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  1. #71
    Member snare's Avatar
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    Aug 2012
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    Pisgah
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    DIY Marpat w/ quad Knotties
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    Etowah
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    Thanks for this Derek !

    I just switched over to this method. Light, compact, quick and easy
    "The essential psychological requirement of a free society is the willingness on the part of the individual to accept responsibility for his life." ~ Edith Packer

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  2. #72

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Colfax, Ca
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    DIY gathered end hammock
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    Straps & whoopie
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    I tried this system last night and it was quick and easy to set up. It was much easier to adjust than sliding a tarpFlyz along the line and then adjusting the prussics and toggles.

    I like it.

    BTW, I almost never visit this particular sub forum. I mean, I have my suspension already, what could be new or interesting? Well, I'm glad I checked it out because this just made my setup vastly easier.
    Last edited by GregB; 06-20-2013 at 08:47.

  3. #73
    dejoha's Avatar
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    Jun 2009
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    Flagstaff, AZ
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    GoLite Poncho Tarp
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregB View Post
    I tried this system last night and it was quick and easy to set up. It was much easier to adjust than sliding a tarpFlyz along the line and then adjusting the prussics and toggles.

    I like it.

    BTW, I almost never visit this particular sub forum. I mean, I have my suspension already, what could be new or interesting? Well, I'm glad I checked it out because this just made my setup vastly easier.
    Thanks Greg!

    Now, if you're really curious, i've got a few other tips on my blog that I post now and again. I'm glad this one worked out for you!

  4. #74
    firemedic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Rosinville, SC
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    WBBB 1.7 Double
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    Mamajamba
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    AHE New River
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    Whoopie Slings
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    362
    Wow that is quick and simple, I already use the 1.75 Dyneema for my ridgeline, so all i have to do is add some Dutchware.

    Now i am no longer a dutchware virgin, as I just placed my order. I also d/l'ed your book from Itunes, so i can read it on my iPad.


    Thanks for the useful information.

  5. #75

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    NC
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    WBBB XLC 1.7d
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    HG WinterPalace
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    straps whoopie
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    198
    nice set up. Has there been anything better come along in the last couple of years?

  6. #76
    mrcheviot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    white plains, ny
    Hammock
    wb xlc
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    waterproof
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    nacrawhoopie
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    187
    Just a update to this method, I was initially jammed up with how best to deal with tarp skins since I was worried about having enough space between the tie out points to accommodate the bunched up skins, and I thought it would be too difficult to slide the tarp with the ridgeline in the skins. Watching doogie's video however inspired me to give it a try.

    Happy to report it works great with the RL above the tarp but in the skins, so the skins get pushed past the tie out points onto the V a little bit once setup. As long as you make sure you're not rolling the tarp onto the line when pulling the skins back over it will slide easily when you're setting it up. I do find it's easier to position the tarp before I have the Dutch fly cinched (also think it's easier on the tree bark), but this method is dead simple and super fast to deploy.

    It is a very alert, active sheep, with a stylish, lively carriage.

    I tour & bike camp with a Mark Nobilette built Protovelo, and ride a bunch of others. Have any bike questions?

    Camping pics on Flickr

  7. #77
    Member Madman4049's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Shreveport LA
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    HH Expedition ASYM ZIP
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    Thanks for posting this, I have a camo Superfly on the way and ordered the stuff from Dutch to do this setup. Of all the continuous ridgeline setups I have considered this one is the winner for me.

  8. #78
    designer@quickdata.com's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    Bend, OR
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    A couple of other reasons for the Ridge Line above the tarp would be
    1) Some tarps have a catenary cut on their ridge and I'd think an "under" suspension would pull it down rather than allowing it to form its desired curve.

    2) In good weather the above ridge line can act as a clothes line for light weight gear (socks, tee shirts, etc.) and any drip would fall on the tarp, not on the hammock.

    2.5) if you use reflective cord for your ridge line you can actually see it rather than have it hide under the tarp.

    In my experience I found the holes in the Dutchware to be a bit too small for the split rings I was using so switched to Figure-9's. My setup is heavier because I use 3mm cord, a mini biner, and the figure-9 but rigging is the same.

    It is a little off to say you are "sliding" the tarp because what is sliding is the line. And as someone said, that can leave a visible mark on the tree. In my case, in the GREAT NW, a bigger concern is all the thick rough bark grabbing and catching that line. So I figured the 3mm cord wouldn't catch/snag/scar as much at 1.75mm Lash-It.

    Now maybe this is just silly but I could swear I read somewhere it was a finesse to go around the trees on alternating sides. In other words, opposite of what the graphic shows. In the current graphic both hook ends of the line are on the same side of both trees. Now it seems to me that once you create the V-loop, it don't make no never mind if the line goes clockwise or counter clockwise and opposite-wise on the other end. if there is something to that technique, other than the ramblings of the heavily medicated, please let me know.

    Thank you all for the posts and ideas.

  9. #79
    Member
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    Sep 2013
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    ON, CA
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    54
    Good info.

  10. #80
    dejoha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by designer@quickdata.com View Post
    It is a little off to say you are "sliding" the tarp because what is sliding is the line. And as someone said, that can leave a visible mark on the tree. In my case, in the GREAT NW, a bigger concern is all the thick rough bark grabbing and catching that line. So I figured the 3mm cord wouldn't catch/snag/scar as much at 1.75mm Lash-It.

    Now maybe this is just silly but I could swear I read somewhere it was a finesse to go around the trees on alternating sides. In other words, opposite of what the graphic shows. In the current graphic both hook ends of the line are on the same side of both trees. Now it seems to me that once you create the V-loop, it don't make no never mind if the line goes clockwise or counter clockwise and opposite-wise on the other end. if there is something to that technique, other than the ramblings of the heavily medicated, please let me know.
    Great thoughts! With the tarp connected to the continuous ridge line they become, in essence, a single unit. That is why I referred to the process as "sliding the tarp" because that is the effect. It might be more accurate to say I'm sliding the tarp and line together. To minimize any potential "sawing" effect on the tree with the line, I recommend keeping the line loose enough that it slides easily. I also use the sheathing from about 2 ft of 550 cord that I feed my continuous line through. This is placed around the tree to protect the bark. It is a very lightweight solution. In places where damage is more of a concern (high-use areas/campgrounds) I would recommend using a tree strap for the tarp AND the hammock.

    The other technique you mention where you position the tarp line on one side of the tree and the hammock anchor on the other side is an alternate method for keeping those two lines from colliding. The big trade-off with that method is that you are also moving the hammock and the tarp away from each other. Depending on what style of tarp you use, this could significantly expose the hammock outside the coverage area of the tarp, so it is something to consider. This is worse with asymmetric tarps than with square/rectangular tarps.

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