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  1. #61
    MrToot's Avatar
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    Apr 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by dejoha View Post
    I've got a cuben tarp as well and they do not stuff well. You can still use a double-sided stuff sack, but the process is different. Maybe not as fast, just different.

    I follow the these steps for folding a tarp in the field:

    1. Leave the tarp attached to one side (the side with the stuff sack). This gives you a "second hand" to hold the tarp as you work the other end.

    2. Holding the loose end, grab the center of the tarp and fold it in half along the ridge line.

    3. Continue folding the tarp along the ridge line until you are left with the fabric at the width of the stuff sack.

    4. Roll the the tarp up toward the stuff sack and stuff.

    I hope this helps!
    Thank you very much

  2. #62
    MotoBoss's Avatar
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    Jul 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by zenmystic View Post
    Love this set up.... where can you can get the small double ended stuff sacks for the tarp?
    Got two small's from JRB for my WBBB and WB Travler. They measure up about the same as the orginial's.
    ~Adventure Before Dementia~

  3. #63
    mrcheviot's Avatar
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    nacrawhoopie
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    On your webpage when talking about a loop instead of a key ring you mention that the important thing is to get the Flyz as close to the tarp as possible. Why? I understand that sag increases as the attachment point moves further away from the tarp, but with 3:1 leverage to tension the tarp I think it's pretty minimal. Also, sag is something that users of two lines have always dealt with, and it's a non issue if the RL is under the tarp.

    Basically just checking to see if I've missed another aspect of this. Was thinking about how to deal w/ skins should I continue using them, and adding D-Ring extenders to attach the Flyz and loop to seemed like an easy solution to provide space needed to bunch them off past the ends of the tarp.

    Great work, thanks.

    It is a very alert, active sheep, with a stylish, lively carriage.

    I tour & bike camp with a Mark Nobilette built Protovelo, and ride a bunch of others. Have any bike questions?

    Camping pics on Flickr

  4. #64
    dejoha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcheviot View Post
    On your webpage when talking about a loop instead of a key ring you mention that the important thing is to get the Flyz as close to the tarp as possible. Why? I understand that sag increases as the attachment point moves further away from the tarp, but with 3:1 leverage to tension the tarp I think it's pretty minimal. Also, sag is something that users of two lines have always dealt with, and it's a non issue if the RL is under the tarp.

    Basically just checking to see if I've missed another aspect of this. Was thinking about how to deal w/ skins should I continue using them, and adding D-Ring extenders to attach the Flyz and loop to seemed like an easy solution to provide space needed to bunch them off past the ends of the tarp.

    Great work, thanks.
    Thanks Mr Cheviot!

    There are a few reasons I like having the attachment point as close to the tarp as possible.

    1. On average, tarps have a ridge line length of around 11 ft. At the minimum-recommended distance of 12 feet, that only gives you inches of wiggle room on each side of the tarp. When knots, prusiks, and hardware get wrapped around the anchor point (tree), they become difficult to adjust. Having the "action" right near the tarp, keeps it easier to manipulate.

    2. I like to create a "V" with the tarp tie-outs so the hammock suspension doesn't interfere with the tarp. Having the vertex of the "V" as close to the tarp minimizes the interaction between tarp and hammock suspension. I like to split the "V" right at the tarp, especially with longer hangs when the hammock suspension is higher than the tarp suspension.

    3. Keeping the hardware connected to the tarp helps make it easier to find and use. With some methods that put all the hardware on the line (particularly prusik knots), it takes some time to find them and adjust them before they are usable. This isn't the top reason, but it's one of those little tips that helps me pitch more efficiently and faster.

    On a side note, I don't recommend putting the continuous ridge line under a tarp much any more. After some miserable experiences, I've realized that the line _under_ the tarp acts as a very efficient water seep, allowing water to run down and under the tarp. Drip lines become ineffective on a tarp because you end up dripping the water on the hammock. End tie-outs and ridge lines _above_ the tarp do not have this unfortunate side-effect.

    For storm worthiness, a tarp pitched with steep sides is more than effective at shedding snow. Steep sides is also great to avoid water pooling on a tarp during a deluge. Properly pitched with a ridge line running on top, a tarp will be strong enough to weather the storms.

