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Thread: Primaloft?

  1. #11
    WV's Avatar
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    I've used both Climashield Green and Primaloft for quilts, and both work. Personally, I prefer Primaloft, and haven't had any problems with bunching, but each material has its strengths, and many other people like Climashield.

  2. #12
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    I made an under quilt with primaloft sport 6 oz. one layer it is good down to 40 degrees for me.
    Thats in tee shirt and jeans.
    I picked up 5lbs. of loose primaloft I am going to work with next.
    I can levitate.......................................... .................................................. .................................................. .In my Hammock

  3. #13
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    Right guys. Thanks for your help. I'm still stuck. is there a difference in temperature rating between primaloft sport and one.
    Thanks
    Jacob

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    primaloft

    One of my quilts has a insulation comprised of insultex, thermoflect, and primaloft sport 6 oz. As you may know primaloft 6 oz. sport is about 1 1/4" thick, fully lofted out. The primaloft is not 'quilted' and, is only layed out in the quilt shell. It is not attached, and does not move around out of place.

    As far as a temperature rating, it is hard to say, sort of like a sleeping bag rating, it may be different for each person. With the insultex, and thermoflect, my quilt with the primaloft is good to the low thirties at least, I have not gone colder yet, but, suspect it would be lower. The quilt weighs 2.4 lb. and compresses down acceptably for my needs, about the same compressed size as down.
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ibgary View Post
    What is " clo " ?
    From Wikipedia article on Clothing Insulation:

    1 clo = 0.155 Km/W

    This is the amount of insulation that allows a person at rest to maintain thermal equilibrium in an environment at 21C (70F) in a normally ventilated room (0.1 m/s air movement). Above this temperature the person so dressed will sweat, whereas below this temperature the person will feel cold.
    Knotty
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  6. #16
    Senior Member ibgary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountain_man_mike View Post
    I came into a stock of Climashield that I have been very happy with and it's similar (not indentical, but similar) to Primaloft.

    The Climashield Apex comes in 2.5 oz. per yard and 5.0 oz. per yard with a clo factor of 2.1 for the 2.5 oz. and 4.1 for the 5.0 oz. respectively. ..
    Perhaps I need more coffee.
    If a clo factor of 1 equals thermal equilibrium at 70 deg. (see post by knotty) Then 2.1 would be higher & 4.1 >. So the higher the clo the warmer the insulation. Ok. Coffe is kicking in.

    So, a change from a clo rating of 1 is worth about 18 deg. A clo of 4.1 would/should be comfy to about 15 deg.
    Thanks.
    Last edited by ibgary; 12-15-2012 at 08:42.

  7. #17
    New Member Bas2ct's Avatar
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    Some math

    Quote Originally Posted by outdoordude View Post
    So im going to order some primaloft.
    Im a bit confused about the weights. This one is 6oz per sq meter. http://www.extremtextil.de/catalog/P...200g::715.html
    Would i need to have two layers to get down to 20F.
    Need your opinion on this as im ordering soon and dont want to order too much.,

    Also is it neccessary to quilt primaloft?
    If so what is quilting and how is it done as i just dont get it?

    Thanks
    Jacob

    Hey Jacob,

    This is cool stuff. I am new here, although not new to hammocks. I was looking to make myself a UQ, and thus having the same questions.

    The website states that for primaloft one, quilting should be done for every 15 cm (6 inches). For Primaloft sport every 60 cm (24 inches). This is in all directions! (6 oz thickness)

    I am a bit of a number cruncher, so i started looking for some specific information on the subject of clo. I am used to metric units, so i had to do some conversions. Actually, the clo is an easy number to use. The ANSI/ASHRAE 55-2010 standard (an American standard that has to do with thermal environmental conditions for human occupancy (not my words.. :S)) gives a lot of information. Links to the .pdf's i used for info:

    http://www.ashrae.org/File%20Library.../55_2010_a.pdf
    http://www.ashrae.org/File%20Library..._8-28-2012.pdf

    (
    Quote Originally Posted by ibgary View Post
    Perhaps I need more coffee.
    If a clo factor of 1 equals thermal equilibrium at 70 deg. (see post by knotty) Then 2.1 would be higher & 4.1 >. So the higher the clo the warmer the insulation. Ok. Coffe is kicking in.

    So, a change from a clo rating of 1 is worth about 18 deg. A clo of 4.1 would/should be comfy to about 15 deg.
    Thanks.
    The equation according to ANSI/ASHRAE (or at least the one used for the standard): "...An increase of 0.1 clo or
    0.1 met corresponds to 0.8C (1.4F) or 0.5C (0.9F) operative
    temperature reduction; a decrease of 0.1 clo or 0.1 met
    corresponds to 0.8C (1.4F) or 0.5C (0.9F) operative
    temperature increase...."

