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  1. #1
    Senior Member peripatew's Avatar
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    Question Pros and cons of Whoopies vs. Webbing? (Pacific Northwest)

    I've been digging through the forums (as this type of question has been asked a lot). But, I've got a few specific questions.

    I went from a HH Explorer -> WB Blackbird w/ the webbing suspension. Absolutely LOVE it. But really haven't had it out that much yet, but compared to the HH rope, it's amazing.

    But, I'm interested in trying out a whoopie sling setup. I've noticed a few mention they prefer this setup if they'll have to deal with sap much which seems true.

    But what about really wet weather? Seems like keeping the webbing away from my hammock would be idea for that?

    We also have some MASSIVE trees around here, and while I haven't had a problem yet, does a whoopie setup allow more freedom in setting things up? Mostly from the ability to have different strap sizes?

  2. #2
    New Member kayakbuilder's Avatar
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    I was initially going to go with webbing, but will probably do whoopies instead, for the reasons you mentioned, plus I am trying to lighten my pack, and the whoopies are pretty cool.

  3. #3
    SilvrSurfr's Avatar
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    I haven't dealt with webbing suspensions - I hit the ground running on whoopie slings. And I also haven't dealt with huge trees. Here in the Northeast, we pretty much clear cut everything so the trees aren't that big. Ninety-nine percent of the time, I go with 4 ft. tree huggers and 6 ft. whoopies. If I need extra length around the tree, I bring a few continuous loops and larkshead them onto the tree hugger.

    If I ever do go to a forest with huge trees, I'll probably bring 8 ft. tree straps. However, I can't ever see needing anything longer. I hear about the convenience of a strap suspension, but it seems so heavy, and I hate buckles.

    I'm sure if I ever get in a freezing rain and my whoopies lock up, I might think about straps, but I'm not sure they'd do any better in those conditions.

  4. #4
    hairbear's Avatar
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    i use the webbing ,but have never tried the woopies.i did try the strap and line suspension,my stiff fingers did not like that at all in the cold, with stiff old man fingers.

  5. #5
    MAD777's Avatar
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    6' Whoopies with 5' tree straps for me. Whoopies are so much easier to adjust and they are lighter and take up less volume.
    Mike
    "Life is a Project!"

  6. #6
    K0m4's Avatar
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    I just got whoopies recently after webbing it. I can't say I find that they make that much of a difference. You need some webbing to wrap around the tree, so there's bulk there. And weight-wise you'd really have to count your grams to be happy about it. They're easy to adjust, but so I find webbing with buckles. I have them now, so I'll use them - there's nothing bad about them.

    Then again, I've only used them once and that was for a trial for a couple of hours, maybe I'm in for a revelation.

  7. #7
    stevebo's Avatar
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    I've used both-------whoopies are really light, fun to build, and crazy easy to adjust---------on the down side, your suspension has lots of pieces and its easy to forget a strap or toggle at a campsite. Webbing is all one piece, easy to use, not quite as light or easy to adjust, but still a great system--------its a little bulkier too. It also might depend on what type of hammock you use, and Ive even heard of people putting whoopies on one end, and straps on the other!-----------------also in wet weather, whoopies work fine--water runs down the loose "tail end" of the whoopie as a drip loop. Whoopies also have to be a little bit longer than straps due to the bury.
    Last edited by stevebo; 12-11-2012 at 06:35.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member ibgary's Avatar
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    I used webbing and knots over the summer. On a MC space is at a premium, so now I'm using woopies or continuous loops, with small tree huggers, 4-5'.

  9. #9
    Señor Member wisenber's Avatar
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    One thing that you'll soon discover with whoopies versus straps is that allow for a shorter minimum distance between trees. Straps can go virtually to the end of the hammock, whereas whoopies require space for the line and then the webbing. Another benefit to straps is that if you find yourself in finger-numbing cold, straps are easier to manage and adjust than whoopies. As far as keeping the straps from getting the hammock wet, the buckles or rings act as a water break.

    I've found big trees to be an issue as well with whoopies. The tulip poplars in my backyard are over 8' in circumference as are many other in old growth forests around here. Having some 12-14' straps will manage that more easily than whoopies and 8' straps.

    I have both straps and whoopies, but I've been reverting back to mostly straps due to their adaptability and ease of deployment.

  10. #10
    Senior Member doc's Avatar
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    Best suspension IMHO (and I've tried Warbonnet straps) is 6ft whoopies with 5ft straps. I permanently attach the adjustable end of the whoopie to one end of the webbing loops. Then you just attach a soft shackle or biner to the other end of the strap. This way you will never lose a piece of your suspension and it is very lightweight. As previously mentioned you can keep a couple continuous loops for larger trees.

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