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  1. #1
    Monday's Avatar
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    Clothing to sleep in: is less more or is more more?

    I am totally new to winter hammocking and the forums. I just ordered my underquilt and top quilt from hammockgear and I am eagerly awaiting it's arrival

    I have read several people say that you don't want to overdress or you will lose warmth, but when watching videos from the Frozen Butt Hang it seemed like everyone was wearing everything they had! So does that rule have a temp limit?

    Here is my question: What are the best materials, layers and amounts of clothes to wear if you are not concerned with over heating, but only warmth and moisture management. Thanks!

    (I hope this is not a duplicate, but I didn't see anything after briefly searching.)

    Daniel

    P.S. I ordered a 0' Incubator and Burrow if that factors in to the question and I am not sure how cold I will go, but I frequent Colorado and the mountains so I want to be ready for 0'-ish.

  2. #2
    DuctTape's Avatar
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    More insulation is more insulation. However it must be done correctly.

    If one wears too much, you may sweat and get damp then you will get cold. The same is true with a VBL. Second, more clothing is sometimes restrictive to good blood flow, which may make you colder. Just like an extra pair of socks in your boots might not be an improvement.

  3. #3

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    There are a lot of variables and opinions. You want something breathable with moisture transport. I like mid to heavy weight long johns depending on the temp/trip. Some folks wear their outer layers to bed but I was always taught it was bringing dirt and moisture to bed with you. Strip off outer layer and stow just before getting into cozy nest. ;-)

    Now let's see what the others say... ;-)

  4. #4
    Senior Member blackd's Avatar
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    Personally i stick with a fresh pair of wool socks, and my long john shirt tucked into a baggy pair of jogging pants. Works like a charm for me.
    Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company.
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  5. #5
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    i spend normally about 25 nights a year hammocking in weather below 32degf .i have been at both frozen butt hangs.i used to strip down to my long undies before hitting the hammock.i started to notice that by the time i got redressed in the morning i would be half cold again.also getting up to visit a tree at night was downright uncomfortable in my long undies.now i stay mostly dressed.i prefer wool.usually i wear wool pants,and a wool sweater or two if its really cold.i normally start without socks and put them on if my feet get cold,unless its below about 10 then i start with the socks on.i wear a wool hat or hat and balaclava.
    diyin to hang

  6. #6
    Black Wolf's Avatar
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    It depends on temperature .. as well as how long you'll be repetitively using your gear .. and the ability to dry it out. This is why Vapor Barriers work so well, they keep moisture from penetrating into your down and freezing there.

    I'm gonna' technical on ya .. fabrics which are sealed are warmer because it prevents cold air blowing through to remove heat and it retains some humidity to reduce the evaporative chilling of your skin. Insensible sweat glands keep your skin moist for flexibility, even when cold. Highly porous clothes lose a lot of heat through convection and evaporation.

    When insensible sweating cannot keep up with the excessive drying your skin gets dry and chapped. Your body constantly produces, and loses heat. If heat loss matches production you stay comfortable ... clothed or unclothed, increase heat production, you will overheat. Your body responds by perspiring , to increase cooling by evaporation. ( Perspiration > Evaporation > Condensation )

    When the relative humidity in the air next to your skin is less than 100 percent moisture in your skin will continue to evaporate, cooling and drying your skin excessively. When humidity next to you skin reaches 100 percent evaporation stops, chilling stops, and insensible perspiration stops.

    The air will only "accept" so much water vapor. this is why it condenses in your outer layer.



    Staying warm in freezing to sub-zero temps is very technical .. long term even more so .. on average we lose 4 lbs of water a night .. 1/2 gallon.. that's a lot of moisture to manage even on an overnighter.

    Staying hydrated helps keep you warmer .. dehydration thickens the blood and thus slows circulation.
    "The wise man questions others wisdom because he questions his own, the foolish man because it is different from his own." Leo Stein

  7. #7
    Senior Member Mouseskowitz's Avatar
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    Can't say I really have this figured out. I sleep in my boxers and wool socks. Like lonetracker said, it's a little cool getting dressed in the morning and watering a tree. The one thing I've found is that if I have everything on to keep warm I get cold when I get out of my bag. The balance is probably somewhere in the middle but I haven't found it yet.

  8. #8
    DivaB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Wolf View Post
    It depends on temperature .. as well as how long you'll be repetitively using your gear .. and the ability to dry it out. This is why Vapor Barriers work so well, they keep moisture from penetrating into your down and freezing there.

    I'm gonna' technical on ya .. fabrics which are sealed are warmer because it prevents cold air blowing through to remove heat and it retains some humidity to reduce the evaporative chilling of your skin. Insensible sweat glands keep your skin moist for flexibility, even when cold. Highly porous clothes lose a lot of heat through convection and evaporation.

    When insensible sweating cannot keep up with the excessive drying your skin gets dry and chapped. Your body constantly produces, and loses heat. If heat loss matches production you stay comfortable ... clothed or unclothed, increase heat production, you will overheat. Your body responds by perspiring , to increase cooling by evaporation. ( Perspiration > Evaporation > Condensation )

    When the relative humidity in the air next to your skin is less than 100 percent moisture in your skin will continue to evaporate, cooling and drying your skin excessively. When humidity next to you skin reaches 100 percent evaporation stops, chilling stops, and insensible perspiration stops.

    The air will only "accept" so much water vapor. this is why it condenses in your outer layer.



    Staying warm in freezing to sub-zero temps is very technical .. long term even more so .. on average we lose 4 lbs of water a night .. 1/2 gallon.. that's a lot of moisture to manage even on an overnighter.

    Staying hydrated helps keep you warmer .. dehydration thickens the blood and thus slows circulation.
    Ok BlackWolf; to boil all of that down, can you just tell me at what temps it would be good to sleep in one of those sweaty suit things/or a trash bag with bread bags on my feet... and should I be naked to do it? If naked is better, then how does one handle mother natures calling at 4am? I can understand if in a sauna suit, but a trash bag would be tricky! These aren't me being funny type of questions....they're real

    Ohio just seems to have such borderline temps in the winter, with it really dropping super low late at night or early in the morning for just a small amount of time. It's that 35 to 20 area that frustrates me on what to really pack for, if you're only going to be in the 20s for a couple of hours.

    Play nice with me on the play ground. I'm good for the kickball and basketball team

  9. #9
    Whoooo Buddy)))) Shug's Avatar
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    I go to sleep in less and add as I get up in the night to pee or howl at the moon....
    By morning I am nearly all dressed up.
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    Whoooo Buddy)))) I Love Onions, Grits, Greens, Livermush, NC Style BBQ, Potted Meat, Anchovies, 'Naner Puddin", Peanut Butter Pie, Red Velvet Cake and Cocoa and Straaaaaawwwwberrrry Milk and Coffee Crisps....
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  10. #10
    Monday's Avatar
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    Thanks for the feedback. i am hearing a lot of long johns for base layers. Any recommendations on base layer materials? I'd heard cotton is bad because it soaks up moisture. Is something moisture wicking preferable or does that just push it into your down?

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