  5. #65
    New Member Lastczarnian's Avatar
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    This will cut my tarp ridgeline setup time in half. Where can I get some of those mini biners?

  6. #66
    mrcheviot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dejoha View Post
    Thanks Mr Cheviot!

    There are a few reasons I like having the attachment point as close to the tarp as possible.

    1. On average, tarps have a ridge line length of around 11 ft. At the minimum-recommended distance of 12 feet, that only gives you inches of wiggle room on each side of the tarp. When knots, prusiks, and hardware get wrapped around the anchor point (tree), they become difficult to adjust. Having the "action" right near the tarp, keeps it easier to manipulate.
    This makes sense, and I agree that for short spans having extra stuff at the tarp attachment points can be an issue. My idea was simply to add 8" D-Ring extenders (so a D-Ring on some grosgrain or cord with a loop on the end, lark's headed to tarp D-Ring) in order to provide space for skins to be bunched up onto. It would add 16" to the tarp ridge length, but in a pinch for a short span the original D-Rings at the tarp could still be used.

    Quote Originally Posted by dejoha View Post
    On a side note, I don't recommend putting the continuous ridge line under a tarp much any more. After some miserable experiences, I've realized that the line _under_ the tarp acts as a very efficient water seep, allowing water to run down and under the tarp. Drip lines become ineffective on a tarp because you end up dripping the water on the hammock. End tie-outs and ridge lines _above_ the tarp do not have this unfortunate side-effect.
    I agree 100%. I find most tarps pitch better w/ the ridge line over the tarp, and for an under the tarp line (i.e. clothes line to dry things out or attach a light) I just use some zing-it with a small whoopie sling at the end for adjustability, attached to the D-rings via S-biners. These act as an adequate rain break in my experience.

    One last question (or tip?) - I was experimenting with this setup yesterday and found it a bit frustrating that when I had to let go of the Flyz end of the tarp to get the line around the tree, the tarp just slid back down the ridgeline out of reach (so in your video it's the left side). I found that by clipping the antenna of the Flyz on the line and giving it a tug it would stay in place long enough for me to deal w/ the line around the tree, and after watching your video it looks like you attempt to do the same (although it does slip slightly). Perhaps just an unmentioned trick, or do you have an alternate tip?

    Thanks again.

    It is a very alert, active sheep, with a stylish, lively carriage.

    I tour & bike camp with a Mark Nobilette built Protovelo, and ride a bunch of others. Have any bike questions?

    Camping pics on Flickr

  7. #67
    dejoha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcheviot View Post
    One last question (or tip?) - I was experimenting with this setup yesterday and found it a bit frustrating that when I had to let go of the Flyz end of the tarp to get the line around the tree, the tarp just slid back down the ridgeline out of reach (so in your video it's the left side). I found that by clipping the antenna of the Flyz on the line and giving it a tug it would stay in place long enough for me to deal w/ the line around the tree, and after watching your video it looks like you attempt to do the same (although it does slip slightly). Perhaps just an unmentioned trick, or do you have an alternate tip?
    Actually, that's exactly what I do. Once I've "slid" or adjusted the tarp to center it, I hook the "antenna," wrap the line around my anchor point/tree, and then do the final adjustment with the TarpFlyz stinger.

  8. #68
    doogie's Avatar
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    May 2012
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    Here is my quick video on using this method.

    Mountains should be climbed with as little effort as possible and without desire. ... To live only for some future goal is shallow. Itís the sides of the mountain that sustain life, not the top. Here's where things grow.

    Robert M. Pirsig

    Subscribe to my YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/PaCampingDad

  9. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by JaxHiker View Post
    I'll have to try putting the flyz at the tarp. I'm trying to figure out how easily adjustable it is that way.
    I agree, That's probably way easier than having them on the ridge line.

    I have 2 Tarpflyz on my ridge line and I'm using one of them as a simple hook. If I just move my 2nd tarpflyz off of the ridge line and onto the tarp I'd have this setup.

  10. #70
    Senior Member Steve D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alpineLounger View Post
    I'm glad it's not just my wife... I try to explain the lure of Dutchware but she just rolls her eyes.
    The word 'Dutchware' in the hammock world gets the same reaction at titanium in the bicycle world.

    Saw the video last week but didn't stumble onto this thread until today. No matter, I just ordered the same set-up with a Stinger instead of Flyz.

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