosa stand that's been discussed already is one of the more reasonable options.

    If you're looking for a sedan-portable stand for car camping use, though, I'd recommend the Turtle Lady stand, with materials that collapse down. It was a bit tough in your title/initial post to determine exactly which one you are looking for. I was in a similar position - needing a stand to bring to scout outings or other campgrounds that didn't have sufficient trees but that were fairly car accessible so weight wasn't as much an issue as getting something into my sedan.

    As far as I can tell, gmcttr was the first to construct a TurtleLady stand out of a set of 4' aluminum poles that all break down easily and store in a bag, as outlined on this page:
    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...&postcount=613

    He links to the site where he found them - they're military poles that hold up camouflage netting. The catch? Shipping's rough on 30 pounds of poles. I was able to do some searching on Craigslist, though, and found someone selling the exact same poles (they are old military issue, so they are around in a number of places) within an hour drive of my house and picked up enough for 3 sets for a very reasonable cost. I then built them pretty much exactly as gmcttr did (with lashings, some Grainger push buttons to hold the poles together, etc.) and they work great.

    The best part is that they load into a very nice bag and fit into the trunk or back seat of my Toyota Camry. They're heavy-ish; I wouldn't want to load them on my back and walk too far. But, they're easily portable for car camping or short walks to set up. Depending on your exact needs, they're definitely worth considering as they don't need stakes and their setup is a bit more straightforward.

    And if you're interested in a double stand - check out the MustardDog stand built out of the same poles!
    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ad.php?t=60638
    Brian
    Denver, CO
    Father. Husband. Scoutmaster.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Lupus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by breyman View Post
    If you're looking for a backpacking setup (ie carry it multiple miles into the backcountry), the Alamosa stand that's been discussed already is one of the more reasonable options.

    If you're looking for a sedan-portable stand for car camping use, though, I'd recommend the Turtle Lady stand, with materials that collapse down. It was a bit tough in your title/initial post to determine exactly which one you are looking for. I was in a similar position - needing a stand to bring to scout outings or other campgrounds that didn't have sufficient trees but that were fairly car accessible so weight wasn't as much an issue as getting something into my sedan.

    As far as I can tell, gmcttr was the first to construct a TurtleLady stand out of a set of 4' aluminum poles that all break down easily and store in a bag, as outlined on this page:
    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...&postcount=613

    He links to the site where he found them - they're military poles that hold up camouflage netting. The catch? Shipping's rough on 30 pounds of poles. I was able to do some searching on Craigslist, though, and found someone selling the exact same poles (they are old military issue, so they are around in a number of places) within an hour drive of my house and picked up enough for 3 sets for a very reasonable cost. I then built them pretty much exactly as gmcttr did (with lashings, some Grainger push buttons to hold the poles together, etc.) and they work great.

    The best part is that they load into a very nice bag and fit into the trunk or back seat of my Toyota Camry. They're heavy-ish; I wouldn't want to load them on my back and walk too far. But, they're easily portable for car camping or short walks to set up. Depending on your exact needs, they're definitely worth considering as they don't need stakes and their setup is a bit more straightforward.

    And if you're interested in a double stand - check out the MustardDog stand built out of the same poles!
    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...ad.php?t=60638
    Originally I was looking for a Turtlelady that would break down and fit easily within my civic, for Scouting events that I go to.

    However, over this winter, my desire to get into lightweight backpacking has increased and I've begun considering a setup that might fit more ideally within that setting.

    Cost is also a factor for me, as the wife is going to grad school and we are paying for that out of pocket, excess money to spend is in short supply. 2 4' dowel rods, 40' of amsteel blue (20' for each side), and some 10" tent pegs are fairly cheap. Probably no more than about $20-$30.

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