    So, using Primaloft Sport 200 (200 gram per square meter): clo=0.023 per gram per square meter, so definite clo is (200*0.023=)4,6

    1 clo equals 21.1C, so the temperature should / could be:
    (21.1-(((4.6-1)/0.1)*0.8)=) -7.7C

    Or for Fahrenheit: (70-(((4.6-1)/0.1)*1.4)=) 19.6F

    This model does not account for thermal loss due to wind or humidity.

    You where very close, ibgary! The coffee worked. Every clo represents 14F in optimum conditions. The manufacturers use the equations in these ANSI/AHSRAE standards to calculate the comfort and extreme ratings they give their gear. I can imagine their calculations to be somewhat more elaborate (taking wind, humidity, material compression etc in the equation)..?

    One layer of Primaloft Sport 200 should suffice, Jacob!
    Also, look at this: http://www.extremtextil.de/catalog/H...-qm::1801.html
    If you incorporate this in your design in a way that it can reflect your heat, but does not resist breathability of your quilt, it could potentially inhance the comfortzone of your quilt by 10C (18F)! I am planning something like that myself.


    This is what i could find out so far, hope it helps!
    Last edited by Bas2ct; 12-15-2012 at 21:48. Reason: Noticed some irregularities in text, additional comment

  8. #18
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    Bas2ct - Welcome to the forum. That's one heavy weight first post! Always good to have people who know how to compute around here. Looking forward to your contributions to this community.
    Knotty
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  9. #19
    Senior Member Lupus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bas2ct View Post
    Hey Jacob,

    This is cool stuff. I am new here, although not new to hammocks. I was looking to make myself a UQ, and thus having the same questions.

    The website states that for primaloft one, quilting should be done for every 15 cm (6 inches). For Primaloft sport every 60 cm (24 inches). This is in all directions! (6 oz thickness)

    I am a bit of a number cruncher, so i started looking for some specific information on the subject of clo. I am used to metric units, so i had to do some conversions. Actually, the clo is an easy number to use. The ANSI/ASHRAE 55-2010 standard (an American standard that has to do with thermal environmental conditions for human occupancy (not my words.. :S)) gives a lot of information. Links to the .pdf's i used for info:

    http://www.ashrae.org/File%20Library.../55_2010_a.pdf
    http://www.ashrae.org/File%20Library..._8-28-2012.pdf

    (

    The equation according to ANSI/ASHRAE (or at least the one used for the standard): "...An increase of 0.1 clo or
    0.1 met corresponds to 0.8C (1.4F) or 0.5C (0.9F) operative
    temperature reduction; a decrease of 0.1 clo or 0.1 met
    corresponds to 0.8C (1.4F) or 0.5C (0.9F) operative
    temperature increase...."

    So, using Primaloft Sport 200 (200 gram per square meter): clo=0.023 per gram per square meter, so definite clo is (200*0.023=)4,6

    1 clo equals 21.1C, so the temperature should / could be:
    (21.1-(((4.6-1)/0.1)*0.8)=) -7.7C

    Or for Fahrenheit: (70-(((4.6-1)/0.1)*1.4)=) 19.6F

    This model does not account for thermal loss due to wind or humidity.

    You where very close, ibgary! The coffee worked. Every clo represents 14F in optimum conditions. The manufacturers use the equations in these ANSI/AHSRAE standards to calculate the comfort and extreme ratings they give their gear. I can imagine their calculations to be somewhat more elaborate (taking wind, humidity, material compression etc in the equation)..?

    One layer of Primaloft Sport 200 should suffice, Jacob!
    Also, look at this: http://www.extremtextil.de/catalog/H...-qm::1801.html
    If you incorporate this in your design in a way that it can reflect your heat, but does not resist breathability of your quilt, it could potentially inhance the comfortzone of your quilt by 10C (18F)! I am planning something like that myself.


    This is what i could find out so far, hope it helps!
    Thanks a ton, this helps me a lot. In fact, it makes the whole CLO thing make sense to the point that I can now reliably (I think) calculate comfort levels for synthetic insulation. Thank you.
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  10. #20
    New Member JC77's Avatar
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    Okay, my mind is BLOWN! Can I get a condensed version in english? I'd like to make a "pod" for my hammock. My desired temp rating is about 15 degrees. Based on the potential vapor barier properties of Insultex it was recommended I use Primaloft of Climashield. Can someone provide support for this guy? Thank you.
    "Hanging is soul therapy" -Jeff

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