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  1. #1
    Member Chethro's Avatar
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    Ring support question

    Do you match the ring inner diameter to the webbing size (ie 1" web to 1" ring)? What size do you use? I was thinking of using 1" nylon web with 1 1/2" rings. Do you think this will be OK? My hammock is a Claytor jungle hammock.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cannibal's Avatar
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    I used 1.5" ID rings with 1" webbing. Not for any real reason other than that's what REI had when I was in there.

    Use polyester, NOT NYLON webbing. The nylon stretches, the poly not so much.
    Last edited by Cannibal; 12-08-2008 at 20:00. Reason: Answered the second question

  3. #3
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    Yep, I believe most people are using a larger ring ID than the webbing. The webbing & rings you mentioned sound right to me.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member angrysparrow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannibal View Post
    Use polyester, NOT NYLON webbing. The nylon stretches, the poly not so much.
    I'll second that wisdom. Either polypro or polyester will serve you better than nylon.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Just Jeff's Avatar
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    This may be conjecture and hopefully someone smarter than me can confirm or deny it, but it's the logic I go with for my rings.

    I think you want a little bigger ring than the width of the webbing b/c you're putting so much force on it. If you used 1" webbing in a ring w/ 1" diameter, most of the force on the webbing would be on the edges b/c of how it would "curl" around the inside of the rings...it's better to disperse the force by limiting the amount the webbing "curls."

    Any climbing experts (or anyone else with working knowledge of webbing) agree or disagree with that?
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  6. #6
    Member Chethro's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info! What size rope do you recommend for the hammock side of the rings?
    What type of rope do you use, nylon or polyester?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Jeff View Post
    This may be conjecture and hopefully someone smarter than me can confirm or deny it, but it's the logic I go with for my rings.

    I think you want a little bigger ring than the width of the webbing b/c you're putting so much force on it. If you used 1" webbing in a ring w/ 1" diameter, most of the force on the webbing would be on the edges b/c of how it would "curl" around the inside of the rings...it's better to disperse the force by limiting the amount the webbing "curls."

    Any climbing experts (or anyone else with working knowledge of webbing) agree or disagree with that?

    Not a climber but an engineer at one time... Jeff - you are right. What you want to do is get as much surface area as possible under load so the friction will do its job. The flatter the load bearing surface, the better. Therefore, the larger the ID (up to a point), the better the hold. Of course, to get a really large ID, the rings get bigger in both absolute size and in cross-section. Eventually you can't keep everything lined up well enough to hold securely. There is a trick to getting basically an infinite ID with very little size or weight penalty. It's called a cinch buckle .

    Bottom line - for ring buckles, use rings that are a little larger than the width of the webbing used to distribute forces and friction over a good surface area, just like JustJeff said.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by JayS View Post
    There is a trick to getting basically an infinite ID with very little size or weight penalty. It's called a cinch buckle .
    And I will add that not all cinch buckles work the same way when you look at the details. All provide pressure over a contact area, but one style is to add a biting, or cutting type force to that while another style is to add more friction and over a larger area. This is an example of the first style and this is an example of the latter style.

    If they are strong enough and do fail, at first glance I would think a failure with the first style would involve the webbing breaking from the biting/cutting pressure while under load and a failure of the second style would involve the webbing slipping through. I like the looks of the latter myself but don't really know which is best, if one is better it might be a function of the webbing that is used.
    Last edited by Youngblood; 12-09-2008 at 09:42.
    Youngblood AT2000

  9. #9
    if you use a d-ring, you can run the webbing over the flat part so there will be no curl while still allowing you to use a smaller 1" ring and save a little weight. lots of welded steel d-rings out there, some lighter than others.

  10. #10
    Senior Member cavscout's Avatar
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    I'm using Sling Rings that have an ID of 2" with 1" polyPro webbing. No problems.

    Here's some discussion on them

    http://www.hammockforums.net/forum/s...8&postcount=23

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