Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    NORTHWEST NORTH AMERICA
    Hammock
    DYI, ENO DB, HH
    Tarp
    Varies
    Insulation
    WOOL
    Suspension
    STOCK
    Posts
    487

    Think About Your Skill Level, Before Entering the Wilderness.

    I just received had an experience with a new member that is very interested in increasing his abilities for hanging in near artic conditions.

    I want to warn all members to gently increase their skill levels. Back yard Hanging works well, then maybe a State Camp Ground with your car nearby. Then a hike within easy reach of your vehicle. Gain knowledge first and besure you have the correct equipment and KNOWLEDGE.

    When you get in the WILDERNESS, YOU CAN DIE, IF IT IS COLD, OR YOU GET WET YOU CAN DIE VERY QUICKLY.

    Bears and Grizz are DANGEROUS, they are unperdictable. Moms kill things that get around their babies. Males kill during breeding season. Moose trample people as do Elk.

    Deep snow is like quicksand, you get stuck in it and can not walk.

    Whiteouts happen, sometimes very quickly. You can not see anything, you can freeze to death.

    These places are not for someone just learning.

    Ray Jardine and many other people have written books about wilderness camping. They warn of some of the dangers and how to avoid them. There are classes on Wilderness Survival. Guides and Old Timers will help new folks learn how to take care of their self. PLEASE TAKE THE TIME TO LEARN HOW TO BE SAFE.

    Just because tourist stop and feed the bears does not mean it is safe. Bears get cranky when the food runs out or is too slow coming.
    The bears that lose their fear of people are KILLED.

    Wild areas are not to be played with, you are risking your life. I have seen too many bad accidents and deaths for people going into areas that they are not prepared for.

  2. #2
    dragon360's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Toronto, ON
    Hammock
    WBBB/TR, DIY, HH, SB DL, GT UL
    Tarp
    ID/OES/WB/WL
    Insulation
    HG/WB/Go-Lite/WB
    Suspension
    Whoopie/Straps/DW
    Posts
    6,294
    Images
    1
    Very good advice for vets and beginners like.
    The key to immortality is first living a life worth remembering. - St. Augustine

    Some people feel the rain. Others just get wet.
    - Bob Marley

  3. #3
    Brute1100's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    South Texas
    Hammock
    WWM or tablecloth
    Tarp
    SuperFly
    Insulation
    shamu 40*
    Suspension
    UCR whoopie
    Posts
    2,508
    Images
    1
    Humbling and true for all things outdoor related...
    Live, Laugh, Love, if that doesn't work. Load, Aim and Fire, repeat as necessary...

    Buy, Try, Learn, Repeat

  4. #4
    WV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    southeast WV
    Hammock
    DIY
    Posts
    3,688
    Images
    204
    Agreed. (But don't you think you were a little tough on Grizz?)

  5. #5
    MAD777's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    South Florida
    Hammock
    DIY, WBBB & Switchback
    Tarp
    HG cuben,OES Spinn
    Insulation
    DIY down 3/4 UQ/TQ
    Suspension
    Dynaglide & Dutch
    Posts
    8,542
    Images
    39
    A healthy respect for the outdoors is to our benefit.
    This is true whether in the arctic or the ocean.
    I used to teach scuba diving and I raced sailing yachts across the ocean and the same good advice applies.
    Mike
    "Life is a Project!"

  6. #6
    Senior Member blaktee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Idaho Falls, ID
    Hammock
    DIY Gathered End
    Tarp
    HG Cuben Hex
    Insulation
    HG:Burrow/Incubato
    Suspension
    Whoopie Slings
    Posts
    484
    I say just go for it. What's the worst that could happen........

    ok, maybe this is good advice. but don't become a range rat. A range rat is a golfer that plays awesome golf on the range but sucks on the real course. sooner or later you got get out there and experience the back woods.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Davigilante's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Billings, MT
    Hammock
    Kammok Roo
    Suspension
    Python Straps
    Posts
    377
    I agree on the healthy respect thing. Respect Mother Nature - she's beautiful, but dangerous. Know the dangers, but don't obsess over them.

