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  1. #1
    Suede's Avatar
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    UQ protectors v sock v doors..

    Hi All. I know this is probably a common question as to what is the most effecient way to gain some wind protection and a few degrees extra warmth in the fringe seasons (not full-on winter camping but down to possibly upper/mid 20s). I am considering tarp doors, sock, and now considering an under quilt protector. My thinking is that the UQP will protect from wind and also trap a bit of heat. The sock will do the same but also trap heat on top, but possibly create some condensation issues and be a bit heavier/bulkier. I am leaning toward the UQP because it would come up the sides and pretty much keep most of the breeze off of me and be the lightest trade-off (other than built-in doors). In my thinking process, it seems like the closer the air trap, the more efficient it would be, ie UQP again. Having no experience with any of these options would love to get some opinions. Thanks.
    John aka Suede

  2. #2
    Cali's Avatar
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    I use an UQP when it is cool out, or raining, but a sock when it gets colder. I love my sock made by MacEntyre.
    Happy Hangin!!!


    AKA BajaHanger

    You cannot solve a problem with the same mind that created it. -Albert Einstein

  3. #3
    TZBrown's Avatar
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    Tarp with door might be the first thing to consider, stopping wind from ends seem to be a pretty big issue. Also it adds coverage for blowing wind, rain, and snow. If the tarp is pitched really low moisture will condense on the underside also. Shoulder seasons, and 20 deg you never know what might blow in, but in summer, doors are to much for me to want to carry.

    UQP adds a lot, but if it is coated, sometimes even un coated, will also condense under you and the quilts. Sometimes I just drape a piece of sil, or a poncho on the upwind side hung from the ridgeline and hammock suspension.

    A sock adds the most protection, but also has the most learning curve to use.
    But with a sock you can use a smaller tarp, leave the sock open on the entry side or even flip it all the way off the hammock and just have a windbreak on the upwind side.

    Every item has a place, and use, in different conditions. After a bit you might end up with one of each, and mix and match to the season and conditions.

    Practice with what you have, or can borrow, or make, and learn how to use each one to the best potential
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  4. #4
    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
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    My style is a tarp with doors in cold/cool conditions. A UQP will for sure help keep some heat in and keep the wind from knocking it out of your UQ.
    The thing I like about that style is that I can still see and be part of the woods. One of the reasons I got into hammock camping.
    Shug

    You can see Wanderin'Fool talk about his UQP on this video at 7:40

    Whoooo Buddy)))) I Love Onions, Grits, Greens, Livermush, NC Style BBQ, Potted Meat, Anchovies, 'Naner Puddin", Peanut Butter Pie, Red Velvet Cake and Cocoa and Straaaaaawwwwberrrry Milk and Coffee Crisps....
    I Hope Heaven has a Bakery!!!!



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  5. #5
    Suede's Avatar
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    Thanks TZ and Shug. I appreciate your feedback. Shug, learned a LOT from your videos.. I have been ramping up to go off-ground since late last summer and have been slowly putting together my hammock gear. TZ, what do you mean by learning curve for the sock?
    John aka Suede

  6. #6
    TZBrown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Space4DaPoppa View Post
    Thanks TZ and Shug. I appreciate your feedback. Shug, learned a LOT from your videos.. I have been ramping up to go off-ground since late last summer and have been slowly putting together my hammock gear. TZ, what do you mean by learning curve for the sock?
    Socks can be pretty temp finicky as far as condensation is concerned.

    Being aware of the temp and humidity outside, and how much you put out overnight can change the amount of venting necessary to keep things dry.
    Generally, over venting is the best practice.

    Natural materials tend to condense on the cold side, outside usually, nylons can't pass moisture fast enough and condense on the inside, if you are a heavy moisture generator as I am.
    Adjustable venting at the ends and possibly a breathing tube help to get the moisture away and out of the sock.
    In cold weather I always use a frost bib. It actually nearly covers the sock from side to side forcing the moisture to one end of the sock which you try to get rid of out a vent
    Life's A Journey
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    But rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting,
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  7. #7
    Senior Member peripatew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Space4DaPoppa View Post
    Hi All. I know this is probably a common question as to what is the most effecient way to gain some wind protection and a few degrees extra warmth in the fringe seasons (not full-on winter camping but down to possibly upper/mid 20s). I am considering tarp doors, sock, and now considering an under quilt protector. My thinking is that the UQP will protect from wind and also trap a bit of heat. The sock will do the same but also trap heat on top, but possibly create some condensation issues and be a bit heavier/bulkier. I am leaning toward the UQP because it would come up the sides and pretty much keep most of the breeze off of me and be the lightest trade-off (other than built-in doors). In my thinking process, it seems like the closer the air trap, the more efficient it would be, ie UQP again. Having no experience with any of these options would love to get some opinions. Thanks.
    Great post, was just thinking about this today over lunch. I'm waiting on my SuperFly to try out the difference that doors make. I've been in some places where the wind won't make up its mind on a direction throughout the night.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by peripatew View Post
    Great post, was just thinking about this today over lunch. I'm waiting on my SuperFly to try out the difference that doors make. I've been in some places where the wind won't make up its mind on a direction throughout the night.
    That is the very problem I have. The rain on the coast comes from every direction, except straight down. The wind I know how to deal with the rain, is a problem. I did find a very sheltered spot that is perfect, lots of protection offered from the trees that are very stable (they are always being blown by the wind.) Rain is the problem, it blows up under the tarp, come in the ends, sometimes it mists inside my hammock, too much moisture in the air or too close to the dew point or something. WET, Wet, wet. Ah, the Oregon Coast.

  9. #9
    +1 on Shug's response. I love my Superfly. I can lower it's height when its windy and pitch the doors. The wind really affects how much heat you can maintain. You can pitch the tarp into the wind on a hot day & it moves the air through the tarp to help cool. You can batten down the doors to prevent the wind from carrying away the heat.

    I just added a 2QZQ UQP and it's added another 5*-10*. When using my DreamHammock Dangerbird a few weeks ago, I had the tarp battened down, the UQP and the built in overcover (zipped up). It was 29* outside & 42* inside my hammock at the ridgeline.

  10. #10
    Suede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boomer View Post
    +1 on Shug's response. I love my Superfly. I can lower it's height when its windy and pitch the doors. The wind really affects how much heat you can maintain. You can pitch the tarp into the wind on a hot day & it moves the air through the tarp to help cool. You can batten down the doors to prevent the wind from carrying away the heat.

    I just added a 2QZQ UQP and it's added another 5*-10*. When using my DreamHammock Dangerbird a few weeks ago, I had the tarp battened down, the UQP and the built in overcover (zipped up). It was 29* outside & 42* inside my hammock at the ridgeline.
    I think this is the direction I am heading in minus the overcover. I ordered a 2QZQ UQP last week and I'm hoping to get doors by late winter. I think this might do the trick. Good to know about the UQP.
    John aka Suede

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