    Be smart. We got to the top of the food chain using our brains, not because we're bigger, stronger, faster or quicker than anything else. Use the tool between your ears - especially if things go wrong. Try not to panic, but rather think about the situation.

    Thinking and planning will keep you out of most trouble. And it'll help you out of most trouble too.
    ‟Im in love with Montana. For other states I have admiration, respect, recognition, even some affection. But with Montana it is love.″ John Steinbeck

  8. #8
    creativeKayt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Hammock
    Ask me tomorrow
    Tarp
    Old Blue
    Insulation
    DIY, HG Incubator
    Suspension
    Agnostic
    Posts
    1,106
    Images
    1
    Good reminders. I can't tell you how many people get in over their heads in the mountains where I grew up because they didn't respect their own limits or mother nature's ever-shifting mood swings. Things can go bad so fast -- without warning.

    Be safe, everybuggy!

  9. #9
    Senior Member zugcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Issaquah, WA
    Hammock
    WBBB DL1.0
    Tarp
    Superfly
    Insulation
    HG Phoenix 0*
    Suspension
    Web Straps
    Posts
    132
    HURTHEART has a very timely reminder. Winter camping has much less margin for error. Even a day hike can turn bad. How bad things can get seems to be directly related to how prepared one is. People talk about lions and tigers and bears. The real dangers are exposure and injury. Yes critters are a danger. But the larger danger is all the little stuff that preparation heads off. I am not afraid of the wilderness. But I have a VERY health respect for it. There may be people who can survive weeks alone in their underwear with only a knife. I am not one of them. Unless one has been to S.E.R.E school, I am betting most folks are not either. It seems like every year I hear about people found dead from exposure with enough weapons and ammunition to hold off a zombie horde. I take these as cautionary tales for what is important to remember in the great outdoors. These are the rules I try to live by when I venture out of civilization. These rules apply whether I'm in a state park or in the remote wilderness.

    Remember my skill level
    Don't let ambition kill me. I am older, slower, and much fatter than I used to be.

    Know my limits
    I am not trained in alpine mountaineering or desert solo survival. Don't do these things alone! I can't jello naked wrestle bears anymore I should avoid having to do so. (Summer job don't ask)

    Pack to survive the worst case
    Don't over pack. But plan gear for blizzards, broken legs, blistering sun, being stuck extra days, and etc, etc... Also, my idea of worst case is MUCH worst than most peoples. Planning for the worst case was my job for a very long time. EXAMPLE: http://xkcd.com/883/. Seriously don't plan for "Meh, what's the worst that could happen?" Plan for "Oh my God what if (x) happens?

    The more remote I am, the more redundancy I need for critical things
    I may need a back up shelter, extra fire starter, extra protective clothing for the environment, a secondary/tertiary way to get water. These are not comfort items. These are things you could die without if they fail.

    Always have a get home plan
    Be ready to revise it on the fly.

    Tell someone where you are and when to come looking for you
    Last edited by zugcat; 12-06-2012 at 03:26. Reason: I suck at typing

  10. #10
    Senior Member webhanger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Northern, Ut
    Hammock
    Handmade string & 1.1 dbl DIY
    Tarp
    Claytor diamond
    Insulation
    Wiggys FTRSS, pluq
    Suspension
    Webbing, whoopies
    Posts
    170
    Images
    12

    I've found two things to worry about killing you outdoors .

    1) Ignorance
    2) Arrogance (or overconfidence)

    Everything else seems to be a variation of either one or two.

    On the other hand ignorance is bliss (so I hear), and overconfidence frequently gives you a good adrenalin rush.

    I hope to live a long time blissfullyenjoying my adrenalinerushes.

    Plenty of good advice by those posting so far.
    Be wise and safe everyone.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •